#ArtLitPhx: Terrence Hayes Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Friday, February, 5th at 7pm the Uni11896064_10154266775104896_6342325946509938126_nversity of Arizona Poetry Center, ASU Creative Writing, Superstition Review, and ASU: Performance in the Borderlands are co-sponsoring a reading by Terrance Hayes at the Phoenix Art Museum. The reading is open to the public, and more information can be found here.

Terrance Hayes, author of How to Be Drawn, was a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award, the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award, and the 2015 NAACP Image Award for Poetry.

How to Be Drawn is Hayes’ fifth collection.. Founding editor of Superstition Review, Patricia Murphy says of reading the book, “I left feeling better informed about how others walk around in this world.”

How to Be Drawn is for everyone, it is a meditation on family, relationships, history, socioeconomic structure, and everything in between. Hayes writes very personal poems in his latest collection but manages to make them by some means ubiquitous and universal for his readers. The lines from the opening poem, “What It Look Like” read

 

“…don’t you lie/about who you are sometimes and then realize/the lie is true? You are blind to your power, Brother/Bastard like the king who wanders his kingdom searching for the king.”
Hayes keeps up the pace throughout, surprising the reader line by line, poem by poem.

–Eli Tubbs

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Terrance Hayes is the author of Lighthead (Penguin 2010), winner of the 2010 National Book Award, and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books are Wind in a Box (Penguin 2006), Hip Logic (Penguin 2002), and Muscular Music (Tia Chucha Press, 1999). His honors include a Whiting Writers Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a United States Artists Zell Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship.  How To Be Drawn (Penguin 2015), his most recent  collection of poems, was a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award, the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award, and the 2015 NAACP Image Award for Poetry.

Tempe Community Writing and Cover Design Contest

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Arizona State University and Tempe Public Library are partnering once again to host the second annual Tempe Community Writing and Cover Design Contest. The contest first launched a year ago as a collaboration between Arizona State University’s College of Letters and Sciences, the writing programs in the Department of English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Tempe Public Library.

“We had a fantastic response for the first contest, receiving 190 writing submissions — many from ASU students,” said Tempe Public Library adult-services librarian Jill Brenner, who teamed up with Jeanne Hanrahan, faculty associate and liaison for ASU Academic Success Programs, to organize the contest.

Last year’s winning contributions included imaginative, expressive poetry; fiction that ran the continuum from funny to fear-inducing; and memoir writing that took readers into some of life’s most fragile emotional spaces — from nurturing premature babies to health, to helping hospice patients die with grace.

Tempe residents, Tempe Public Library cardholders, high school students, and ASU students are invited to submit one work of poetry, short fiction, or creative nonfiction (including essays and memoirs). There is also an opportunity for designers to submit one 9.5-inch by 6.5-inch vertical color design for both online and print publication. Submissions for both portions of the contest will be be open until February 15th. 

Writing contest entries are read anonymously by members of the ASU creative writing community, and winners will be chosen from each genre for the three entry categories: high school student, college student, and community adult. In addition to having their work published in volume two of the printed Tempe Writers Forum and on the library’s website, the winners will be celebrated at a reception event at Tempe Public Library in the spring.

For more information on the contest and submission details, visit Tempe Public Library’s website. 

Writing Workshop with Mary Sojourner: Writing the Forbidden

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 2.31.51 AMAuthor Mary Sojourner will be hosting a one-day Creative Nonfiction and Fiction workshop at the Piper House at Arizona State University on Saturday, January 16 from 10am to 5pm. 

“The Forbidden is a chimera, a shape-shifter. A woman writing during the seven hundred years of the Inquisition could be killed simply for writing anything. Books were once banned for sexual content. Sexual content now sells everything.

Our family, ethnic group, gender and culture impose sanctions against the forbidden. But the deepest rules about what we may or may not write lie within us. We have been and are forbidden to write about our sexuality, our fear, the realities of our aging, our loneliness, our secret delight.

You know what you have longed to write and feared to write. For six hours, we will work with writing exercises and support to bring out The Forbidden. We will work in strict confidentiality. I am a writer who works always from Place – within and outside. I know what I have felt when I have broken the rule: You can’t write about that.”

For more information or to register, click here.

Can’t make the workshop? Mary Sojourner also provides weekly writing tips, challenges, prompts, and exercises through her website.