Literary Partners: North American Review

Featured Partner: North American Reviewnorth american review

Submissions are open for the North American Review‘s third annual Torch Memorial Prize for Creative Nonfiction. First Prize: $500. You may submit only one piece of creative nonfiction, no longer than 30 pages in a Word document. All contact information should be entered in your cover letter. No names or addresses should appear on manuscripts, please. All submissions will be read blind. Deadline: April 1, 2017

Judge: Dinty W. Moore. More information can be found at northamericanreview.org.

Newsletter 2/24

“Superstition

2.24.17


Forrest Gander Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

forrest ganderPoet, translator and essayist Forrest Gander will be reading from his work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday March 3 at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The event is organized by the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Superstition Review and the Arizona State University College of Integrative Sciences and Arts are proud co-sponsors.

Gander is the author of the 2011 poetry collection, Core Samples from the World, which was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books include two novels, As A Friend and Trace; the poetry collections Eye Against Eye, Torn Awake, Science & Steepleflower; and the essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence. Gander’s essays have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, The New York Times Book Review and other publications. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry.


Submissions Open Until Feb. 28 

Superstition Review LogoThe deadline for submission for Superstition Review issue 19, publishing May 1st, is Feb. 28th. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work.

 

 

 

 


8 New Books The New York Times Recommends This Week 

NYT Books

Whether you want to escape the present through a novel, or better understand the present through an enlightening piece of non-fiction, the New York Times has you covered.

There’s a novel by Margaret Drabble, a collection of short stories by Viet Thanh Nguyen, and two great non-fiction picks from Richard Haass and Pankaj Mishra.

Read the full list here.

 


16 Books Coming to the Big Screen in 2017

Books Coming to the Big Screen

Books and movies seem to have always had a strange relationship; isn’t one always better than the other? But there are a number of exciting book adaptations coming to the big screen in 2017.

From Julian Barnes’ Man Booker winning The Sense of an Ending, to the long awaited adaptation of Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, to Dave Egger’s The Circle, to even a new take on Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, there’s a lot to look forward to.

See the full list by Barnes and Noble here.

 

 


Featured Partner: Witness

Witness CoverThe new issue of Witness is about chaos, which very old references describe as a void, an absence, a state before creation. But more recent scientific use implies that randomness and disorder would make sense if we could just get a vast enough perspective.

We’ve strived toward that goal with new fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, in print and online at WitnessMag.org.

From life-changing events that take place in the womb to unexpected shifts at the end of a life, these pieces contemplate the control we work to exert or the lack of control that we endure within individual lives.

Witness Magazine

witness@unlv.edu

witnessmag.org

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Featured Partner: North American Reviewnorth american review

Submissions are open for the North American Review‘s third annual Torch Memorial Prize for Creative Nonfiction. First Prize: $500. You may submit only one piece of creative nonfiction, no longer than 30 pages in a Word document. All contact information should be entered in your cover letter. No names or addresses should appear on manuscripts, please. All submissions will be read blind. Deadline: April 1, 2017

Judge: Dinty W. Moore. More information can be found at northamericanreview.org.

 

Featured Partner: Berkeley Fiction Review

Berkeley Fiction ReviewThe Berkeley Fiction Review is one of several descendants of UC Berkeley’s Occident literary journal, which was published from 1881 to the 1960s. Established in 1981, it is now UC Berkeley’s oldest prose journal. We strive to publish short fiction that challenges the concept of the short story through unique prose, curious concepts, and engrossing narratives. We’d love for you to be a part of our literary tradition. Send your creative works to berkeleyfictionreview@gmail.com!


“When you read a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you.” – George Saunders

 

 

North American Review

North American ReviewThe North American Review is now seeking submissions to the 17th Annual James Hearst Poetry Prize. This year’s judge is Major Jackson. The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2016. First prize is $1,000, and all winners and finalists will be published in the Spring 2017 issue. The entry fee is $20.00 and includes a one-year subscription to the North American Review.
This year, all submissions to the James Hearst Poetry Prize will be handled through our online submission system.
Visit our submission guidelines for more information.

 

Newsletter 9/23

“Superstition

9.23.16


Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Robert Hass and Brenda Hillman

Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass, two of contemporary poetry’s most acclaimed voices, will be reading from their work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday Oct. 7 at 7:00 p.m.

Brenda Hillman is the author of nine books of poetry, including Practical Water, for which she received the LA Times Book Award for Poetry, and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, for which she won the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize and the Northern California Book Award for Poetry. Robert Hass, who served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997, is the author of six books of poetry, including Time and Materials: Poems 1997-2005, for which he won the 2007 National Book Award and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize. Leah Marché, a local performance poet and spoken word artist, will be opening for the event.

The reading is supported by the Angela and Leonard Singer Endowment for Performing Arts, and presented by the ASU Performance in the Borderlands Initiative and the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


7 Books to Read During Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month started Sep. 15, and runs until Oct. 15. This month is an important time to recognize the influence and contributions of Hispanic people and culture, and celebrate the role diversity plays in the human experience. Hispanic writing has exerted a tremendous influence on literature, and Hispanic Heritage Month is a great time to catch up on some reading.

With so many great works from Hispanic authors to choose from, it’s hard to narrow it down to just seven, but Latina magazine’s list is a great selection, including authors as diverse as Miguel de Cervantes and Isabel Allende.

Click here to see other essential books to be reading this month.


Autumn is the Best Season for Reading

Fall Reading

With fall finally upon us, Barnes and Noble makes the case that autumn really is the best season for reading. There’s just something inextricable that seems to link books and autumn. The leaves change, the pumpkin spice latte marks its emphatic return, and books take on a more mystical proportion.

