Rachel Blau DuPlessis, poet and essayist, coming to ASU

Rachel Blau DePlessisJOIN DuPLESSIS FOR TWO EVENTS ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 

  • MFA Reading Series Event: 12-1 p.m. in SS-109
  • Afternoon Lecture: “Manifesting Literary Feminisms: A Conversation with Rachel Blau DuPlessis,” at 4:30 p.m. in SS-109. The lecture is co-sponsored by the School of Social Transformation, the Institute for Humanities Research, the Department of English, the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, and the Office of the Associate Dean of Faculty.

Rachel Blau DuPlessis (Ph.D., Columbia University, 1970) is known as a poet and essayist, and as a critic and scholar with a special interest in modern and contemporary poetry. From 1986 until 2012, DuPlessis has been engaged in a long poem project, collected in several book-length installments from Wesleyan University Press and Salt Publishing. The newest book, Surge: Drafts 96-114 (Salt 2013), brings this 26-year long poem to a temporary fold.

Another key critical book by DuPlessis is Genders, Races, and Religious Cultures in Modern American Poetry, 1908-1934. DuPlessis was a Distinguished Visitor in the English Department at the University of Auckland, has held an appointment to the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, and was awarded a residency for poetry at Bellagio, sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation.

ASU

The English Department is an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

SR Pod/Vod Series: Poet Annah Browning

Annah BrowningAnnah Browning received her M.F.A. in poetry writing from Washington University in St. Louis. She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in English at The University of Illinois-Chicago, where she teaches composition and poetry writing. Her work has appeared in The Southeast Review, Anti-, The Kenyon Review Online, The Bellingham Review, Harpur Palate, DIAGRAM, Word For/Word, and Sixth Finch, among other journals. Her chapbook-length sequence, The Inheritors, is viewable for free online through The White Whale Review.

Annah Browning’s Website

You can read along with her poems in issue 10 of Superstition Review.

To subscribe to our iTunes U channel, go to http://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/superstition-review-online/id552593273

 

Advice from Wingbeats Co-Editor, Scott Wiggerman

Wingbeats, photo courtesy of Dos Gatos Press.

If writing better poetry is on your list of New Year’s resolutions, then you’ll want to take a look into Scott Wiggerman and David Meischen’s new book, Wingbeats. Wiggerman and Meischen, an SR contributor from Issue 7, have compiled the wisdom and advice of 58 poets in order to create exercises that showcase the poetry writing process.

As a poet and former Poetry Columnist for the Texas Writer, Scott Wiggerman is no stranger to the world of  poetry. He has conducted a number of workshops for the WLT Poetry Study Group and his work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Wiggerman found he kept returning to poetry staples, like The Practice of Poetry (edited by Robin Behn and Chase Twichell), for reference, but what he really needed was something new that applied the same variety of techniques. Wiggerman writes that he was looking for something that “combined exercises and essays by poets who actually teach, both academics and non-academics, this time.  Since it didn’t seem to be forthcoming from anywhere, I asked my partner about creating and publishing such a book. I foolishly thought it would be a project that I could handle alone, but David came on board as co-editor almost immediately, thank goodness!”

From the simplest activities to the more involved tasks, Wingbeats provides aspiring poets with exercises along with real poems that show what these look like in action. “We wanted to create a book that poets would actually use, and I wanted a book that would work well for poets both in MFA programs and those, like myself and several of our Wingbeats contributors, who learn the craft of poetry on their own or through the occasional workshop,” wrote Wiggerman.

Wiggerman and Meischen’s new book not only covers standard poetic techniques, but also new strategies for revision, collaboration, and inspiration. If you’re looking for some hands-on experience in writing poetry, Wingbeats is a great resource.

Wiggerman also recommends that aspiring poets seek out workshops and writing groups for guidance: “The absolute best way to learn how to write is to write–and many books or MFA programs can ‘teach’ you this. But it takes feedback as well, and for this, one needs someone to share his or her work with. Of course, it also helps tremendously to read poetry. One of the adages of writing is to ‘show, don’t tell,’ and while Wingbeats does tell, it also shows through poem after poem. It’s the way I like to teach my workshops, letting poems speak for themselves by showing how they’re done.”

You can learn more about Wingbeats on the Dos Gatos Press website or on their new  Facebook page.

