Contributor Update: Emily Matyas and SEE magazine

SEE Magazine recently began their series, “The Importance of Being Churro: The Sheep at the Heart of Navajo Culture.” The magazine was co-founded by previous contributor Emily Matyas, who provides photographs for the article. In part one, Colleen Oakes provides a broad introduction to the contemporary struggles facing Navajo traditions that starts with raising Churro sheep. The article is accompanied by powerful interviews and stunning photography. Emily Matyas Headshot

You can check out Emily’s work for Superstition Review in Issue 14 here.

#ArtLitPhx: Rinky Dink Press Series 3 Launch

Rinky Dink Press logoOn Friday June 16th, Rinky Dink Press will be hosting a launch party for it’s newest series of micro-chapbooks. The event will take place at Wasted Ink Zine Distro from 7PM to 9PM. Stop in for refreshments and pop-up readings from ten brand new microzines and micro-chapbooks. All books will be on sale for $1 each, and performing poets include Virginia Chase Sutton and Randy Heflin. Other published poets include Justin Rogers, Jasmine Chatfield, Woody Woodger, Dane Hamann, Jessica Van de Kemp, Caroline Kessler, Alex Skorochid, and Nick Hopkins.

You can find the Facebook event here. Wasted Ink Zine Distro is located at 2222 N. 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85006.

Splash of Red

Splash of Red is an international online literary arts magazine that publishes poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art, interviews, and graphic narratives. They have published interviews with many Pulitzer Prize winners, US Poet Laureates, and acclaimed writers as well as some of the top editors and publishers in the country for their Industry Interview Series. What sets these interviews apart from others is that they focus on the readers of the literary magazine, many of whom are writers themselves. The interviews delve into writing processes of the interviewess, editing techniques, and strategies for getting around writer’s block. And the Industry Series investigates the other side of the table that writers rarely get a glimpse into in order to better their odds at getting their work published. But the meat of the publication is the fantastic submissions that come from all over the world.

The name of the publication comes from three inspirations: 1) the infamous red ink in draft after draft to get the best quality writing, 2) the blood and passion that goes into only the most skillfully crafted art, and 3) great work stands out just like a splash of red.
In 2010, Splash of Red organized numerous live events where authors came to speak with audiences for live Q and As. Some of the authors included Pulitzer Prize winning author Junot Diaz, famed writer Eleanor Herman, and Daniel Wallace – author of Big Fish, who spoke with eager audience members following a showing of the film based on his novel at a local independent theater. Additionally, the online magazine involved local communities by spearheading a special public mural on the New Jersey boardwalk in Asbury Park. Three artists chose three poems published on the website and created pieces of art inspired by and including those poems which were then painted in multiple, large murals across the backdrop of the mid-Atlantic.

Interested fans can follow Splash of Red on Twitter, Facebook, or become a member and get email updates about newly published work and events. One of the things they pride themselves on is creating an online literary arts community where readers can post comments on anything published on the website, submit art inspired by splashes of red for their Red Gallery, and involving members in creative decisions and directions for the publication including suggestions for interviewees.

If you take any one thing away from this blog post, take this: check it out. The website is www.SplashOfRed.net and feel free to peruse, read, comment, and investigate at your own leisure. Make it your own and enjoy!

The Deadlines Have Just Begun

kevinrosseel_031408_060.jpgEven though the deadline for the potential authors of Superstition Review has already passed, the deadlines are only just beginning for us here at the magazine.

After receiving hundreds of submissions, we need to have all of the final selections for our Inaugural issue decided by March 24th at the latest. The prospect is overwhelming to say the least, especially with all of the amazingly creative and high-quality work that we have received.

We here at Superstition Review can’t thank everyone who submitted their work enough; sending in your work to a publication takes a lot of courage, and we know that for many of you, your writing is a small part of yourself. But we can’t reinforce enough that even if your piece is not published in Superstition Review, we are honored that you shared it with us.

So here’s to a wonderful start of a busy week, and to a wonderful cast of authors, editors, and a wellspring of incredible writing for all!

End of Submission Period!

Yesterday, March 15th, was the last day that submissions for Superstition Review were accepted. If you missed the deadline, remember that we will also publish an issue in Fall, 2008.

Stay tuned to the News Blog to find out the latest on submission deadlines and other events for Superstition Review.

Who is Superstition Review?

If you’ve stumbled on this blog after searching on Google or WordPress, welcome! This blog is actually just a very small part of Superstition Review, the online literary magazine for Arizona State University’s Polytechnic Campus.

While this blog gives frequent updates of our progress here at the magazine, please check out our website to learn more about us.  If you’re an author who is interested in submitting work, please visit our Submissions page by clicking here.

 

Superstition Review Joins ‘ASU in the Community’ Website!

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It’s an exciting day for the staff here at the magazine because Superstition Review has just been accepted as a part of the ASU in the Community database. According to their homepage, the site “demonstrates ASU’s commitment to the region as a New American University, while also serving as a tool for identifying specific programs and linking to a network of people engaged in the community.”

Superstition Review is a perfect example of what the ASU in the Community site is trying to do because Superstition Review is not only a collaboration between students and staff from different degree programs at ASU, but also hosts readings that are open to the public free of charge.

To find out more about what Superstition Review is doing in the community, check out our page on the ASU in the Community website, or, visit our homepage.