#ArtLitPhx: ASU Art Museum: Beyond Beyond Exhibition

#ArtLitPhx

 

Exhibition runs June 23 through Sept. 29

Time: 11:00am-5pm

Event Description:

“Beyond Beyond” is a solo exhibition of Ai Kijima, a contemporary artist whose riotous collages of figures, patterns and colors are made from meticulously pieced and fused textiles.

In her work from the early 2000s, she used scraps of bed sheets, curtains, clothing and dish towels collected from thrift stores to create artworks that depict a variety of characters ranging from American cartoons to Japanese anime. Born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, Kijima is fascinated by the patterns and imagery of fabrics from around the globe.

“Beyond Beyond” reflects Kijima’s interest in how the melding of traditional craft and popular imagery reflects a culture’s history, preoccupations and social politics.

Supported by the Windgate Charitable Foundation as part of the Windgate Contemporary Craft Initiative at ASU Art Museum.

Visit the museum website for directions and hours and information about bringing classes to tour exhibitions or meet with curators.

Image credit: Ai Kijima, “Rebel to the End,” 2012. Mixed media, 54-by-65 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

#ArtLitPhx: ASU Art Museum: Family Day

ArtLitPhxASU Art Museum: Family Day

July 14 10 am-4 pm

Location: ASU Art Museum, 51 E 1oth St, Tempe, Arizona 85281

Event description: Spend a full day with us making, learning and playing. At ASU Art Museum’s Family Days, art stations are set up throughout our galleries for children and families — or anyone else interested in art-making! Activities revolve around current exhibitions and many are led by local artists.

This Family Day, we will be joined by Miguel Cardona, Rachel Goodwin and Estrella Payton. You’ll also get to see a sneak peek of our upcoming exhibition “Indwelling,” as artist Yuri Kobayashi works in the galleries on her installation.

#ArtLitPhx: Curator Chat: ‘A Dream on a Dream’ with Julio César Morales

Join curator Julio César Morales  in a conversation about what contemporary art and the news have in common as seen in the new exhibition “A Dream on A Dream: Encounter with Claudio Dicochea.

ASU Art Museum’s curator chats offer an opportunity for visitors to get the inside scoop on exhibitions without the formality of a traditional lecture setting. Guests will spend 30 minutes walking around the exhibition and talking about the art with one of the museum’s curators. Questions and comments are highly encouraged.

The Curator Chat will be held Wednesday February 21 at 12:30 pm in the ASU Art Museum (51 E 10th St, Tempe).

 

ASU Art Museum Presents Participant: Photographs by Spencer Tunick from the Stéphane Janssen Collection

Spencer_Tunick_Munich_3_Bayerische_Staatsoper_2011

Spencer Tunick, “Munich 3 (Bayerische Staatsoper),” 2011. Image courtesy of the artist and Stéphane Janssen.

Tempe, Ariz. — On Jan. 14, 2016, the Arizona State University Art Museum (10th Street and Mill) opens the exhibition Participant: Photographs by Spencer Tunick from the Stéphane Janssen Collection, which includes more than 20 photographs by Spencer Tunick from 1997 to 2013 drawn from the collection of Stéphane Janssen. The exhibition will be on view through May 28, 2016.

Since the early 1990s, Tunick has traveled the globe to create staged images of multiple nude figures in public settings. And since 2000, collector Stéphane Janssen has been a participant in Tunick’s photographs, which have ranged from a handful of figures in an art museum to more than 1,000 volunteers in the Dead Sea in Israel.

Janssen, who is now 80, posed for the first time on a street in Harlem, New York, with 25 other people. Most recently, Janssen was one of 1,000 people covered from head to toe in dramatic red and gold body paint in front of the opera house in Munich, Germany, a project commissioned to coincide with the presentation of Richard Wagner’s operas Der Ring Des Nibelungen, also known as the Ring Cycle.

All of Tunick’s participants are volunteers who respond to an open call to appear at a time and place. They are carefully arranged and then photographed by the artist. The gathered human bodies sometimes recede, sometimes dominate the built and natural backdrops. They meld into a unified composition of abstract patterns and challenge conceptions of nudity, privacy and the ideal body.

These human installations combine elements of performance art, sculpture, land art and photography. They also reference street art and flash mobs, which bring temporary art and experiences into the public space, expanding the reach and impact of the work. Tunick’s art practice explores the social, political and legal issues surrounding art in the public sphere.

The exhibition and the accompanying artist’s book are generously supported by Stéphane Janssen. The book is available in the Museum Store or from http://www.nakedpavementbooks.com/.

Exhibition Events

Tunick will give a gallery talk Wednesday, Jan. 13, at 1:30p.m., and both Tunick and Janssen will attend the exhibition opening Thursday, Jan. 14, from 5–7 p.m.

About the ASU Art Museum

The ASU Art Museum, named “the single most impressive venue for contemporary art in Arizona” by Art in America magazine, is part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. The museum has three locations across the metro Phoenix area: the ASU Art Museum at 10th Street and Mill Avenue, on ASU’s Tempe campus; the ASU Art Museum Brickyard at 7th Street and Mill Avenue, in downtown Tempe; and the ASU Art Museum International Artist Residency Program Project Space at Combine Studios, in downtown Phoenix.