With our summer beach reads still coated in sand, we look forward to curling up by the fire with a cup of tea or hot chocolate. And it’s not just the aesthetic or the beverages that make autumn reading so appealing — it’s also a time for new releases, such as Zadie Smith’s new book, Swing Time, coming out at the beginning of November.

Click here to read more about autumn reading and some other great new books on the way.


Submissions Open Until Oct. 31st

Superstition Review Logo

The deadline for submission for Superstition Review issue 18, publishing Dec. 1st, is Oct. 31st. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work.

 

 

 

 

 


Featured Partner: North American Review

North American Review

The North American Review is now seeking submissions to the 17th Annual James Hearst Poetry Prize. This year’s judge is Major Jackson. The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2016. First prize is $1,000, and all winners and finalists will be published in the Spring 2017 issue. The entry fee is $20.00 and includes a one-year subscription to the North American Review.

This year, all submissions to the James Hearst Poetry Prize will be handled through our online submission system.

Visit our submission guidelines for more information.

 

Guest Post, Kristen Arnett: “I Come From a Family” Writing and Rewriting Familial Truth in Fiction

These words open our work, even if they’re not explicitly stated. Our fiction holds characters that come from all types of homes. We conjure blended families, multi-generational households, ones that contain fostered and adopted children; we’ve got queer families, racially diverse backgrounds, and created homes with loved ones of our character’s own choosing. There’s no limit to what we might come up with. Our characters are defined by these families. Their backgrounds tell us how they overcome crisis and trauma, or how they ultimately succumb to it. Even if we’re not writing about a character’s family, it’s always there, lurking in the background like a horrible upcoming family reunion. Characters come with domestic baggage.

Here’s where things get tricky. The intimate backgrounds of these characters can often extend from our own. Sometimes this is on accident – perhaps a family legend falls into the narrative; the time your father angrily emailed KFC because he hated their new commercials – but it can also be done with malice. Conjuring stories gives us a wild kind of freedom, and how nice would it be to get that thing on paper that’s been bothering you for years?

paper-family-1313628At a recent Tin House workshop, Dorothy Allison talked about writing truth in fiction. She discussed its hardness and its necessity; told us all to “write like a hammer.” These realities struck the audience silent – we’re all attempting to create something greater than ourselves in our work, something that will stand as testament that we were here and took up space. Dorothy expounded on this concept, shouting that it didn’t matter if something honest was hard to hear, because “it’s true, therefore I have the right to scare the shit out of you with it.” Everyone nodded in agreement; after all, the scary stuff is where we find the real meat of our work. After saying this, however, her tone softened. She stared out at the audience, made eye contact with nearly everyone, and said, “but truth is not a defense against destroying people.”

I went home from Tin House and thought about this a lot. I write fiction and essays, and I admit that sometimes the line between those two gets a little smudged. So much of what I am is because of who I was; the people who raised me and what my home was like. I write about Florida, I write about my queerness, and I write about the church. I write to know who I am now, and I keep writing because I am never the same person as I was the day before. My family is part of that process because I am incapable of maintaining an identity separate from them. It would be tantamount to carving up my body and saying, well, I am mostly just this thigh meat and the neck part. It can’t be done.

Fiction isn’t truth, but it contains elements of it. How we write is informed by our environment. I look to my parents and their traditions, and sometimes I say, there’s fodder here for something that once hurt me. Writing about it helps me look at all the sides of these issues – I can look at how they informed me, but I can also better see my own role in them: how I dealt with them at the time, what I took away from those experiences. Coming back from the work shop, I look at these instances in my writing and ask: what’s the ultimate cost of disclosing them?

Dorothy closed out her work shop panel by telling us that “you are trying to put something on the page worth what it cost you to put it on the page.” For myself, I took this to mean that my writing is not a way to exorcise demons. It is a way to confront established ideas and reassess them. In my quest for honesty in my work, I am saying that I require honesty from myself before I expect it from anyone else. I am saying that in order to write, I must look at the world I inhabit and understand that I am not the god of it. I live here, but so does everyone else. What I must do in my writing is take a hard look at how I write about family and decide if it rings true; not insert harmful narrative because I want to push it away from me. That’s the most truthful way for me to write fiction.

And yes, my father did email KFC – but he won’t mind that I told you about it. Just try not to bring up the Colonel; he’s still a little touchy about it.

SR Pod/Vod Series: Poet Ephraim Sommers

Ephraim Sommers

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Ephraim Scott Sommers.

A singer and guitar player, Ephraim Scott Sommers has performed music in cafes, bars, cantinas, festivals and strip clubs on three different continents. Recent poetry has appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, Copper Nickel, Harpur Palate, The Journal, TriQuarterly, Verse Daily and elsewhere. New work is also forthcoming in American Poetry Journal, Ninth Letter, and North American Review. Ephraim is currently teaching creative writing while a PhD candidate at Western Michigan University. For music and poetry, please visit: www.reverbnation.com/ephraimscottsommers.

You can listen to the podcast on our iTunes Channel.

You can read along with the work in Superstition Review.

 

SR Pod/Vod Series: Writer Allegra Hyde

Each Tuesday we feature audio or video of an SR Contributor reading their work. Today we’re proud to feature a podcast by Allegra Hyde.

allegrahyde_0Allegra Hyde serves as prose editor for Hayden’s Ferry Review. Her short stories and essays have appeared in the North American Review, LUMINA, Southwestern American Literature, Bellevue Literary Review, Grist Journal, and elsewhere. She lives in Arizona.

You can listen to the podcast on our iTunes Channel.

You can read along with the work in Superstition Review.