#ArtLitPhx: Legacies – A Conversation with Rita Dove, Sandra Cisneros, and Joy Harjo

Legacies

The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing is excited to announce “LEGACIES: A Conversation with Sandra Cisneros, Rita Dove, and Joy Harjo (Hosted by Natalie Diaz).” The event will take place Saturday, December 2 from 1:30pm to 3:00pm in the Great Hall, Beus Center for Law and Society, Rm. 141, Arizona State University, Downtown Phoenix (111 E Taylor St, Phoenix, AZ 85004).

Although the event itself is December 2, make sure to put this on your radar now! This is a ticketed event, and tickets will become available on Saturday, November 4, at 12pm with a limited waitlist. All tickets are free, and there will be no walk-ins for the event. You can see more details about ticketing on the Eventbrite page, and you can see more details on the event as a whole on the Piper website or the Facebook event page.

This event will be December 2, the day after the trio’s event at the Phoenix Art Museum, which is already sold out. So if you can’t make it to the Phoenix Art Museum event on Friday, December 1, the “Legacies” event is the perfect opportunity to see Joy Harjo, Rita Dove, and Sandra Cisneros in action – just make sure to get your tickets on November 4!

The Piper Center teases, “Three legends come together for the first time to discuss their paths through the American literary landscape.”

Sandra Cisneros is a poet, short story writer, novelist, and essayist whose work explores the lives of the working-class. She has received many awards, including (most recently) Chicago’s Fifth Star Award, the PEN Center USA Literary Award and the National Medal of the Arts, awarded to her by President Obama in 2016. The House on Mango Street has sold over five million copies, been translated into over twenty languages, and is required reading in elementary, high school, and universities across the nation.

Rita Dove is a former U.S. poet laureate, and she received her MFA in 1977 from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop, where she and her classmates Sandra Cisneros and Joy Harjo were the only non-white students at the time. From 1981 to 1989 she taught creative writing at Arizona State University – the final two years as the first and only African-American full professor in ASU’s English Department. Thomas and Beulah, a book she wrote while teaching at ASU, received the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in poetry. She was also the sole editor of The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry (2011). Her most recent book, Collected Poems 1974-2004, received the 2017 NAACP Image Award and was a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award. Among her many other honors are the 2011 National Medal of Arts from President Obama, the 1996 National Humanities Medal from President Clinton (making her the only poet with both national medals), and 25 honorary degrees.

Joy Harjo’s eight books of poetry include Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings, How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, and She Had Some Horses. Harjo’s memoir Crazy Brave won the PEN USA Literary Award for Creative Non-Fiction and the American Book Award. She is the recipient of the 2015 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets for proven mastery in the art of poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the United States Artist Fellowship. In 2014 she was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. A renowned musician, Harjo performs with her saxophone nationally and internationally, solo and with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. She has five award-winning CDs of music, and won a Native American Music Award for Best Female Artist of the Year in 2009.

Legacies is presented by archiTEXTS and the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing with support from the Labriola National American Indian Data Center and the University of Arizona Poetry Center.

#ArtLitPhx: Phoenix Poetry Series ft. Leah Marche & Jabari Jawan

Phoenix Poetry Series Leah Marche and Jabari Jawan

The Phoenix Poetry Series showcases some of the best poets in our community. This month spotlights Leah Marche and Jabari Jawan, who will be performing at Fillmore Coffee Co. (600 North 4th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85004) on Friday, September 22 at 6pm.

Leah Marche is a two-time Phoenix National Poetry Slam team member who has presented and performed at many events, including Scottsdale Arts’ Canal Convergence, Phoenix Art Museum Local Opener, TEDx Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ignite Phoenix, and Arizona Storytellers Project. She was listed among Phoenix New Times’ 100 Creatives, and she is also the creator of LIVE POETIC and Black Horizons Fest, a co-founder of Storyscope and BlackPoet Ventures, and part of the Talking Drum Performance Studio.

Jabari Jawan is a poet from the South Side of Chicago, Illinois who has received fellowships from the Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation and The Home School. He has performed alongside his literary mother Patricia Smith in honor of Samuel R. Delaney. His work either appears in or is forthcoming from Peregrinos y sus letras, The Shade Journal, Vinyl Poetry & Prose, and more. He is also an Associate Editor of Four Chambers Press.

