SR Pod/Vod Series: Poet Jim Daniels

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Jim Daniels.

Jim DanielsJim Daniels is the winner of the Blue Lynx Poetry Prize for his book, Revolt of the Crash-Test Dummies (Eastern Washington University Press, 2007). In addition, he has edited or co-edited four anthologies, including Letters to America: Contemporary American Poetry on Race, and American Poetry: The Next Generation. He has received the Brittingham Prize for Poetry, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. His poems have appeared in the Pushcart Prize and Best American Poetry anthologies. He is the Thomas Stockman Baker Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University, where he directs the Creative Writing Program.

You can listen to the podcast on our iTunes Channel.
You can read along with the work in Superstition Review.

 

SR Pod/Vod Series: Poet Pete Miller

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Pete Miller.

petemillerPete Miller lives in Omaha, Nebraska, where he works doing homeless outreach. A graduate of Arizona State University’s MFA program, his poems have appeared in The Minus Times, H_ngm_n, and Hayden’s Ferry Review.

You can read along with his poems in issue 1 of Superstition Review.

To subscribe to our iTunes U channel, go to http://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/superstition-review-online/id552593273

 

Past Intern Updates: Sarah Snyder

Sarah Snyder, from Issues 1 and 2, has traveled to the Far East and back–and discovered a true passion for teaching English as a foreign language. She shares with us her experience:

Grandma always said, “Everything in moderation—even moderation.” As a junior at ASU, taking 18 credits a semester, being the Reading Series Coordinator for Superstition Review, working at the Polytechnic campus Writing Center, serving as the President of ASU’s Devil Dancesport ballroom dancing team, and volunteering as a Peer Advisor for the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, I was no stranger to overextending myself, to going deeper than I could swim back up in time for air.  When I graduated in 2009, I made a strategic career move and took a job in Japan teaching English in two high schools. It was only strategic because I couldn’t even get anything close to a job in the United States. Luckily for me, this job helped me realize what I really wanted to do with my life: create positive cultural exchange and communication. This lesson came to me through all of the artists that I coordinated through SR, the students that I worked with in the Writing Center, as the President of a student organization, as a Peer Advisor and in Japan.

After a year in the Land of the Rising Sun, I moved back home to the Valley of the Sun. My parents were happy to have me home in the flesh instead of pixelated and robotic on Skype. They were perfectly content to keep me there, but I was soon restless. I needed something to keep me happy, healthy and productive, but I experienced the same depression that my father remembered as an adolescent. He told me his story from the 1970s when he was expressing the same feeling of helplessness to his grandfather. To that, Great-Grandpa Krebbs said, “There is always work for those who want it.” To this day, my father doesn’t know whether or not that was a challenge or a jab, but I took it as a challenge. I pulsed all of my networks for careers in academia for months. I applied to everything. I also kept myself busy taking Spanish and Japanese at the local community colleges to keep my morale up. Around month six, I was called for my first interview. It was my chance to vie for my dream job of being an academic advisor! At the age of 24 (my lucky Japanese year of the Rabbit) I was hired as the youngest member of an academic advising team with my mentors from undergrad as my supervisors.

After some serious soul-searching, I had to sacrifice my dream job in favor of the English and TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) programs at Northern Arizona University, where I am happily immersed in concurrent graduate programs and teaching freshman composition for native and non-native speakers of English. I hope to pursue a Ph.D. in Rhetoric, Composition and Linguistics in the near future. This, I believe, will help me bring positive cultural exchange and communication to more people than I could have ever hoped while being one teacher working with just 30 students at a time in a sea of millions. It will be more work that I have probably ever had in my life—but I also have itty-bitty daydreams of being the President of the United States as well, so bring it on.

As I look back now, all I can say is that Grandma was right. “Everything in moderation–even moderation.” If I could go back in time with all of this 20/20 retrospect, I wouldn’t change one thing. Now, I am making sure that I give just as much as I have received, and these last sentences are little karmic presents for anyone who wants them: In order to survive in the world that we live in today, concentration and positive thinking are the keys to getting what the universe thinks you deserve. Nobody gets anywhere anymore by stepping on people. We’re in the age of Google, people! Also, it really DOES matter who you know and how you treat the people around you…No one ever knows who they will be interacting with in the future. Network, network, NETWORK! Oh, and always brush your teeth (another Grandma quote).

