Authors Talk: Kalani Pickhart

Today we are pleased to to feature author Kalani Pickhart as our Authors Talk series contributor. Kalani discusses the process and personal significance of “Little Mouse.” She concludes by offering a piece of advice for other young writers.

Kalani explains that “Little Mouse” is her first story that “did a lot with very, very little.” She explains her immediate affinity for this method because it allows the characters’ voices to be communicated more directly. Characters revealing themselves and being heard on their own terms and in their own tone is Kalani’s first priority. This is clear from her language throughout the talk.

You can read and listen to “Little Mouse” in Superstition Review, Issue 19.

Authors Talk: Douglas Manuel

Today we are pleased to feature poet Douglas Manuel as our Authors Talk series contributor. His talk is a reading of the lyrical essay that he wrote reflecting on his poem, “Who’s Little Boy Are You?”

The poem’s title comes from a question in James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, that points at belonging and ‘fissures between the messages of the uplifting Black church and street survival tactics’ that are “crucial to understanding the Black experience in America.” What follows is a deeply personal rumination from Douglas about his father and who belongs to whom, if anyone ever really does. Finally, Douglas reflects on the way that he represents his father in other poems including “Little Fires Left by Travelers.”

You can read and listen to both of Douglas’s aforementioned poems in Superstition Review Issue 19.

Authors Talk: Emily Townsend

Today we are pleased to feature author Emily Townsend as our Authors Talk series contributor. Emily speaks about finding her place in creative nonfiction, her “arbitrary” research process, and her complicated relationship with honeybees.

Emily captures the beauty of nonfiction writing concisely by noting its unique ability to allow writers to “untangling facts that [are] often left undiscovered.” Her podcast ranges from eloquent tidbits to candidly pointing out personal weaknesses in a way that makes the recording just as engaging and thought-provoking as her essay.

You can read Emily’s essay and hear her read it aloud in Superstition Review Issue 17.

Authors Talk: Maureen Seaton

Today we are pleased to feature poet Maureen Seaton as our Authors Talk series contributor. Maureen speaks about the way that her poems began and her love of poetic form.

Maureen describes her poems as “fraternal twins” that were born from a state of shock after her first bout with breast cancer. She notes her future’s ambiguity asking “I wonder what I would be today if….” That ambiguity is reflected in the poems’ simultaneous “straightforwardness” and complexity, their connection and their difference. The surface differences are in full view in the poems’ forms, which Maureen discusses.

You can read and listen to Maureen’s poems in Issue 19.

Authors Talk: Jonathan Cardew

Today we are pleased to feature author Jonathan Cardew as our Authors Talk series contributor. Jonathan discusses the work experiences that let “The Story of the Elephant” and its characters come to him.

Jonathan speaks intriguingly about what draws him to flash fiction. He notes his love for ellipses and the fact that anything can happen even after the end of such a short story, that the story “could be about anything or nothing.”

If you’d like to develop your own theory, you can read and listen to Jonathan’s story in Superstition Review Issue 19.

Authors Talk: Bill Sommer

Today we are pleased to feature author Bill Sommer as our Authors Talk series contributor. Bill discusses his writing process and inspiration for “The Haircut” as well as “breaking your own rules.”

“The Haircut” was written in between drafts of a novel when Bill was struck by Ruth Ozeki’s experience writing about her face (which you can read here). Wanting to capitalize on the chance to write something short, Bill set out to write only one scene. As he went about this self-imposed challenge and eventually “failed” he discovered the limits of rules and the limitless potential of stories.

You can read and listen to Bill’s story in Superstition Review Issue 19.

Authors Talk: Amber Burke

Today we are pleased to feature author Amber Gross as our Authors Talk series contributor. She speaks about the similarities between writing and acting. Experience and emotion and how they manifest in concrete ways lend themselves to both in her craft.

You can read Amber’s short story, “Shooting Day” here.