As the Phoenix Poetry Series says, “We’re all about making poetry relevant in our community, and so if you’re still not convinced that poets are creating platforms and inciting change, this reading is a must!”

For more information, please visit the Facebook page.

#ArtLitPhx: The Comedy of Coping with Kim Stanley Robinson

Kim Stanley Robinson

The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing is proud to present Kim Stanley Robinson in his talk, “The Comedy of Coping, Alarm and Resolve in Climate Fiction.” The event, which will feature a talk, a Q&A, and a signing, will take place on Wednesday, September 20 from 7pm to 9pm at the Phoenix Art Museum (1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004). The event is open to the public and free.

The talk is presented by the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at ASU, a partnership between ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination and The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. More information on the talk (and an RSVP) can be found at the Virginia G. Piper Center website, but here is a bit more information about Robinson’s topic:

In his talk, Robinson will explore the story and science in his latest novel, New York 2140, to argue against gloomy, apocalyptic thinking and in favor of technological ingenuity and dynamic social change. While the effects of climate change are undeniable, the future doesn’t have to be an unavoidable catastrophe. Ultimately, Robinson argues, this kind of dystopian, pessimistic approach muddles the political, social, and economic causes of climate change and prevents us from taking more meaningful actions to address the issues before it’s too late. What kinds of stories should we be telling ourselves in the face of impending calamity? How do we balance the desire to be both inspired and disturbed? How can literature act as a constructive response to existential risk?

You can also find more information on the event’s Facebook page.

Newsletter 3/24

“Superstition

3.24.17


Contest: Show Us Your Workspace

Workspace Contest

At the end of every author interview, we ask the same question: What does your writing space look like? Now, we’re asking you!

We’re accepting entries on Twitter: Tag us in a pic, use , &  you could win a Starbucks gift card! Contest ends March 31.


Ocean Vuong and Camille Rankine Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

Poets Ocean Vuong and Camille Rankine will be reading from their work at Phoenix Art Museum (1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004) on April 7 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event is hosted by the University of Arizona Poetry Center, the Phoenix Art Museum, Literary & Prologue Society of the Southwest, ASU College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Superstition Review, ASU’s Virginia G. Piper Center For Creative Writing, and ASU Performance in the Border/Lands. After the reading, there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Ocean Vuong is the author of Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press, 2016). His writings have been featured in the Kenyon Review, GRANTA, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Poetry, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Born in Saigon, Vietnam, he lives in New York City.

Camille Rankine’s first book of poetry, Incorrect Merciful Impulses, was published in January by Copper Canyon Press. Her poetry has appeared in Atlas Review, American Poet, The Baffler, Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Octopus Magazine, Paper Darts, Phantom Books, A Public Space, Tin House, and elsewhere. She serves on the Executive Committee of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, and lives in New York City.


The Book Nerd’s Guide to Non-Readers

For bibliophiles, it can be frustrating to explain the love for the written word, especially when the response is sometimes, “People still read books?”

But the Book Nerd over at Barnes and Noble Reads has compiled a guide to non-readers that any book lover can get behind.

See the article by Barnes and Noble here.


Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Writing Playlist

Lin-Manuel Miranda, the mind behind Hamilton and the Moana soundtrack, shared on Twitter a 19-track playlist called “Write Your Way Out,” a collection of songs “about writing, songs that feature great writing, and everything in between.”

From Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan to Saul Williams and Nas, this playlist’s a great way to punch through that next bout of writer’s block.

See the full list here.


Featured Partner: Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle is a nonprofit journal of the literary arts, founded in 2007. We are always seeking critics to review the titles listed on our review shelf at http://prickofthespindle.org/reviewer-guidelines/. We are also seeking short film and visual artists for our online galleries, as well as satire for the new online section, The Corner. Submit your fiction, poetry, nonfiction, humorous pieces, reviews, interviews, artwork, and drama for the biannual print edition at https://posprint.submittable.com/submit. To purchase copies of the biannual print edition, visit http://prickofthespindle.org/shop/

 

Newsletter 2/24

“Superstition

2.24.17


Forrest Gander Poetry Reading at Phoenix Art Museum

forrest ganderPoet, translator and essayist Forrest Gander will be reading from his work at Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Avenue, on Friday March 3 at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The event is organized by the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Superstition Review and the Arizona State University College of Integrative Sciences and Arts are proud co-sponsors.

