Contributor Update: BJ Hollars

Hello, readers! We are happy to announce that B.J. Hollars, a contributor featured in the Fiction Section of our 6th issue, has written a new book available here, titled Flock Together. A chapter preview is available here and provides a sobering glance at the ivory-billed woodpecker, now gone due to deforestation. The book follows a journey to investigate many of America’s now extinct bird population. Flock Together cover art

From Hollars’ website:

After stumbling upon a book of photographs depicting extinct animals, B.J. Hollars became fascinated by the creatures that are no longer with us; specifically, extinct North American birds. How, he wondered, could we preserve so beautifully on film what we’ve failed to preserve in life? And so begins his yearlong journey to find out, one that leads him from bogs to art museums, from archives to Christmas Counts, until he at last comes as close to extinct birds as he ever will during a behind-the-scenes visit at the Chicago Field Museum. Heartbroken by the birds we’ve lost, Hollars takes refuge in those that remain. Armed with binoculars, a field guide, and knowledgeable friends, he begins his transition from budding birder to environmentally conscious citizen, a first step on a longer journey toward understanding the true tragedy of a bird’s song silenced forever.

Told with charm and wit, Flock Together is a remarkable memoir that shows how “knowing” the natural world—even just a small part—illuminates what it means to be a global citizen and how only by embracing our ecological responsibilities do we ever become fully human. A moving elegy to birds we’ve lost, Hollars’s exploration of what we can learn from extinct species will resonate in the minds of readers long beyond the final page.

Contributor Update: Patrick Madden Is A Machine (With A Heart Of Gold)

Top of the afternoon, dearest readers! We here at Superstition Review  are rife with news from the Occident after a barn-burner of a conference at this year’s AWP, held in the belly of the beast in Washington, D.C. Past contributor Patrick Madden is co-editing the 21st Century Essays series with none other than David Lazar! 21st Century Essays is put out through Ohio State University Press, and they themselves have some great news: The 2017 Gournay Prize is taking submissions from now until March 15. If anyone out there has a book-length collection of essays, or knows someone who might, tell them to check out this link here. There’s a publication deal with a cash prize of $1,000 in it for ’em if they win!

"Oh yeah. We happy."

“What we imagine it might be like to win a book deal and get $1,000.”

And the proliferation doesn’t stop there: Madden also has provided us with the announcement for not one but TWO collections of essays, titled (respectively) “After Montaigne” (which was also co-edited with David Lazar), out from University of Georgia Press, and “Sublime Physick” (for which Patrick Madden is the sole progenitor), put out through University of Nebraska Press.

Buy these books!

Covers for both “After Montaigne” and “Sublime Physick.”

Suffice it to say, Patrick Madden keeps the hits comin’, and we here at Superstition Review are only too happy to share these with you, dear readers. Congratulations to Patrick Madden, and David Lazar, for all their hard work!

That about does it for us today, gang. Thanks for reading, and always, let us know what you think in the comments section below.

#ArtLitPhx: Aaron Gilbreath: Everything We Don’t Know

everything we don't know Aaron Gilbreath

Aaron Gilbreath will be reading at Changing Hands Bookstore at the Phoenix location 300 W Camelback Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85013 on Thursday, February 9th, 2017 at 7 p.m. He will be sharing his latest collection of essays Everything We Don’t Know which examines the false starts and free falls that often accompany growing up in contemporary America. Gilbreath is an essayist and journalist for New York Times, Harper’s, and Vice, as well as others. This event is free and open to the public. For more event information visit Changing Hands Bookstore’s website.

With keen journalistic instincts and his signature unrelenting curiosity, Gilbreath takes on topics both personal and prescient, such as mental illness, the environmental impact of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster, his nostalgia for the demolished “Googie” architecture of his youth, drug use and addiction, interning at age 30, falling in love and breaking up, and more. Deftly crafted and surprisingly wise, Everything We Don’t Know is just the beginning of Gilbreath’s bold and bright career. Gilbreath is an essayist, journalist, and burrito enthusiast. His essays and articles have appeared in Harper’s, New York Times, Paris Review, Vice, The Morning News, Saveur, Tin House, The Believer, Oxford American, Kenyon Review, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, Narratively, and Brick. His essay “\’ra-di-k?l\” from Hotel Amerika is a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2013, and “Dreams of the Atomic Era” from the Cincinnati Review is a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2011.

Event: AZ Humanities


Kick off your summer with stories of travel inspiration June 7th in downtown Phoenix

Phoenix, AZ – The public is invited to join Arizona Humanities for a talk with local author Robert Isenberg. Isenberg will kick off your summer travels with stories and inspiration from his works, including his newest book, The Green Season about his life as a journalist in Costa Rica. The Authors Night takes place at the historic Ellis-Shackelford House in downtown Phoenix (1242 N. Central Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85004) on Tuesday, June 7th from 6:00-8:00pm. The program is free and light refreshments are included.

Isenberg describes his many years as a travel writer and journalist, scouring the globe for provocative stories. Hear about his rustic New England origins, life as a freelancer, and the evolving nature of long-form nonfiction. Considering a trip to Costa Rica? Ask him anything. This author night promises lively discussion about adventure in the age of the smartphone.

Seating is limited and guests are encouraged to RSVP at or call 602-257-0335.

Grean Season CoverAbout The Green Season: “A dynamic collection of essays and reportage, The Green Season illustrates daily life in Costa Rica, a tiny Central American nation dedicated to peace and teeming with tropical life. With his trademark humor and observation, Robert Isenberg describes the people, culture, and biodiversity that make Costa Rica so unique—from a centuries-old indigenous ceremony to a remote jungle crisscrossed by crocodile-filled canals. Isenberg explores the country head-on, fighting his way through San José traffic, mingling with venomous snakes, and even making a cameo in an epic soccer film at the height of World Cup fever. Richly detailed and tenderly written, The Green Season is one expat’s love letter to his adoptive homeland.”

Robert IsenbergAbout Robert Isenberg is a freelance writer, filmmaker, and stage performer. Most recently, he is the author of The Green Season, about his life as a journalist in Costa Rica. His work includes five books, 17 produced plays, dozens of short documentaries, and hundreds of articles for various magazines and newspapers. He created two one-man shows, The Archipelago (about his travels in postwar Bosnia) and One Million Elephants (about the Secret War in Laos). Isenberg is a past Whitford Fellow, Brackenridge Fellow, and recipient of two Golden Quill Awards, as well as a Pushcart Prize nominee. Visit him at

SR Pod/Vod Series: Writer Sheila Squillante

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Sheila Squillante.


Sheila Squillante is the author of four chapbooks of poetry and a full-length collection due out with Tiny Hardcore Press in 2014. Besides Superstition Review, her essays have appeared in places like Brevity, The Rumpus, Waccamaw, Sweet: A Literary ConfectionThe Inquisitive Eater, and Barrelhouse. This summer she joins the faculty of Chatham University in Pittsburgh as the associate director of their low-res MFA program in creative writing. You can find out more at her website,

You can read along with her work in Issue 10 of Superstition Review.

To subscribe to our iTunes U channel, go to

Subtropics: literary fiction, essays, and poetry

Subtropics is published three times a year by the Department of English at the University of Florida. The editor is David Leavitt, managing editor is Mark Mitchell, 
and poetry editor is Sidney Wade.

Fiction and poetry from Subtropics have been anthologized in the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories; Best American Poetry; Best American Short Stories; New Stories from the South; and New Stories from the Midwest. In addition, some of our authors have received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Subtropics seeks to publish the best literary fiction, essays, and poetry being written today, both by established and emerging authors. Visit their website at: