Newsletter 3/24

“Superstition

3.24.17


Contest: Show Us Your Workspace

Workspace Contest

At the end of every author interview, we ask the same question: What does your writing space look like? Now, we’re asking you!

We’re accepting entries on Twitter: Tag us in a pic, use , &  you could win a Starbucks gift card! Contest ends March 31.


Ocean Vuong and Camille Rankine Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Poets Ocean Vuong and Camille Rankine will be reading from their work at Phoenix Art Museum (1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004) on April 7 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event is hosted by the University of Arizona Poetry Center, the Phoenix Art Museum, Literary & Prologue Society of the Southwest, ASU College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Superstition Review, ASU’s Virginia G. Piper Center For Creative Writing, and ASU Performance in the Border/Lands. After the reading, there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Ocean Vuong is the author of Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press, 2016). His writings have been featured in the Kenyon Review, GRANTA, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Poetry, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Born in Saigon, Vietnam, he lives in New York City.

Camille Rankine’s first book of poetry, Incorrect Merciful Impulses, was published in January by Copper Canyon Press. Her poetry has appeared in Atlas Review, American Poet, The Baffler, Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Octopus Magazine, Paper Darts, Phantom Books, A Public Space, Tin House, and elsewhere. She serves on the Executive Committee of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, and lives in New York City.


The Book Nerd’s Guide to Non-Readers

For bibliophiles, it can be frustrating to explain the love for the written word, especially when the response is sometimes, “People still read books?”

But the Book Nerd over at Barnes and Noble Reads has compiled a guide to non-readers that any book lover can get behind.

See the article by Barnes and Noble here.


Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Writing Playlist

Lin-Manuel Miranda, the mind behind Hamilton and the Moana soundtrack, shared on Twitter a 19-track playlist called “Write Your Way Out,” a collection of songs “about writing, songs that feature great writing, and everything in between.”

From Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan to Saul Williams and Nas, this playlist’s a great way to punch through that next bout of writer’s block.

See the full list here.


Featured Partner: Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle is a nonprofit journal of the literary arts, founded in 2007. We are always seeking critics to review the titles listed on our review shelf at http://prickofthespindle.org/reviewer-guidelines/. We are also seeking short film and visual artists for our online galleries, as well as satire for the new online section, The Corner. Submit your fiction, poetry, nonfiction, humorous pieces, reviews, interviews, artwork, and drama for the biannual print edition at https://posprint.submittable.com/submit. To purchase copies of the biannual print edition, visit http://prickofthespindle.org/shop/

 

Newsletter 2/24

“Superstition

2.24.17


Forrest Gander Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

forrest ganderPoet, translator and essayist Forrest Gander will be reading from his work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday March 3 at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The event is organized by the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Superstition Review and the Arizona State University College of Integrative Sciences and Arts are proud co-sponsors.

Gander is the author of the 2011 poetry collection, Core Samples from the World, which was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books include two novels, As A Friend and Trace; the poetry collections Eye Against Eye, Torn Awake, Science & Steepleflower; and the essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence. Gander’s essays have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, The New York Times Book Review and other publications. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry.


Submissions Open Until Feb. 28 

Superstition Review LogoThe deadline for submission for Superstition Review issue 19, publishing May 1st, is Feb. 28th. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work.

 

 

 

 


8 New Books The New York Times Recommends This Week 

NYT Books

Whether you want to escape the present through a novel, or better understand the present through an enlightening piece of non-fiction, the New York Times has you covered.

There’s a novel by Margaret Drabble, a collection of short stories by Viet Thanh Nguyen, and two great non-fiction picks from Richard Haass and Pankaj Mishra.

Read the full list here.

 


16 Books Coming to the Big Screen in 2017

Books Coming to the Big Screen

Books and movies seem to have always had a strange relationship; isn’t one always better than the other? But there are a number of exciting book adaptations coming to the big screen in 2017.

From Julian Barnes’ Man Booker winning The Sense of an Ending, to the long awaited adaptation of Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, to Dave Egger’s The Circle, to even a new take on Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, there’s a lot to look forward to.

See the full list by Barnes and Noble here.

 

 


Featured Partner: Witness

Witness CoverThe new issue of Witness is about chaos, which very old references describe as a void, an absence, a state before creation. But more recent scientific use implies that randomness and disorder would make sense if we could just get a vast enough perspective.

We’ve strived toward that goal with new fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, in print and online at WitnessMag.org.

From life-changing events that take place in the womb to unexpected shifts at the end of a life, these pieces contemplate the control we work to exert or the lack of control that we endure within individual lives.

Witness Magazine

witness@unlv.edu

witnessmag.org

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

 

 


 

Featured Partner: North American Reviewnorth american review

Submissions are open for the North American Review‘s third annual Torch Memorial Prize for Creative Nonfiction. First Prize: $500. You may submit only one piece of creative nonfiction, no longer than 30 pages in a Word document. All contact information should be entered in your cover letter. No names or addresses should appear on manuscripts, please. All submissions will be read blind. Deadline: April 1, 2017

Judge: Dinty W. Moore. More information can be found at northamericanreview.org.

