Prison English Conference at ASU Feb 3

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Superstition Review

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. The mission of our journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry.
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6 thoughts on “Prison English Conference at ASU Feb 3

  • February 1, 2012 at 5:29 am
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    This is a creative way of thinking about how the arts, specifically literature, can be used to address a major social challenge. While, these inmates may have lost some of their civil rights, by providing them with the opportunity to engage in something that is truly human, language, it acknowledges that inmates deserve respect as human beings and should be valued as such. Furthermore, allowing inmates to engage with society through literature seems like a potential precursor for the building of a strong foundation from which they can be reintegrated into society.

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    • February 2, 2012 at 4:02 am
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      We have to remember that inmates are individuals too, who, like you said, deserve respect. Literature is a great way of engaging them in theological and ideological conversations, and furthermore, reflect on themselves. It will be interesting to see the impact these types of programs have.

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  • February 2, 2012 at 10:27 pm
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    I think this is a great idea. Personal family experience tells me that prisons — although understandably very difficult places to exist in and endure — nonetheless can allow for great rehabilitation and re-education. My brother made mistakes in his life, and spent several years at a state prison in Arizona, but worked to educate himself while he was incarcerated. He also utilized his work experience there to become certified as an automotive technician, a field he now works in as a fully rehabilitated and accomplished individual. I am incredibly proud of him, and think more opportunities like this to aid prisoners in reform and education are fantastic ideas, and need to be explored.

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    • February 3, 2012 at 4:28 pm
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      Thank you for sharing that story about your brother, he sounds like a really inspiring person. Rehabilitation — not punishment — should always be the goal of incarceration, because helping people who have made mistakes in their lives helps everyone.

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  • February 3, 2012 at 11:04 am
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    This is so exciting. I have met Michelle before, through my internship with the PEN Project, and I love to see efforts like this gaining momentum.

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  • February 6, 2012 at 10:04 am
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    What a wonderful conference!–thanks to all who helped pull this off. I just want to say, as a person who been on inside looking out, it was people like you all, reaching out to me in a very dark place, that gave me the grace to go on, to focus not on the long years ahead of me, but on what I could make of myself during those long years.

    You’re all amazing!

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