Guest Post, Bill Gaythwaite: Any Particular Day

swimmerIt occurred to me recently, not for the first time, that my swimming reminds me of my writing process. I’m a lap swimmer in a community pool.  I swim very long distances. My pool is not part of a fancy gym. The locker room is way too small. Sometimes it’s as crowded in there as a subway at rush hour.  There’s a grungy gang shower too, with cracks in the tile and some broken fixtures.  Hot water is more a hope than a reality.  You have to bring your own towel to this place and last week someone pried open my combination lock and stole the money from my wallet while I was doing my laps. I was grateful they left the wallet though, and figured maybe they needed the $22 more than I did. Actually, I love this gym and I love the pool, which, unlike the locker room, is clean and well-maintained. The lifeguards are friendly. Now, writing has its challenges too.  Sometimes the water isn’t hot and the fixtures are broken. And the most obvious comparison between the two is that lap swimming is this solitary effort, where you literally throw yourself into the deep end and just take off. Most writers understand that part. Personally, I’m not the flashiest swimmer or the fastest. My technique isn’t the prettiest either, but I do keep at it. That’s like my writing. And like writing, the benefits of swimming work best when you stick to a regular schedule or routine. You increase your stamina over time. Writing a short story is like a long swim for me. It’s tough to get started sometimes. You can struggle at first. You flail away. And then you eventually find a rhythm and you pace yourself. You don’t stop. You try not to lose steam before the finish. (If writing a short story is like a long swim for me, then working on my unpublished novel was more like running a marathon at a high altitude – but that’s another topic entirely.) I don’t think of lap swimming as only a metaphor. It has become part of my writing process too. Sometimes a swim will clear my head and get me back into a space where I can work. But I’ve also tackled plot problems, created back stories for characters and tried out dialogue as I thrash around in the pool, sometimes losing count of my laps as a result. I’m grateful for my time in the water and for my time at the computer too, when things come together and I have enough momentum to carry me through. I think my writing and lap swimming have become somewhat linked in my mind, the endurance part anyway, the personal challenge, the dogged persistence. As with anything, it comes down to commitment — that happy dedication to something that will eventually become part of who you really are, at any moment, on any particular day.

Bill Gaythwaite

Bill Gaythwaite is on the staff of the Committee on Asia and the Middle East at Columbia University. His short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Grist, Alligator Juniper, The Summerset Review, Streetlight, Word Riot, and elsewhere. Bill’s story, Dear Coach Carl, can be found in Issue 14 of Superstition Review. His short play, Assistance, was performed at Circle Rep in New York City and he has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Bill's work can also be found in the anthologies Mudville Diaries and Hashtag: Queer.

2 thoughts on “Guest Post, Bill Gaythwaite: Any Particular Day

  • May 30, 2016 at 7:06 am
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    I, too, solve plot/dialogue problems while swimming laps. For me, it’s a necessary part of my writing. A long walk should work, too, but somehow it just doesn’t.

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  • May 30, 2016 at 3:19 pm
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    Swimming laps is like meditation in that you are completely concentrated on your breathing — there is the white noise of your own breath behind everything. Especially when I used to swim 40 laps a day I got a lot of important thinking done, important calming down. Now that I have hurt my shoulder, I turn to walking, which is only a poor substitute both physically and otherwise for swimming. Maybe I’ll get back to it again. In the meantime, yoga, walking, and tennis will have to do.

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