#ArtLitPhx: Superstition Review Issue 20 Launch Party

Issue 20 Launch Party

If you’re in the Phoenix area, we hope you will join us for our Tenth Anniversary Celebration on Thursday, December 7! The party will take place from 6pm to 8pm at the Contemporary Arts Museum at the Mesa Arts Center. We are so thrilled to celebrate our tenth year and our twentieth issue.

Since the magazine’s founding in 2008 by Patricia Murphy, Superstition Review has published engaging and innovative works of fiction, nonfiction, interviews, poetry, and art. We have featured over 750 established and emerging authors from all over the world and are excited to announce the expansion of our family of contributors with our upcoming issue.

All staff members, contributors, members of the literary community, and friends and family are welcome to join Superstition Review in the celebration of ten years and twenty issues at the Mesa Arts Center.

The event is free and open to the public.

We will be serving cake and exploring the exhibits at the Contemporary Arts Museum, including “Slang Aesthetics!” by Robert Williams in the Dobson Main Gallery, “After Party” by Julie Heffernan in the SRP Gallery, and “The Dusk Parade” by Joe Sorren in the North Gallery.

The agenda will also include a brief talk from the issue’s editors.

Please check out the Facebook event page for updates. We hope to see you there!

#ArtLitPhx: “Expression & Dialogue” Exhibition at Royse Contemporary

Royse Expression and DialogueRoyse Contemporary is so excited to present “Expression & Dialogue,” the joint exhibition of Dan Pederson and Thuong Nguyen, opening on Thursday, November 9. The exhibit will showcase Pederson’s mixed media assemblages and Nguyen’s abstract paintings.

According to Nicole Royse, the exhibit “highlights a thought-provoking collection of work from these two talented artists that may appear aesthetically different, but have an undeniable connection and energy that unites their work. Through the raw and expressive work of Pederson combined with the powerful dialogue of Nguyen paintings, this unique pairing of artists is stimulating yet harmonious.”

The opening reception will be from 5pm to 10pm on November 9, but the exhibit will be on display until December 2. It is at the Royse Contemporary Gallery, which you can find at 7077 E. Main Street, Suite 6, Scottsdale, AZ 85251.

The opening will be a part of the Scottsdale ArtWalk in Old Town Scottsdale. Nicole Royse, the owner and curator, will give a brief talk about the artists and work featured in the exhibition; guests will also have the chance to meet the artists. For more information about the exhibition, check out the official press release or visit Royse Contemporary’s website.

#ArtLitPhx: Indigenous Binaries with Eric Gansworth

Eric Gansworth

The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing is proud to present Eric Gansworth in his talk, “Indigenous Binaries: Cultural Survival in Contrast.” The event, which will feature a talk, a Q&A, and a signing, will take place on Thursday, November 9 from 7pm to 9pm at the Heard Museum (2301 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004). The talk is presented as part of the Distinguished Visiting Writer Series. It is open to the public and free.

Gansworth’s work spans across novels, poetry, and memoir and includes If I Ever Get Out of Here, Extra Indians (American Book Award), Mending Skins (PEN Oakland-Josephine Miles Award), and the forthcoming Give Me Some Truth. Gansworth is also an accomplished visual artist, with current exhibitions at Canisius College and the Iroquois Indian Museum.

More information on the talk (and an RSVP) can be found at the Virginia G. Piper Center website, but here is a bit more information about Gansworth’s topic:

Drawing from the tradition of Haudenosaunee belts, which use sequences of purple and white wampum beads to narrate histories, ceremonies, governance, and treaties, Native American writer and visual artist Eric Gansworth (enrolled Onondaga) will discuss the ways his work uses high contrast imagery and storytelling to engage with cultural binaries and explore the complexities of the contemporary indigenous experience. What is the relationship between the painted image and the written word? What are the tensions between Native traditions and popular culture? How do we reconcile America’s past with the present? What does it mean to be a meaningful participant in 21st century indigenous life?

You can also find more information on the event’s Facebook page.