 

Featured Partner: Berkeley Fiction Review

Berkeley Fiction ReviewThe Berkeley Fiction Review is one of several descendants of UC Berkeley’s Occident literary journal, which was published from 1881 to the 1960s. Established in 1981, it is now UC Berkeley’s oldest prose journal. We strive to publish short fiction that challenges the concept of the short story through unique prose, curious concepts, and engrossing narratives. We’d love for you to be a part of our literary tradition. Send your creative works to berkeleyfictionreview@gmail.com!


“When you read a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you.” – George Saunders

 

 

#ArtLitPhx: U of A Poetry Center Presents Forrest Gander

Forrest GanderForrest Gander will read poetry at the Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004 on March 3rd from 7pm to 9pm.

Local poet Giancarlo Huapaya will open.

After the reading there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Superstition Review is proud to co-sponsor this event with The Poetry Center at The University of Arizona.

See The Poetry Center’s website for more information.

Forrest Gander is a poet, translator, essayist, and editor of several anthologies of writing from Spain and Mexico. His 2011 poetry collection Core Samples from the World was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award and his works include novels and poetry. His essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, and the New York Times Book Review, among others. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry.

#ArtLitPhx: Author + Talk with Jan Krulick-Belin

AuthorTalkJan

Arizona Humanities presents author Jan Krulick-Belin. Belin talk is based on her book, Love, Bill: Finding My Father through Letters from World War II. The event takes place on Wednesday, November 2 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Arizona Humanities. 1242 N Central Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85004. For more information please visit the Facebook event or register here. The event is free and open to the public.

Jan Krulick-Belin is a museum and art consultant, and art and jewelry historian with nearly forty years of experience at such institutions as the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Denver Art Museum, Beaumont (Texas) Art Museum, and Smithsonian Institution. Retired as Director of Education at the Phoenix Art Museum, she still works with museums, art organizations, and private collectors, and serves as guest curator at the Sylvia Plotkin Judaica Museum in Phoenix.

Newsletter 10/7

“Superstition

10.7.16


Submissions Open Until Oct. 31st

Superstition Review Logo

The deadline for submission for Superstition Review Issue 18 is Oct. 31st. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work. Issue 18 launches December 1.


13 Tips for Turning a Non-Reader Into a Reader

Reading

Many people have that one friend who doesn’t connect to books like they do, doesn’t treasure the smell of the page or the pleasure of losing an afternoon to the written word. It can be frustrating, if only they’d read that book you recommended they’d never go back to a life without bookshelves. Luckily, Barnes & Noble gives some tips for converting your less literary inclined friends into bibliophiles. Try writing a book yourself, telling your friend you wrote them into it, and have them read it to see what you wrote about them. Or reply to their text messages with only obscure literary references, and have everyone else you know do the same. Better yet, make them wait in a waiting room for hours with nothing to do and hand them a book. Read all 13 hilarious tips here.


Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Robert Hass and Brenda Hillman

Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass, two of contemporary poetry’s most acclaimed voices, will be reading from their work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday Oct. 7 at 7:00 p.m. Brenda Hillman is the author of nine books of poetry, including Practical Water, for which she received the LA Times Book Award for Poetry, and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, for which she won the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize and the Northern California Book Award for Poetry. Robert Hass, who served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997, is the author of six books of poetry, including Time and Materials: Poems 1997-2005, for which he won the 2007 National Book Award and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize. Leah Marche, a local performance poet and spoken word artist, will be opening for the event. The reading is supported by the Angela and Leonard Singer Endowment for Performing Arts, and presented by the ASU Performance in the Borderlands Initiative, Superstition Review, and the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


13 Haunting Books to Read This Fall, if You Dare

Fall isn’t just the the season for curling up by the fire with a book, it’s also the season for curling up with something scary. From noir to true crime to old fashioned ghost stories, there’s always something to keep you up, according to the Huffington PostHere are 13 haunting books to read, if you dare, ranging from true crime books like The Girls to unsettling short story collections like A Tree or a Person or a Wall. 


Featured Partner: Indiana Review

Aimee Bender

Indiana Review’s 2016 Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. Entry fee is $20 which includes a one year subscription to the magazine. Winners will receive $1,000 and publication in IR 39.1. The final judge is the wonderful Aimee Bender, author of The Girl in the Flammable Skirt and The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake. Her short fiction has also appeared in Granta, Harper’s, The Paris Review, Tin House, and more! Please send in your amazing works by the deadline, October 31st at Midnight. More information can be found at https://indianareview.org/contests/


Featured Partner: Berkeley Fiction Review

Berkeley Fiction Review

Produced on the same campus that birthed the Free Speech Movement in the wild 1960s, the Berkeley Fiction Review publishes stories that honor expression, creativity and individuality. We believe that all well-written ideas deserve a forum, from the traditional to the experimental, the niche and ubiquitous. Since 1981, BFR has published, and continues to publish, a kaleidoscopic body of work. Will you be a part of it? Visit berkeleyfictionreview.com for details on submissions, as well as our Twitter @BerkeleyFiction


Featured Partner: Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle is a nonprofit journal of the literary arts, founded in 2007. We are always seeking book reviews and critics to take on the titles listed on our review shelf. We are also seeking short film and visual artists for our online galleries, as well as humor writers for the new online section, The Corner. Submit your fiction, poetry, nonfiction, humorous pieces, reviews, interviews, artwork, and drama for the biannual print edition. Subscribe to the print edition for more than 16% off the cover price.

