Intern Update, H. Rae Monk: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at ASU

H. Rae MonkToday we are proud to announce that past fiction editor, H. Rae Monk, won an Osher Lifelong Learning Institute scholarship. Rae is a student in the new MA in Narrative Studies at Arizona State University, and past fiction editor for Superstition Review’s Issue 19. She is currently working on a project with the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, which will enable OLLI students to connect with traditional ASU students through shared narratives. The project will encourage students to share true stories about their lives with classmates in order to strengthen empathy and open communication across generational divides

Way to go, Rae!

#ArtLitPhx: Book Release/Reading: Nobody is Ever Missing with Cody Wilson

#ArtLitPhxDate: Monday, June 4, 2018- 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Location: Crescent Ballroom, 302 N 2nd Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003
Cost: Free

Local poet Cody Wilson reads from his newly released chapbook, Nobody Is Ever Missing Monday, June 4, 2018 in the lounge at Crescent Ballroom (302 N 2nd Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003) with special guests Jesse Sensibar and Jennifer Battisti.

Readings begin at 6:45pm. Book signing and frivolity after. To pre-order, visit https://tolsunbooks.com/books/.

While encouraged, RSVPs are purely for the purpose of attendance monitoring and gauging interest. You do not need to bring your registration or RSVP to the event. You do not need to register or RSVP to attend. This event is open to the public and free.

Hosted by Tolsun Books in partnership with the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University.

About the Book:

“Cody Wilson has a great feel for the details that speak of what hides below the surface. There’s a deeply human mix here – he celebrates, worries, remembers, and looks ahead – and a feeling that he’s trying to enact the multitude of woundings and survivals that have shaped who he is. This book is a beautiful reminder of the joy and risk surrounding us every day.”
—Bob Hicok

“Cody Wilson’s debut collection of poems, like grief, finds harmony in the evening’s melody. Nobody Is Ever Missing is an asthmatic lungful of secrets that settles in the negative space that embraced loved ones who were reduced to the dust that makes breathing difficult.”
—Shawnte Orion, author of The Existentialist Cookbook

Nobody Is Ever Missing reminds us of a difficult yet brilliant truth; oftentimes light can only be realized after it reaches into the darkness. Navigating itself far away from the sentimental, multifaceted lines reflect out from Cody Wilson’s debut chapbook as he explores love and loss and the other palpable experiences that make life into living.

About the Author(s):

Cody Wilson teaches English in Arizona, where he lives with his wife. They are expecting their first son this summer. He has an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte, where he served as poetry editor of QU. He enjoys making things with his hands, including wooden furniture, shadow puppets, and gestures of approval or disapproval. He has recent poems published in Juked, Juxtaprose, Southampton Review and forthcoming in Emrys. 

Jennifer Battisti, a Las Vegas native, studied creative writing at the College of Southern Nevada. Her work has appeared in the anthology, Legs of Tumbleweed, Wings of Lace, and is forthcoming in Where We Live, an anthology of writing and art in response to the October 1st tragedy, as well as The Desert Companion, Minerva Rising, The Citron Review, FLARE, Helen: A Literary magazine,The Red Rock Review, 300 Days of Summer and elsewhere. In 2016 Nevada Public Radio interviewed her about her poetry. She holds a leadership position on the Las Vegas Poets Organization and is the administer and a participating teaching artist for the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project in Nevada. Her first chapbook of poetry, “Echo Bay,” was published in 2018 by Tolsun Books.

Jesse Sensibar is unafraid to die but terrified of dying alone. He loves big bore handguns with short barrels; the clean, uncluttered lines of old outlaw choppers, old pawn jewelry, and small fuzzy critters with equal abandon. He has a soft spot in his heart for The Virgin of Guadalupe, tide pools, house cats, quiet bars, innocent strippers, and jaded children. He has worked as a mechanic, heavy equipment operator, strip club bouncer, repossession agent, tattoo shop owner, private investigator, tow truck driver, snow plow operator, wildland firefighter, and college English teacher. He received an MFA in Creative Writing and an MA in English from Northern Arizona University. He currently resides in Flagstaff, AZ and Tucson, AZ.

#ArtLitPhx: Desert Nights, Rising Stars Writers Conference

The Desert Nights, Rising Stars Writers Conference is three days of craft talks, panels, workshops and presentations at Arizona State University. With more than 50 sessions from over 25 faculty members in multiple genres and fields, the goal is to provide writers with opportunities to make personal and professional connections, advance their craft, and deepen their engagement with the literary field. View the full conference schedule here.

