#ArtLitPhx: Poetry Reading: Carl Phillips

#artlitphxDate: October 25, 2018

Time: 7:00pm

Location: University of Arizona Poetry Center, 1508 E Helen St, Tucson, AZ 85719

Event Description:

We are proud to present Carl Phillips, who will read from his work. After the reading, there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Carl Phillips is the author of fourteen books of poetry, most recently Wild Is the Wind (FSG, 2018), and Reconnaissance (FSG, 2015), winner of the PEN USA Award and the Lambda Literary Award.  He is also the author of two books of prose: The Art of Daring: Risk, Restlessness, Imagination (Graywolf, 2014) and Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Life and Art of Poetry (Graywolf, 2004), and he is the translator of Sophocles’ Philoctetes (Oxford, 2004).  A four-time finalist for the National Book Award, his honors include the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Poetry, the Kingsley Tufts Award, the Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Library of Congress, and the Academy of American Poets. He teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.

Authors Talk: Bryn Gribben

Today we are pleased to feature author Bryn Gribben as our Authors Talk series contributor. The topic of Bryn’s podcast is “finding your voice.” She begins by saying that “Everything you do before you find your voice matters,” and, to demonstrate this truth, describes her own journey of discovery as a creative writer and poet.

In the beginning of her college experience, Bryn states that she “was more interested in learning than in creating.” However, after discovering that she “just wasn’t having enough fun,” she began to pursue the creation of poetry. She says that “the feedback I was getting at the time made it seem like I had to choose between two paths: the academic and the creative,” but as she continued to find her literary voice, she realized that she didn’t have to make a choice. She just, as she says, “had to find a different audience.” She emphasizes that nowadays, she is still “pulled constantly between those two modes of being,” the analytical and the creative; for, as she says, “both modes of being engage my best self.”

You can read Bryn’s essay, “Divorce Closet,” in Issue 21 of Superstition Review.

#ArtLitPhx: Performance Narrative: Walonda Williams

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Event Description:

Performance Narrative: Literary Wordplay Breaks into Stageplay with Walonda Williams

Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Location: Piper Writers House, 450 E Tyler Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281
Cost: $99 Regular, $90 ASU, $80 Student

To learn more and register, visit https://piper.asu.edu/classes/walonda-williams/performance-narrative

About the Class
Performance narrative is for every writer—those who may want to add new elements to one’s current writing style or those who are interested in writing performance pieces. Together, let us explore contemporary writers (Carla Harryman, Ron Allen, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy and Nova Baize) who have moved descriptive narrative into experimental performance. As a class, we will consider a social problem, and then in groups create a narrative work and add performance elements. In brief and playful revisions, text arrangement will indicate sound and pace dynamics. Two to three members of each group will perform the pieces. We will conclude with a group discussion to share how performance narrative can enhance one’s style of writing or be used to inspire a new work. Please, feel free to bring your laptop or tablet to make fast revisions, and if you feel more comfortable writing by hand, notebooks and pens are also welcome.

About the Instructor
Proud to be a Phoenix resident for four years, Walonda Williams hails from Detroit, Michigan, where she graduated with a BFA in Theater from Wayne State University. Williams recently completed her MBA, specializing in project management, from Strayer University. By writing poetry, short stories and staged-plays, Williams aims to provide an otherworldly perspective and employ organic process to unleash the marginalized voice. She trusts that the written word can shift painful pasts into dynamic action.

#ArtLitPhx: Letters to the Future: Celebration & Launch

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Event Description:

Join Kore Press & Tucson Museum of Art on the evening of Thursday, October 11, 2018 for a free community celebration of the groundbreaking *Letters to the Future* anthology and exhibition. The museum and community gallery will be open to the public from 6:00 – 8:00 PM.

The Tucson launch party features readings by visiting artists Dawn Lundy Martin, Erica Hunt, Ruth Ellen Kocher, and giovanni singleton, book signing, and gallery viewing. 30 Americans and the Letters to the Future exhibitions will be accessible.

The micro exhibition of audio, visual, and textual works from the book is in the museum’s community gallery, and is in dialog with the featured exhibition, “30 Americans,” on view in the main galleries. The launch event is a feature of the UA Humanities Festival that runs the month of October.

Admission to this event is free.

This event is in partnership with Tucson Museum Of Art, The Dunbar Pavilion, Tucson Humanities Festival, Africana Studies, Institute for LGBT Studies, and Social and Behavioral Sciences.


*Letters to the Future: Black Women / Radical Writing*, collects temporal, spatial, formal, and linguistically innovative literature from Black women from the United States, England, Canada, and the Caribbean, celebrating work that challenges readers to participate in meaning-making.


About the speakers:
Dawn Lundy Martin is a poet, essayist, and conceptual video artist. She is the author of four books of poems and three chapbooks, including most recently, Life in a Box is a Pretty Life (Nightboat Books, 2015) and Good Stock Strange Blood (Coffee House Press, 2017). She is currently at work on a memoir. Her nonfiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, and other magazines. Martin is also a co-founder of the Black Took Collective, an experimental performance art/poetry group of three, and a member of HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?,a global arts collective. She has been awarded the 2015 Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Poetry and a 2016 Investing in Professional Artists Grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Heinz Endowments. Martin is Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh and Co-director of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics.

