Announcing: Kat Meads

Kat Meads headshot_300+In 2008, in Issue 2, Superstition Review published Kat Meads’ essay Relativism: The Size of the Tsar in Vegas.We were honored for her contribution, and we are now very happy to share the news of her recently released novel.

Announcing:

when the dust finally settles
by Kat Meads
A novel about land, loyalty and racial politics in the 1968 South
Ravenna Press, September 2011
http://www.katmeads.com

Advance Praise for when the dust finally settles:

When anyone asks if Southern Literature has a future in our internet, iPhone, jet-lagged, speed-of-light world, I point them to Kat Meads. Her fiction is Southern through and through even as it embraces the dilemmas and contradictions of 21st century life. Simply put, you must read Kat Meads.
—Jason Sanford, Founding Editor, storySouth

Kat Meads’ writing is keen and precise; her stories, populous and lively. In when the dust finally settles, she employs a staccato, rhythmic prose in the service of a narrative both beautifully imagined and wildly exotic. when the dust finally settles will keep you up nights reading its propulsive story, but will also reward the reader who loves finely crafted sentences and pitch-perfect dialogue.
—Corey Mesler, author of Following Richard Brautigan

In The Invented Life of Kitty Duncan, Kat Meads created a 1950’s-era Scarlett O’Hara in eastern North Carolina. Now, in when the dust finally settles, she speaks through Faulknerian voices as white and black members of her small eastern North Carolina community desegregate the schools in the 1960’s. Meads’ Clarence Carter, speaking from the dead, provides a surprisingly upbeat (and humorous) perspective on the events unfolding in the community he has not yet quite left. The other voices, young and old, share Clarence’s openness to change—a refreshingly different Southern story.
—Dr. Margaret D. Bauer, Rives Chair of Southern Literature, East Carolina University;
Editor, North Carolina Literary Review

_______________________

The Reading Period at Superstition Review has opened. Please send us your submissions of art, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction  between now and October 31st.

Follow Me

Superstition Review

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. The mission of our journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry.
Follow Me

8 thoughts on “Announcing: Kat Meads

  • September 8, 2011 at 2:21 am
    Permalink

    Wonderful, congratulations to Kat Meads, I enjoyed reading through Relativism: The Size of the Tsar in Vegas, featured in issue 2. She is a wonderful writer.

    Reply
  • September 8, 2011 at 9:56 pm
    Permalink

    Congratulations to Kat Meads! I think there is definitely an interest in Southern literature, based on the popularity of “The Help” book and movie.

    Reply
  • September 9, 2011 at 1:24 am
    Permalink

    So great to see that Superstition Review worked as a wonderful stepping stone for Meads! Hats off to her!

    Reply
  • September 9, 2011 at 2:16 am
    Permalink

    When the Dust Finally Settles sounds incredible. I’ll keep an eye out for it at the bookstore I work at!

    Reply
  • September 9, 2011 at 8:40 am
    Permalink

    It’s good to see the achievements of authors who have been published by Superstition Review. I think Kat Meads’ novel is very timely, given the popularity of The Help in theatres this summer.

    Reply
  • September 9, 2011 at 2:18 pm
    Permalink

    Congrats to Kat Meads! I can’t wait to read the new novel.

    Reply
  • September 14, 2011 at 8:18 pm
    Permalink

    I look forward to picking up this novel. The South in that time period is so fascinating, especially with all of the social, political, and cultural changes taking place. Should be a great read.

    Reply
  • September 16, 2011 at 8:38 am
    Permalink

    I haven’t read any of her work but I will have to check it out!

    Reply

Leave a Reply