#ArtLitPhx: Brenda Hillman & Robert Hass at the Phoenix Art Museum

Robert-Hass-Brenda-Hillman-Oct7

The University of Arizona Poetry Center presents distinguished poets Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass at the Phoenix Art Museum. The event takes place on Friday, October 7th at 7:00 p.m. After the reading, there will be a short Q&A and a book signing. The Poetry Center is proud to partner with the Phoenix Art Museum with additional support from ASU’s Creative Writing Program, Superstition Review, Four Chambers Press, and the Literary & Prologue Society of the Southwest.

Brenda Hillman is the author of nine collections of poetry: White Dress, Fortress, Death Tractates, Bright Existence, Loose Sugar, Cascadia, Pieces of Air in the Epic, Practical Water, for which she won the LA Times Book Award for Poetry, and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, which received the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize and the Northern California Book Award for Poetry. Among the awards Hillman has received are the 2012 Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the 2005 William Carlos Williams Prize for poetry, and Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. In 2016 she was named Academy of American Poets Chancellor.

Robert Hass has published many books of poetry including Field Guide, Praise, Human Wishes, and Sun Under Wood, as well as a book of essays on poetry, Twentieth Century Pleasures. Hass translated many of the works of Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet, Czeslaw Milosz, and he edited Selected Poems: 1954-1986 by Tomas Transtromer, The Essential Haiku: Versions of Basho, Buson, and Issa; Poet’s Choice: Poems for Everyday Life; and Modernist Women Poets: An Anthology (with Paul Ebenkamp). He was the guest editor of the 2001 edition of Best American Poetry. His essay collection Now & Then, which includes his Washington Post articles, was published in April 2007. As US Poet Laureate (1995-1997), his deep commitment to environmental issues led him to found River of Words (ROW), an organization that promotes environmental and arts education in affiliation with the Library of Congress Center for the Book.

Leah Marché will be opening the reading. Leah Marché is an arts entrepreneur, performance poet and journalist/writer. In 2005, she co-founded BlackPoet Ventures, a Valley-based performance arts company that produces spoken word theatrical performances.

For more information and updates, please visit the Facebook event.

Newsletter 9/23

“Superstition

9.23.16


Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Robert Hass and Brenda Hillman

Brenda Hillman and Robert Hass, two of contemporary poetry’s most acclaimed voices, will be reading from their work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday Oct. 7 at 7:00 p.m.

Brenda Hillman is the author of nine books of poetry, including Practical Water, for which she received the LA Times Book Award for Poetry, and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, for which she won the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize and the Northern California Book Award for Poetry. Robert Hass, who served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997, is the author of six books of poetry, including Time and Materials: Poems 1997-2005, for which he won the 2007 National Book Award and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize. Leah Marché, a local performance poet and spoken word artist, will be opening for the event.

The reading is supported by the Angela and Leonard Singer Endowment for Performing Arts, and presented by the ASU Performance in the Borderlands Initiative and the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


7 Books to Read During Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month started Sep. 15, and runs until Oct. 15. This month is an important time to recognize the influence and contributions of Hispanic people and culture, and celebrate the role diversity plays in the human experience. Hispanic writing has exerted a tremendous influence on literature, and Hispanic Heritage Month is a great time to catch up on some reading.

With so many great works from Hispanic authors to choose from, it’s hard to narrow it down to just seven, but Latina magazine’s list is a great selection, including authors as diverse as Miguel de Cervantes and Isabel Allende.

Click here to see other essential books to be reading this month.


Autumn is the Best Season for Reading

Fall Reading

With fall finally upon us, Barnes and Noble makes the case that autumn really is the best season for reading. There’s just something inextricable that seems to link books and autumn. The leaves change, the pumpkin spice latte marks its emphatic return, and books take on a more mystical proportion.

With our summer beach reads still coated in sand, we look forward to curling up by the fire with a cup of tea or hot chocolate. And it’s not just the aesthetic or the beverages that make autumn reading so appealing — it’s also a time for new releases, such as Zadie Smith’s new book, Swing Time, coming out at the beginning of November.

Click here to read more about autumn reading and some other great new books on the way.


Submissions Open Until Oct. 31st

Superstition Review Logo

The deadline for submission for Superstition Review issue 18, publishing Dec. 1st, is Oct. 31st. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work.

 

 

 

 

 


Featured Partner: North American Review

North American Review

The North American Review is now seeking submissions to the 17th Annual James Hearst Poetry Prize. This year’s judge is Major Jackson. The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2016. First prize is $1,000, and all winners and finalists will be published in the Spring 2017 issue. The entry fee is $20.00 and includes a one-year subscription to the North American Review.

This year, all submissions to the James Hearst Poetry Prize will be handled through our online submission system.

Visit our submission guidelines for more information.