About the conference from the host, The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing:

“We are committed to creating an accessible and inclusive space for writers of all backgrounds, genres, and skill levels. Conference faculty and programming encompass many genres which can often go under served in the literary field, including Young Adult, Science-Fiction/Fantasy, Crime Fiction, Translation, Graphic Novels, Hybrid, and more.

Special topics like climate change, social justice, and other contemporary issues also feature prominently.

Publishing, editing, agents, and other aspects of the business of publishing are included as well.

Beyond sessions, attendees can also participate in receptions, discussion groups, after-hour socials, and other opportunities to connect with fellow conference-goers, develop relationships, and build community.”

The 2018 Desert Nights, Rising Stars Writers Conference will take place from Thursday, February 22 through Saturday, February 24. Writers of all backgrounds and experience levels are encouraged to attend. Register here.

#ArtLitPhx: Sparky Slam Poetry Competition

ASU is hosting their inaugural Sparky Slam poetry event emceed by the spoken word poet Tomas Stanton of Phonetic Spit. Sparky Slam is a valley wide poetry contest for students in grades 5 through 12, with a writing workshop that is taking place immediately before the competition. The purpose of the Sparky Slam is to welcome young people onto a college campus, to celebrate youth voices, and to provide young artists with writing support from ASU faculty and students.

Poets will perform an original poem, a maximum of 3 ½ minutes in length and there will be at least 20 performers.

Sparky Slam will be held at ASU’s West campus Herberger Young Scholars Academy Black Box Theatre on Saturday, February 3rd. Poets check-in is at 4:45 p.m. and the Slam begins at 6 p.m. Arrive early as seating will be limited.

For more information or registration click here

#ArtLitPhx: ASU MFA Reading Series feat. Steve Abell, Kalani Pickhart, and Jack Geist

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program at Arizona State University is hosting a special 8-part reading series featuring brand new work from ASU graduate students! Each reading will host 3-4 students at The Watershed, a beautiful waterfront restaurant and bar.

Watershed LakeviewThe next installment of the series will take place on November 7 from 7:30pm to 8:30pm, though you can come earlier to mingle, drink, and eat. You can find The Watershed at 5350 S Lakeshore Dr, Tempe, Arizona 85283.

The featured readers for the November 7 event are:

  • Steve Abell, Poetry
  • Kalani Pickhart, Fiction
  • Jack Geist, Poetry

(Update: Natasha Murdock has replaced Jack Geist as the third reader!)

We’re so excited for this installment of the series, especially because Kalani Pickhart was a contributor in Issue 19 of Superstition Review! You can read her piece, “Little Mouse,” here.

Stay tuned for later installments of this reading series! You can find more information on the event’s Facebook page and on the Facebook page for the ASU MFA Program in Creative Writing.

Authors Talk: Kalani Pickhart

Today we are pleased to to feature author Kalani Pickhart as our Authors Talk series contributor. Kalani discusses the process and personal significance of “Little Mouse.” She concludes by offering a piece of advice for other young writers.

Kalani explains that “Little Mouse” is her first story that “did a lot with very, very little.” She explains her immediate affinity for this method because it allows the characters’ voices to be communicated more directly. Characters revealing themselves and being heard on their own terms and in their own tone is Kalani’s first priority. This is clear from her language throughout the talk.

You can read and listen to “Little Mouse” in Superstition Review, Issue 19.

Guest Post, Maureen Alsop: Anemomancy

AnemomancyAnemomancy

              divination by predicting weather change or reading the future strength and

direction of the wind

 

Along the road’s pitch, a token of yellow moths—the auburn
river’s warning tool— electricity
                          between wing and crescent, where
reeds open the mailbox’ flag. As for the matter
of your father’s death.  I observe a signet ring lower
into the dim.  I signal in conscious dream
that day’s influence where I crossed into a calm
             holding his hand— what bereavement became—a percussion
of bullets bore his chest
in the faithful matter of betrayal.  No more ledgers.

But a bowl’s moss and mixed grain, a morning
without generation, a narcoleptic close of eye like envelopes.

Once I stopped talking.  Once I was love’s weak redundancy.
Did I not say no?       I did not say yes.
My hair undoes the lake’s ether.