Authors Talk: Timothy Reilly

Today we are pleased to feature author Timothy Reilly as our Authors Talk series contributor. In this podcast, Timothy discusses the inspiration behind his short story, “The Task at Hand,” calling it a “nod to the old Grail romances.”

Timothy states that “‘The Task at Hand’ is not a ‘Baby Boomer’ story,” even though it concerns a protagonist from that generation. Instead, he says,  it is “an internal quest… framed within a common 21st-century excursion.” During that quest the protagonist “deals with the challenges of age and memory,” as well as “the fickleness of pop culture.”

Timothy, hearkening back to his lifelong interest in Grail legends, declares that “myths are about truth, not facts.” He ends by referencing a quote from C.S Lewis, saying that when he realized this fact and “was old enough to read fairy tales again,” he began to write short stories of his own.

You can read Timothy’s story, “The Task at Hand,” in Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

 

 

 

Contributor Update, Sue William Silverman: New Poetry Collection “If the Girl Never Learns”

If the Girl Never Learns coverToday we are proud to announce news about past contributor Sue William Silverman. Sue’s new poetry collection, If the Girl Never Learns, will be out in April, 2019 from Brick Mantel Books. Congratulations, Sue!

Death Comes for the Poet” by Sue William Silverman can be read in Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

 

Contributor Update, Laurie Filipelli: New Poetry Collection

We are happy to announce that past contributor Laurie Filipelli from Issue 16 has released her new poetry collection “Girl Paper Stone.” Laurie’s new poetry collection is now available for purchase. Congratulations Laurie!

Contributor Update
Contributor Update

Praise for GIRL PAPER STONE

In her luminous book, Laurie Filipelli remakes the constellations of a modern life. Her poems re-draw the lines between the parts of the world, helping us to see there are no divisions between planting a plumbago and watching the passage of hateful legislation, no space between grief for a lost father and the wonder of what he’s told the speaker: “the whale’s veins are so wide we could swim/ to her heart.” By looking so tenderly and incisively at the actual experience of a life, Filipelli makes us see our own differently.
—Sasha West

Flying together, flying apart: in these poems the self is as elastic as a flock of birds cutting across the winter sky. Here, among carousel and cave, where “the bigger you spin, the lighter you fall,” we are invited into the world of mothers and daughters, fathers and grandfathers, a geography whose inhabitants bear steadily forward while always casting a long look back. As our leader advances, in an outstretched hand she presents to us the artifacts of her explorations—mirrors, keys, paper dragons—reminding us all the while to accept the dangers of discovery as well as its myriad blessings. The wisdom within these pages is hard-won and generously offered, the speaker lifting her face skyward no matter the conditions at her feet. “The future is a ballad sung in your name,” Filipelli promises, and we want to—we do—believe her.
—Laurie Saurborn

With Laurie Filipelli’s Girl Paper Stone we revel in a collection of lyric recuperations that simultaneously soothe and trouble, delight and disrupt as they marvel and lament at the fragility, wonder, and hurt of our daily lives, our dream lives, and the underground life of our divinations. These poems reject the immovable and fixed and find meaning in the always transforming torrent that is our doing and un-doing. What a great pleasure to find these poems—all at once in flight, grounded, on fire, and full of heart—elemental, beautiful, and indispensable.
—Cathy Bowman
Please visit Laurie’s website at lauriefilipelli.org

Contributor Update: Elaine Ford

Elaine Ford Today, we here at Superstition Review want to take time to mourn the loss of past contributor Elaine Ford, who passed away in August 2017 at the age of 78. We will forever be grateful for Elaine’s contribution to our magazine and are honored to announce the release of her seventh book, This Time Might Be Different, which will be out from Islandport Press on March 13, 2018. The books is available for preorder from both Amazon and Islandport PressThis Time Might Be Different Book Cover

Foreclosure” by Elaine Ford can be read in Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

Contributor Update: Adrianne Kalfopoulou

Cover for A History of Too Much by Adrianne Kalfopoulou Today we are excited to announce that past contributor Adrianne Kalfopoulou has a forthcoming poetry collection titled A History of Too Much. The book is already available for pre-order from Amazon, but is set to release on April 23, 2018. A History of Too Much addresses an Athens undergoing the first ravages of political and financial crisis in the time of the Greek Euro crisis.

You can read Adrianne’s essay “The Journey Where” in Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

Congratulations, Adrianne!

Contributor Update: Adrianne Kalfopoulou

Today "Poem in Pieces"we are excited to announce that past contributor Adrianne Kalfopoulou has been recently featured in Duende, the national literary journal of Goddard College’s BFA program. Read Adrianne’s poem, “Poem in Pieces” on their website here.

To read Adrianne’s essay “The Journey Where” in Issue 16 of Superstition Review click here.

 

Contributor Update: Hannah Lee Jones

Hannah Lee JonesToday we are pleased to announce that past contributor Hannah Lee Jones has been recently featured in Ruminate Magazine. Hannah’s poems “When My Mouth First Opened” and “October” can be read in Ruminate’s Issue No. 44. Purchase a copy by clicking here.

To read three poems by Hannah Lee Jones in Issue 16 of Superstition Review click here.