Erica Hunt is a poet, essayist, and author of Local History (Roof Books, 1993) and Arcade (Kelsey St. Press, 1996), Piece Logic (Carolina Wren Press, 2002), Time Slips Right Before Your Eyes (Belladonna*, 2015), & A Day and Its Approximates (Chax Press, 2013). Her poems and non-fiction have appeared in BOMB, Boundary 2, Brooklyn Rail, Conjunctions, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Poetics Journal, Tripwire, Recluse, In the American Tree and Conjunctions. Essays on poetics, feminism, and politics have been collected in Moving Borders: Three Decades of Innovative Writing by Women and The Politics of Poetic Form, The World, and other anthologies. Hunt has received awards from the Foundation for Contemporary Art, the Fund for Poetry, and the Djerassi Foundation and is a past fellow of Duke University/University of Capetown Program in Public Policy. Past writer in residence in the Contemporary Poetics/Creative Writing program at the University of Pennsylvania, and at Bard College’s MFA program, Hunt has taught at Wesleyan University and was a repeat faculty member at Cave Canem Retreat, a workshop for Black writers from 2004 to 2015.

Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of Third Voice (Tupelo Press, 2016),Ending in Planes (Noemi Press, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo Press, 2013), Dorset Prize winner and the 2014 PEN/Open Book Award, One Girl Babylon (New Issues Press, 2003) Green Rose Prize winner, When the Moon Knows You’re Wandering (New Issues Press, 2002), andDesdemona’s Fire (Lotus Press 1999) Naomi Long Madgett Prize winner. Her poems appear in Angles of Ascent: A Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poets, Black Nature, From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great, An Anthology for Creative Writers: The Garden of Forking Paths, IOU: New Writing On Money, New Bones: Contemporary Black Writing in America. She has been awarded fellowships from the Cave Canem Foundation and Yaddo. She is a Contributing Editor at Poets & Writers Magazine and and Professor of English at the University of Colorado where she teaches Poetry, Poetics, and Literature.

giovanni singleton is a native of Richmond, Virginia, a former debutant, and founding editor of nocturnes (re)view of the literary arts, a journal dedicated to experimental work of the African Diaspora and other contested spaces. Her debut poetry collection, Ascension(Counterpath Press), informed by the music and life of Alice Coltrane, received the 81st California Book Award Gold Medal. She has received fellowships from the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Workshop, Napa Valley Writers Conference, and Cave Canem. singleton regularly consults and gives presentations on writing, editing, graphic design, and publishing at high schools, colleges, and conferences. Her work has appeared in What I Say: Innovative Poetry by Black Writers in America, Best American Experimental Writing, Inquiring Mind, Angles of Ascent: A Norton Anthology, and elsewhere, and has also been exhibited in the Smithsonian Institute’s American Jazz Museum, San Francisco’s first Visual Poetry and Performance Festival, and on the building of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. She has taught poetry at the de Young Museum, CalArts, Naropa University, and Sonoma State University. She was the 2015-16 Visiting Assistant Professor in the creative writing programs at New Mexico State University and currently coordinates the Lunch Poems reading series at UC Berkeley.

KorePress.org

Contributor Update, Sharanya Manivannan: The Queen of Jasmine Country

The Queen of Jasmine Country CoverToday we are glad to announce that Sharanya Manivannan’s first novel, The Queen of Jasmine Country, is available for pre-order on Amazon India. According to the book’s synopsis, myths, dreams, desires, the timeless reality of the body and soul – in the midst of nature’s bounty – is at the essence of The Queen of Jasmine Country. This is the first novel in English about the celebrated 9th century Tamil poet Andal, who was known for her erotic devotional verses.

Four poems by Sharanya can be read in Issue 6 of Superstition Review here.

Congratulations, Sharanya!

#ArtLitPhx: The Storyline SLAM: Haunted

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Date: October 12th

Time: 7pm-9pm

Location: The Newton, 300 W Camelback Rd, Phoenix, Arizona 85013

Event Description:

We’re all of us haunted and haunting. ― Chuck Palahniuk, Lullaby

10 STORYTELLERS. 6 MINUTES. 1 WINNER

Ten tellers will have 6 minutes each to share a story based on the theme Haunted.

Sign up on TheStoryline.org September 15th through October 6th to tell a story. Eight names will be drawn October 7th and posted on the TheStoryline.org. At least two more names will be drawn at the beginning of the show.

Five members of the audience will be the judges. The storyteller with the most points at the end of the show receives a $30 cash prize.

Contributor Update, James M. Chesbro: A Lion in the Snow

A Lion in the Snow CoverToday we are proud to announce news about past contributor James M. Chesbro. James’ collection of essays titled A Lion in the Snow has been released and is available for purchase through Amazon here. The synopsis reads as follows: When his wife was pregnant, James M. Chesbro started having daydreams of seeing a lion in his street, padding toward his house through the snowflakes of a New England storm. He felt more like a son, still grieving over the early loss of his own father, rather than a prepared expectant-dad. In these essays, Chesbro finds himself disoriented and bewildered by fatherhood again and again as he explores the maddening moments that provide occasions for new understandings about our children and us.

James’ essay, “From the Rust and Sawdust,” which first appeared in Issue 12 of Superstition Review, is included in the collection.

Congratulations, James!