Admission

Free at all three locations

Hours

The ASU Art Museum and ASU Art Museum Brickyard are open 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. on Tuesdays, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. The museum is closed on Sundays and Mondays.

To learn more about the museum, call 480.965.2787, or visit asuartmuseum.asu.edu.

 

Contemporary Mexican Photography: Existe lo que tiene nombre Now on Exhibition at ASU Art Museum

Tempe, Ariz. – The ASU Art Museum is pleased to present Contemporary Mexican Photography: Existe lo que tiene nombre, an exhibition comprised of more than 50 photographic and video works produced by 23 different artists, all within the past decade. It will be on view through Jan. 9, 2016 in the lower level galleries at the ASU Art Museum’s Mill Avenue & 10th Street location in Tempe. The exhibition is the U.S. debut for many of the exhibiting photographers.

Contemporary Mexican Photography: Existe lo que tiene nombre was curated and first presented in April 2015 at San Francisco Camerawork and Galeria de la Raza by Sergio De La Torre (San Francisco) and Javier Ramírez Limón (Tijuana). The ASU Art Museum presentation of the exhibition is managed by Julio Cesar Morales and is supported by the Helme Prinzen Endowment.

art-gallery-1252116The title of the exhibition, Existe lo que tiene nombre, which translates to “that which has a name exists,” comes from a conversation with the artist Jazzibe Santos, whose photographic project documents her grandmother’s household of labeled objects. Santos’ project is included in the exhibition alongside the work of Adela Goldbard, Aglea Cortés, Alejandra Laviada, Alejandro Cartagena, Alfredo Káram, Bruno Ruiz, Carlos Iván Hernández, Colectivo Estética Unisex, Daniela Edburg, David Vera, Fernando Brito, Iván Manríquez, Jimena Camou, Juan Carlos Coppel, Livia Corona, Mariela Sancari, Mauricio Alejo, Melba Arellano, Oswaldo Ruiz, Pablo López Luz, Roberto Molina Tondopó, and Yvonne Venegas.

“Since the late 1800s to the documentation of the Mexican Revolution, photography in Mexico has played an important role in capturing and developing the identity of ‘Mexicaness,’ or the state of being Mexican,” says Morales. “Contemporary artists have always helped create a national visual language for Mexico that historically has been fluid and transformative in nature. Existe lo que tiene nombre is a rare and powerful look into the contemporary practices of Mexican artists working within a photographic influence.”

The exhibition attempts to expand the traditional terrain and focus of photography by looking at how contemporary artists are placing the photographic image at the center in their practice and how artists are using discretionary ways of working with the medium itself, explains Morales. “The artworks in Existe lo que tiene nombre concentrate on the dissolution of historic borders in photography between notions of the ‘documentary,’ ‘experimental’ and ‘conceptual.’”

Existe lo que tiene nombre is part of the Contact Zones series of exhibitions at the ASU Art Museum which focuses on contemporary migration and its intricate uncertainties within border culture, destiny and contested histories. The series includes new commission-based video installations, public engaged programs, guest-curated exhibitions and artist initiated projects.

Related Programs

Julio Cesar Morales will also lead a tour of the exhibition as part of the museum’s #ThirdWednesday series on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. An opening reception for the exhibition will be held Friday, September 11, from 6:30–8:30 p.m. (with a members, alumni and press preview from 5:30–6:30 p.m.).

Exhibition Catalogue

A 180-page catalogue with 56 color plates will accompany the exhibition. The publication includes essays by Mexican art critic Irving Dominguez and curators Sergio De La Torre and Javier Ramirez Limon.

 Credit

This exhibition is curated by Sergio De La Torre (San Francisco) and Javier Ramírez Limón (Tijuana) and is supported by the University of San Francisco, The San Francisco Arts Commission, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The ASU Art Museum presentation is supported by the Helme Prinzen Endowment.  Following the ASU Art Museum’s presentation of the exhibition, it will travel to Centro de las Artes Universidad de Sonora and El Centro Cultural Tijuana.

 About the ASU Art Museum

The ASU Art Museum, named “the single most impressive venue for contemporary art in Arizona” by Art in America magazine, is part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. The museum has three locations across the metro Phoenix area: the ASU Art Museum at 10th Street and Mill Avenue, on ASU’s Tempe campus; the ASU Art Museum Brickyard at 7th Street and Mill Avenue, in downtown Tempe; and the ASU Art Museum International Artist Residency Program Project Space at Combine Studios, in downtown Phoenix.

Admission: Free at all three locations

Hours: The ASU Art Museum and ASU Art Museum Brickyard are open 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The museum is closed on Sundays and Mondays.

To learn more about the museum, call 480.965.2787, or visitasuartmuseum.asu.edu.

Jeanne (Juno) Schaser

Communications Program Coordinator