SR Pod/Vod Series: Writer Michelle Brafman

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Michelle Brafman.

Kittner_20140916_4158Michelle Brafman is the author of We Named Them All: Stories, and her debut novel Washing the Dead will be published by Prospect Park Books in April of 2015. She has received numerous awards for her fiction, including a Special Mention in the 2010 Pushcart Prize Anthology, the F. Scott Fitzgerald Short Story prize, and first place in the Lilith Magazine Fiction contest. Her stories have appeared in The Minnesota Review, Blackbird, and Fifth Wednesday Journal, among other places. She teaches fiction writing at George Washington University and the Johns Hopkins University MA in Writing Program. Michelle is also an award-winning filmmaker and lives in Glen Echo, Maryland with her husband and two children. For more information: www.michellebrafman.com

You can listen to the podcast on our iTunes Channel.

You can read along with the work in Superstition Review.

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Superstition Review

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. The mission of our journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry.
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4 thoughts on “SR Pod/Vod Series: Writer Michelle Brafman

  • December 6, 2014 at 9:28 am
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    “… teaches fiction writing …” I always am astonished how US Americans end up making everything “teachable”, even “creativity” in a sense. I believe it was Asimov who said “any technology advanced enough is indistinguishable from magic”. Somehow when I first heard of creative writing being taught I thought “there goes the magic” but so far it has only increased the (quality of) output without taking away from the appeal of the “classics”.

    Reply
    • February 10, 2015 at 2:18 pm
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      Thanks for your comment Maureen. We have followed the debate about the teachability of creativity as well. ultimately, it seems like practice is most important with any skill, including writing.

      Reply
    • February 17, 2015 at 10:02 pm
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      We love that some students end up finding their passion for writing while taking classes on creative writing. We agree, the quality of creative writing has certainly increased, and we hope to continue to see more!

      Reply

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