Gander is the author of the 2011 poetry collection, Core Samples from the World, which was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books include two novels, As A Friend and Trace; the poetry collections Eye Against Eye, Torn Awake, Science & Steepleflower; and the essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence. Gander’s essays have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, The New York Times Book Review and other publications. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry.


Submissions Open Until Feb. 28 

Superstition Review LogoThe deadline for submission for Superstition Review issue 19, publishing May 1st, is Feb. 28th. Our editors are reviewing submissions in Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry. Sign in to Submittable to send us your work.

 

 

 

 


8 New Books The New York Times Recommends This Week 

NYT Books

Whether you want to escape the present through a novel, or better understand the present through an enlightening piece of non-fiction, the New York Times has you covered.

There’s a novel by Margaret Drabble, a collection of short stories by Viet Thanh Nguyen, and two great non-fiction picks from Richard Haass and Pankaj Mishra.

Read the full list here.

 


16 Books Coming to the Big Screen in 2017

Books Coming to the Big Screen

Books and movies seem to have always had a strange relationship; isn’t one always better than the other? But there are a number of exciting book adaptations coming to the big screen in 2017.

From Julian Barnes’ Man Booker winning The Sense of an Ending, to the long awaited adaptation of Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, to Dave Egger’s The Circle, to even a new take on Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, there’s a lot to look forward to.

See the full list by Barnes and Noble here.

 

 


Featured Partner: Witness

Witness CoverThe new issue of Witness is about chaos, which very old references describe as a void, an absence, a state before creation. But more recent scientific use implies that randomness and disorder would make sense if we could just get a vast enough perspective.

We’ve strived toward that goal with new fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, in print and online at WitnessMag.org.

From life-changing events that take place in the womb to unexpected shifts at the end of a life, these pieces contemplate the control we work to exert or the lack of control that we endure within individual lives.

Witness Magazine

witness@unlv.edu

witnessmag.org

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Featured Partner: North American Reviewnorth american review

Submissions are open for the North American Review‘s third annual Torch Memorial Prize for Creative Nonfiction. First Prize: $500. You may submit only one piece of creative nonfiction, no longer than 30 pages in a Word document. All contact information should be entered in your cover letter. No names or addresses should appear on manuscripts, please. All submissions will be read blind. Deadline: April 1, 2017

Judge: Dinty W. Moore. More information can be found at northamericanreview.org.

 

Featured Partner: Berkeley Fiction Review

Berkeley Fiction ReviewThe Berkeley Fiction Review is one of several descendants of UC Berkeley’s Occident literary journal, which was published from 1881 to the 1960s. Established in 1981, it is now UC Berkeley’s oldest prose journal. We strive to publish short fiction that challenges the concept of the short story through unique prose, curious concepts, and engrossing narratives. We’d love for you to be a part of our literary tradition. Send your creative works to berkeleyfictionreview@gmail.com!


“When you read a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you.” – George Saunders

 

 

#ArtLitPhx: U of A Poetry Center Presents Forrest Gander

Forrest GanderForrest Gander will read poetry at the Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004 on March 3rd from 7pm to 9pm.

Local poet Giancarlo Huapaya will open.

After the reading there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Superstition Review is proud to co-sponsor this event with The Poetry Center at The University of Arizona.

See The Poetry Center’s website for more information.

Forrest Gander is a poet, translator, essayist, and editor of several anthologies of writing from Spain and Mexico. His 2011 poetry collection Core Samples from the World was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award and his works include novels and poetry. His essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, and the New York Times Book Review, among others. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, and Whiting Foundations, and he has received two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative Poetry.

#ArtLitPhx: Author + Talk with Jan Krulick-Belin

AuthorTalkJan

Arizona Humanities presents author Jan Krulick-Belin. Belin talk is based on her book, Love, Bill: Finding My Father through Letters from World War II. The event takes place on Wednesday, November 2 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Arizona Humanities. 1242 N Central Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85004. For more information please visit the Facebook event or register here. The event is free and open to the public.

Jan Krulick-Belin is a museum and art consultant, and art and jewelry historian with nearly forty years of experience at such institutions as the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Denver Art Museum, Beaumont (Texas) Art Museum, and Smithsonian Institution. Retired as Director of Education at the Phoenix Art Museum, she still works with museums, art organizations, and private collectors, and serves as guest curator at the Sylvia Plotkin Judaica Museum in Phoenix.