#ArtLitPhx: Phoenix Poetry Series ft. Rashaad Thomas & Joel Salcido

Rashaad Thomas and Joel Salcido

The Phoenix Poetry Series showcases some of the best poets in our community. The newest installment of the series will spotlight Rashaad Thomas and Joel Salcido at Fillmore Coffee Co. (600 North 4th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85004) on Friday, October 27. The event begins at 6pm, and the reading will begin promptly at 6:30pm.

Rashaad Thomas and Joel Salcido make up two thirds of the Gutta’ Collective, which “is a Phoenix-based group committed to sharing a Black and Brown narrative through art and poetry, to giving a voice to the silent, isolated, and marginalized.”

Rashaad Thomas is a husband, father, USAF Veteran, poet, VONA/Voices of Our Nation Art Foundation Alum, and MacDowell Colony Fellow Winter ‘17. His work can be found in a number of publications, most notably in the book Trayvon Martin, Race, and American Justice: Writing Wrong, Columbia Poetry Review, The Rumpus, Heart Journal Online, and others. He is Arizona State University’s Performance in the Borderland’s “Local Opener” Curator in collaboration with the University of Arizona Poetry Center’s Reading and Lecture Series. He is also a contributor to My Click Urban.

Joel Salcido was born a Los Angeles cockroach and smuggled to the Westside of Phoenix, where he translates the poetry of the barrio pigeons into Surrealist prophecies. He is blessed with a beautiful wife and sons, as well as a cadre of talentedly mad brothers, friends, co-conspirators and fellow hood radicals. He writes poetry and prose and is working towards a masters of arts while building a boat out of editor’s rejection letters to float back to the moon. He is also a member of ARTRATs and Chronic Illness.

For more information, please visit the Facebook page.

#ArtLitPhx: ASU MFA Reading Series feat. Steve Abell, Kalani Pickhart, and Jack Geist

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program at Arizona State University is hosting a special 8-part reading series featuring brand new work from ASU graduate students! Each reading will host 3-4 students at The Watershed, a beautiful waterfront restaurant and bar.

Watershed LakeviewThe next installment of the series will take place on November 7 from 7:30pm to 8:30pm, though you can come earlier to mingle, drink, and eat. You can find The Watershed at 5350 S Lakeshore Dr, Tempe, Arizona 85283.

The featured readers for the November 7 event are:

  • Steve Abell, Poetry
  • Kalani Pickhart, Fiction
  • Jack Geist, Poetry

(Update: Natasha Murdock has replaced Jack Geist as the third reader!)

We’re so excited for this installment of the series, especially because Kalani Pickhart was a contributor in Issue 19 of Superstition Review! You can read her piece, “Little Mouse,” here.

Stay tuned for later installments of this reading series! You can find more information on the event’s Facebook page and on the Facebook page for the ASU MFA Program in Creative Writing.

#ArtLitPhx: Legacies – A Conversation with Rita Dove, Sandra Cisneros, and Joy Harjo

Legacies

The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing is excited to announce “LEGACIES: A Conversation with Sandra Cisneros, Rita Dove, and Joy Harjo (Hosted by Natalie Diaz).” The event will take place Saturday, December 2 from 1:30pm to 3:00pm in the Great Hall, Beus Center for Law and Society, Rm. 141, Arizona State University, Downtown Phoenix (111 E Taylor St, Phoenix, AZ 85004).

Although the event itself is December 2, make sure to put this on your radar now! This is a ticketed event, and tickets will become available on Saturday, November 4, at 12pm with a limited waitlist. All tickets are free, and there will be no walk-ins for the event. You can see more details about ticketing on the Eventbrite page, and you can see more details on the event as a whole on the Piper website or the Facebook event page.

This event will be December 2, the day after the trio’s event at the Phoenix Art Museum, which is already sold out. So if you can’t make it to the Phoenix Art Museum event on Friday, December 1, the “Legacies” event is the perfect opportunity to see Joy Harjo, Rita Dove, and Sandra Cisneros in action – just make sure to get your tickets on November 4!

The Piper Center teases, “Three legends come together for the first time to discuss their paths through the American literary landscape.”

Sandra Cisneros is a poet, short story writer, novelist, and essayist whose work explores the lives of the working-class. She has received many awards, including (most recently) Chicago’s Fifth Star Award, the PEN Center USA Literary Award and the National Medal of the Arts, awarded to her by President Obama in 2016. The House on Mango Street has sold over five million copies, been translated into over twenty languages, and is required reading in elementary, high school, and universities across the nation.

Rita Dove is a former U.S. poet laureate, and she received her MFA in 1977 from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop, where she and her classmates Sandra Cisneros and Joy Harjo were the only non-white students at the time. From 1981 to 1989 she taught creative writing at Arizona State University – the final two years as the first and only African-American full professor in ASU’s English Department. Thomas and Beulah, a book she wrote while teaching at ASU, received the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in poetry. She was also the sole editor of The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry (2011). Her most recent book, Collected Poems 1974-2004, received the 2017 NAACP Image Award and was a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award. Among her many other honors are the 2011 National Medal of Arts from President Obama, the 1996 National Humanities Medal from President Clinton (making her the only poet with both national medals), and 25 honorary degrees.

Joy Harjo’s eight books of poetry include Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings, How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, and She Had Some Horses. Harjo’s memoir Crazy Brave won the PEN USA Literary Award for Creative Non-Fiction and the American Book Award. She is the recipient of the 2015 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets for proven mastery in the art of poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the United States Artist Fellowship. In 2014 she was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. A renowned musician, Harjo performs with her saxophone nationally and internationally, solo and with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. She has five award-winning CDs of music, and won a Native American Music Award for Best Female Artist of the Year in 2009.

Legacies is presented by archiTEXTS and the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing with support from the Labriola National American Indian Data Center and the University of Arizona Poetry Center.

#ArtLitPhx: Layli Long Soldier and Timothy Yu at the Phoenix Art Museum

Layli Long Soldier and Timothy YuThe University of Arizona Poetry Center is proud to present poets Layli Long Soldier and Timothy Yu at the Phoenix Art Museum (1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004) on Friday, November 3 at 7pm. Both poets will read from their works, and then there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

The local opener is Bojan Louis, who is a member of the Navajo Nation. His first collection of poems, Currents, published in 2017 from BkMk Press. He is also the author of a nonfiction chapbook, Troubleshooting Silence in Arizona, released by Guillotine Series in 2012. Louis is currently Poetry Editor at RED INK: An International Journal of Indigenous Literature, Arts, and Humanities.

Layli Long Soldier is Oglala Lakota; her family is from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, and northwestern Idaho. Her first chapbook of poetry, Chromosomory, released in 2009 from Q Ave Press. She received a BFA in Creative Writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts, and she is a two-time recipient of the Truman Capote Creative Writing Fellowship. She is also a recipient of the 2009 Naropa University Poetry Scholarship. She has served as editor-in-chief for “Native Language Network” and other publications for the Indigenous Language Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Timothy Yu’s debut poetry collection, 100 Chinese Silences (2016), was the Editor’s Selection in the NOS Book Contest from Les Figues Press. He is also the author of three chapbooks: 15 Chinese Silences (Tinfish); Journey to the West (Barrow Street), winner of the Vincent Chin Memorial Chapbook Prize from Kundiman; and, with Kristy Odelius, Kiss the Stranger (Corollary). He is also the author of Race and the Avant-Garde: Experimental and Asian American Literature since 1965 (Stanford) and the editor of Nests and Strangers: On Asian American Women Poets (Kelsey Street).

For this event, the Poetry Center is proud to partner with the Phoenix Art Museum with support from the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing as a lead sponsor, as well as additional support from the ASU Creative Writing Program, the Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Chair in Modern and Contemporary Poetry, the Literary & Prologue Society, and Superstition Review.

For more information, check out the event’s Facebook page.