Poetry Reading: Revolutionized

Online literary magazine websites have made great use of modern technology and offer poetry lovers a unique audio listening experience. From the convenience of a home computer or laptop and with the download of Flash or Real Player, users can browse through online audio collections and listen to online poetry readings by published authors. Two online literary magazines that are dedicated to delivering audio reading experience are Fishouse and The Courtland Review.

Fishousepoems.org
Oral tradition of poetry reading

Since 2004, Fishousepoems.org has added to an archive that now exceeds 500 audio files of poetry readings by published and emerging poets. Fishouse modernized the oral tradition of poetry reading with audio recordings and other media to provide the public with access to the voices of poets. Their website also provides an educational and cultural resource to students and instructors of contemporary poetry.

All featured poets have an audio archive of their creative works and also discuss their experiences with writing such as: form, translation, voice discovery, favorite poems, advice for young poets, becoming a poet, and their current projects. The audio readings allow the poet to invoke emotion in their work.

The Courtland Review

The Courtland Review was founded in 1997 in Courtland, New York and currently has 52 issues. They adhere to the theme of “Poetry is an oral art” and began an audio series of authors’ works in 2006.

Through the years they have added to their archives by recording earlier published works from the late ’90s. The Courtland Review has improved upon the written text by allowing readers to follow along with the voice of the poet, thereby creating an intimate connection between poet and audience. Besides the audio readings, The Courtland Review also publishes short fiction through submission.

April is National Poetry Month

official National Poetry Month poster from poets.org

The art of poetry has been around pretty much as long as there have been words. Finally in 1996, Poetry was given its own month. That’s right, April is National Poetry Month, a month to celebrate poetry and poets and their impact on American culture. National Poetry Month was established by the Academy of American Poets, an organization that supports American poets and fosters the appreciation of contemporary poetry, in 1996. During this month the Academy of American Poets wants to especially increase the visibility and availability of poetry in popular culture and highlight the legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets. One of the top goals is to introduce more Americans to the pleasures of reading poetry. My questions for our readers:

What pleasures do you gain from reading poetry?

Do you do anything specific to celebrate National Poetry Month? If so, what?

What role do you think poets play in American culture?

The Academy of American Poets lists 30 ways to celebrate National Poetry Month. You can find them all listed here.

One of my favorite options is “poem in your pocket day.”  The idea is to carry one of your favorite poems with you all day. I think this is a great concept to do in general. Glancing at a poem throughout the day can give you the strength, inspiration and motivation to get through the day or to even write a poem yourself. For National Poetry Month I aim to carry a poem in my pocket at least twice a week.

Anyone else have any National Poetry Month goals?

ASU Lecturer Patricia Murphy Poetry Reading @ Urban Beans

Urban Beans, a coffee shop located in Midtown Phoenix, is a great place to grab an exceptional cup of locally roasted coffee, smoothies, tea, pastries or a tasty lunch. It’s also a great place to hang out and listen to local poets. This Friday night, that’s tomorrow, Urban Beans is hosting a poetry reading and ASU Lecturer and alum Particia Murphy will be reading.

Patricia Murphy earned her MFA in Poetry from Arizona State University where she has been teaching writing for 18 years. Her work has received awards from the Associated Writing Programs and the Academy of American Poets, Glimmer Train PressThe GSU Review, and The Southern California Review. She teaches several writing classes including Poetry, Blogging, Travel Writing and Publishing in Literary Magazines.

Her reading will be this Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m. Stop by, get a delicious coffee with a little heart in it, and stay for the reading. Map here.

The Mercury Building
3508 N. 7th Street
Suite 100
Phoenix, AZ 85014
602.595.2244

Franz Wright Reading

It’s finally here! Tomorrow, Superstition Review and the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing are hosting a reading with Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Franz Wright!

Franz Wright, born in Austria and educated at Oberlin College, received the Pulitzer Prize in 2004 for his book of poetry Walking to Martha’s Vineyard. Critics have praised Wright for his poetry, exclaiming that “Wright oscillates between direct and evasive dictions, between the barroom floor and the arts club podium, from aphoristic aside to icily poetic abstraction.” The Boston Review has said of Wright’s poetry; “among the most honest, haunting, and human being written today.” Other works by Wright include Wheeling Motel, God’s Silence, The Beforelife, Going North in Winter, and many others.

The reading and book signing will be held on Tuesday, April 20th at the Pima Auditorium (Room 230) in the Memorial Union at 7:30 p.m.

The following day, April 21, a public craft Q&A will be held at 11:00 a.m. at the Piper Writers House on the ASU Tempe campus.