#ArchiveDive: A Glimpse Into the Past

Each week we feature one of our interns at Superstition Review. This week’s piece comes from Advertising Coordinator Daniel Redding

A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
I say it just begins
to live that day.
– Emily Dickinson


A piece of writing can be judged as truly great when the reader can go back to it again and again, while still having a unique reaction to it. A work will not fade if it can stay alive long after its initial presentation. As a writer, I often judge my pieces by how I respond to them months and years down the road. As a young adult, my favorite novels would become worn at the seams, ultimately falling apart, highlighting the impact they had on my development. It was then, early on, that I began to realize the long-term effect of literature, and in turn the power of the writer, and for me there was no looking back.

As a part of our Twitter presence, Superstition Review has been conducting an #ArchiveDive campaign, going back through our past eight issues to find pieces that strike us today as much as they did then. Every piece published in SR is powerful in its own way. However, these recent selections for #ArchiveDive highlight the breadth of SR’s publishing history.

Among the recent highlights have been Christy Puetz’s three-dimensional beaded art from Issue 7, as well as John J. Clayton’s “Darkness Visible,” a short story from the same issue. Also rediscovered were Hilary Masters’ essay, “Working the Vineyard,” from Issue 2, and Nathaniel Miles Millard’s poetry of Issue 1.

We hope you will join us in diving back into our archives to enjoy the wide range of work we have been privileged to publish over the last four years.

2012 National Book Critics Circle Board of Directors Has Been Announced

Critical Mass, the blog for the National Book Critics Circle Board of Directors, has just announced the 2012 Board Election Results. From 28 candidates, eight board members were elected to serve a three year term at the NBCC.

SR is proud to congratulate Issue 1 contributor Rigoberto González, who has been elected to the board. Rigoberto is an award-winning author known for his reviews at the El Paso Times and LA Review of Books.

The other seven members include Steven G. Kellman (author of Redemption: The Life of Henry Roth), Karen R. Long (book editor at The Plain Dealer), Michael Miller (editor at Bookforum), Laurie Muchnick (editor at Bloomberg News), Megan O’Grady (Contributing Editor at Vogue), John Reed (author of Snowball’s Chance), and Parul Sehgal (Books Editor of NPR.org).

Congratulations to the new 2012 NBCC board.

Guest Article: Spotlight on Kelly Vo, by Asonta Benetti

kellyvo_0

Kelly Vo.

Superstition Review student intern Asonta Benetti interviewed past intern Kelly Vo to see how she was impacted by her experiences with SR:

“It really was not a planned internship,” Kelly Vo remembers, “but I know that without the amazing experiences I had at Superstition Review, I wouldn’t be as prepared for the next steps of my life.” Vo started with SR in Spring 2008, helping kick off the premier issue by holding down the Fiction Editor position with another colleague. “I didn’t know how much work and time went into getting an online magazine off the ground and running,” she recollects. “Creating a new magazine is a huge project and I know that it would not have turned into such a wonderful magazine if it wasn’t for the fact that we all collaborated and worked together to make a great product.”

Vo is currently an intern at E.B. Lane Publishing, working in the advertising Account Management sector. She plans to graduate this coming December and has applied to join Teach for America. “I very much enjoyed being an intern for Superstition Review. It was an amazing experience. I had never worked on a magazine before and I never really thought it would be something that I would enjoy but it ended up being a blast.”

Author Spotlight: Denise Duhamel

Denise DuhamelThis week’s Author Spotlight is on renowned poet Denise Duhamel, whose books include Kinky, Queen for a Day, and The Woman With Two Vaginas. She has also published work in numerous literary magazines and has collaborated with Maureen Seaton on three books of poetry.

Duhamel received the Crab Orchard Poetry Prize for her book The Star-Spangled Banner, and is one of poetry’s premier voices. Her writing is unique, thought provoking, and edgy. She helps her readers have a new mindset when looking at the world, and uses seemingly innocuous subjects like Barbie to make her readers re-examine society. Click here to read her poem One Afternoon When Barbie Wanted to Join the Military.

Queen for a DayDuhamel currently enriches the lives of students at Florida International University, where she teaches Creative Writing. She is married to the poet Nick Carbó.

To read more about Denise Duhamel click here. To read more of her poetry, please click here, or purchase one of her wonderful books.

And don’t forget to check out her interview in the upcoming issue of Superstition Review!