Contributor Update: A Whole New World Awaits You With Sarah Kriehn

Hey all, this week brings us a lil’ closer to home with the news that there will be an artist reception at our very own Herberger Theater Art Gallery, right here in Arizona. The show will be featuring the work of Sarah Kriehn, a past contributor to Superstition Review whose paintings were featured in the Art section of our 10th issue. Her work will be appearing alongside work by Kathy Taylor, and the reception is to be held Friday, April 7th, on the 2nd floor of the Herberger Art Theater Gallery, at 222 E Monroe, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm. Come through and marvel at the work these two wonderful artists have done, and when you’re done, drop us a line in the comments section below!

Go to this show!

The digital flier for Sarah Kriehn’s artist reception, held Friday, April 7th at Herberger Theater Art Gallery.

 

Contributor Update: Barbara Crooker

Hey there, readers! In the most recent bit of good news that’s floated by Superstition Review’s open windowsill, we are immensely pleased to announce that past contributor Barbara Crooker has a new book out called “Les Fauves,” which has been published by C&R Press. “Les Fauves” is a collection of ekphrastic poems that utilize the works of the Fauve and Post-Impressionist in order to move through the world, both as it is given and as it is withheld. Crooker’s poetry was featured in the Poetry section of our second issue, and can be viewed here. Go check out some reviews and order yourself a copy of “Les Fauves” here. A hearty congratulations to Barbara Crooker, and as always, feel free to let us know what you all liked about “Les Fauves,” as well as the rest of Crooker’s poetry, in the comments section down below.

Buy this book!

The cover for Barbara Crooker’s new book of poems, “Les Fauves.”

Contributor Update: Chelsea Dingman

Chelsea DingmanWe’re so excited to report that Chelsea Dingman’s first full-length book, Thaw, is forthcoming from the University of Georgia Press (2017) and will be published this fall. Thaw was chosen by Allison Joseph to win the National Poetry Series in 2016, and the University of Southern Florida reports that Ms. Joseph described the book as “beautifully wrought and, dare I say, heartfelt…Dingman is not afraid to move emotions here, there and everywhere.”

Thaw by Chelsea DingmanThe University of Southern Florida, where Chelsea teaches, shares more details about Thaw:

“The imagery of her poems explores the invitation and impermanence of landscapes. The book is loosely based on Dingman’s childhood and grounded in the landscapes of western Canada, although the experiences of the narrator are imagined. Florida is also represented in the book when the speaker moves and a question of personal exile arises.”

In her upcoming Authors Talk podcast, which will go live April 28, Chelsea says, “In writing Thaw, I feel like it’s been a book that I’ve been trying to write for 20 years.” She also shares:

“It [Thaw] explores the issues of family violence, poverty, kinship, death, abuse, and grief…It also explores the speaker’s roles as mother, child, daughter, wife, sister, and citizen, and how family can sometimes be the thing that keeps us sane, while other times it can be the thing we run from.”

You can access Chelsea’s poems in Issue 18 of Superstition Review. You can also stay updated with Chelsea’s website.

Contributor Update: Adam Houle Brings It Home With “Stray”

Good afternoon! Superstition Review is elated to announce that past contributor Adam Houle’s first book, titled “Stray” will be dropping March 21st from the good folks over at Lithic Press. Lauded by press and peers alike, “Stray” features an updated version of one of Houle’s poems that were featured in the Poetry section of Issue 9, which can all be found here. Go pre-order your copy of “Stray” right here, right now, and behold the wonders of Houle’s poetry!

Buy this book!

The cover art for Adam Houle’s first book “Stray,” forthcoming from Lithic Press.

Contributor Update: Victor Lodato Waxes Romantic In The Times

Hey there dear readers! Superstition Review is back after a brief hiatus with more good news: past contributor Victor Lodato’s essay “When Your Greatest Romance Is a Friendship” has been published in The New York Times‘ “Modern Love” column. Lodato was featured in our Interview section of Issue 8 in an interview conducted by former intern Marie Lazaro. In addition to being a recipient of the PEN Center USA Award for fiction, Victor Lodato has also been the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Institute as well as the National Endowment for the Arts.  His latest novel, “Edgar and Lucy” is out now from Macmillan, and can be found both online as well as at most major bookstores. Do yourself a favor and check out the essay here, and buy one (or two, or seven) copies of “Edgar and Lucy” here. Congratulations Victor, we couldn’t be happier to know you!

Read the essay and buy the book!

Victor Lodato, author of “When Your Greatest Romance Is a Friendship” and “Edgar and Lucy.”

Contributor Update: Ruben Quesada Brings His Talents To The UCLA Extension This Summer

Hey readers! Superstition Review is proud to announce that Ruben Quesada, a former faculty member at Eastern Illinois University who was featured in the Poetry section of Issue 13, has been named a faculty member at the UCLA Extension, and will be teaching a course on Poetry and Popular Culture alongside Rosebud Ben-Oni this summer. Do yourself a favor, and check out Ruben Quesada’s poem “On Witness” here, and stay tuned to the blog for more updates on the beautiful happenings here at Superstition Review.

Ruben Quesada, featured in the Poetry Section of Issue 13, will be teaching at the UCLA Extension this summer!

Ruben Quesada, featured in the Poetry Section of Issue 13, will be teaching at the UCLA Extension this summer!

Contributor Update: BJ Hollars

Hello, readers! We are happy to announce that B.J. Hollars, a contributor featured in the Fiction Section of our 6th issue, has written a new book available here, titled Flock Together. A chapter preview is available here and provides a sobering glance at the ivory-billed woodpecker, now gone due to deforestation. The book follows a journey to investigate many of America’s now extinct bird population. Flock Together cover art

From Hollars’ website:

After stumbling upon a book of photographs depicting extinct animals, B.J. Hollars became fascinated by the creatures that are no longer with us; specifically, extinct North American birds. How, he wondered, could we preserve so beautifully on film what we’ve failed to preserve in life? And so begins his yearlong journey to find out, one that leads him from bogs to art museums, from archives to Christmas Counts, until he at last comes as close to extinct birds as he ever will during a behind-the-scenes visit at the Chicago Field Museum. Heartbroken by the birds we’ve lost, Hollars takes refuge in those that remain. Armed with binoculars, a field guide, and knowledgeable friends, he begins his transition from budding birder to environmentally conscious citizen, a first step on a longer journey toward understanding the true tragedy of a bird’s song silenced forever.

Told with charm and wit, Flock Together is a remarkable memoir that shows how “knowing” the natural world—even just a small part—illuminates what it means to be a global citizen and how only by embracing our ecological responsibilities do we ever become fully human. A moving elegy to birds we’ve lost, Hollars’s exploration of what we can learn from extinct species will resonate in the minds of readers long beyond the final page.