Andy Warhol Exhibit at ASU Art Museum

Art MuseumASU Art Museum recipient of works by Andy Warhol, to be on display Summer 2014

Tempe, Ariz. – The Arizona State University Art Museum is pleased to announce that it is the recipient of six new works by artist Andy Warhol, a gift from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. These original Warhol screenprints will be on view in the lobby of the ASU Art Museum at Mill Avenue and 10th Street in Tempe this summer, beginning May 27, 2014.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts was established after Warhol’s death, in 1987, and in accordance with Warhol’s will, it has given prints to many institutions across the country to ensure “that the many facets of Warhol’s complex oeuvre are both widely accessible and properly cared for.” In 2008, the ASU Art Museum received 155 photographs by Andy Warhol from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, part of the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, which donated over 28,500 photographs to educational institutions across the United States.

“That the Warhol Foundation recognizes the value of university and college art museums like ours is both a tremendous honor and a reflection on the Foundation’s thoughtful work,” says ASU Art Museum Director Gordon Knox. “We are overjoyed to be the recipient of these prints and to share and explore Warhol’s work with our university audience and the Phoenix community.”

The gifted prints themselves are rare examples of works that Warhol did not necessarily intend to share with the public. “In the development of an image toward printing a uniform edition, Warhol would experiment with both color and compositional elements, creating many variations of prints outside the final, editioned image,” says Jean Makin, ASU Art Museum print collection manager and curator. “These ‘outside edition’ prints were often not signed. Warhol gave some away to friends or clients, but he kept most of them.”

“This addition to the ASU Art Museum’s print holdings only further strengthens the museum’s ability to be a valuable resource to students, professors and scholars,” Makin continues. “Viewing unique works like these screenprints is an educational experience that brings a physical reality to study and research.”

The Warhol prints join the ASU Art Museum’s collection of more than 5,000 prints. The collection is held in the museum’s Jules Heller Print Study Room, which provides a secure environment for care and storage while also being an accessible resource for research and viewing by students, scholars and general visitors. More than 600 students visit the Jules Heller Print Study Room each year to closely examine and study selections from the collection.

ABOUT THE ASU ART MUSEUM

The ASU Art Museum, named “the single most impressive venue for contemporary art in Arizona” by Art in America magazine, is part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. The museum serves a vast cross-section of the Phoenix-metro area through three locations: the ASU Art Museum and ASU Art Museum Brickyard in Tempe, and the ASU Art Museum International Artist Residency Program in downtown Phoenix.

Museum admission at any location is always free.

Summer Hours: The ASU Art Museum and ASU Art Museum Brickyard are open 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The museum is closed on Sundays, Mondays and holidays.

To learn more about the museum, call 480.965.2787 or visit asuartmuseum.asu.edu.

JEANNE (JUNO) SCHASER

Public Relations and Marketing Specialist

Follow Me

Superstition Review

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. The mission of our journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry.
Follow Me

Latest posts by Superstition Review (see all)

Leave a Reply