#ArtLitPhx: Art for Justice with Nikky Finney

artlitphx

Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Time: 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: Singer Hall, Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004
Cost: Free, please RSVP here.

Event Description:
The University of Arizona Poetry Center is proud to present Nikky Finney, who will read from her work commissioned for the Poetry Center’s Art for Justice grant.  After the reading, there will be a short Q&A and a book signing.

Please note: while this event is open to the public and free, you must RSVP in order to attend. Seats may be available the day of the event. However, as seating is limited, we recommend reserving your seats in advance. Any unclaimed seats will be released to the public five minutes before the start of the reading.

The University of Arizona Poetry Center’s Art for Justice grant funds a three-year project that will commission new work from leading writers in conversation with the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States, with the goal of creating new awareness and empathy through presentation and publication.  In particular, through the work of leading poets, the project will seek to confront racial inequities within the criminal justice system to promote social justice and change.  Learn more about the project.

Readings in Phoenix are presented in collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museum and with support from lead sponsor the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, with additional support from the ASU Creative Writing Program, the Literary & Prologue Society, and Superstition Review.

About the Author:
Nikky Finney was born by the sea in South Carolina and raised during the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Black Arts Movements. She began reading and writing poetry as a teenager growing up in the spectacle and human theatre of the deep South. At Talladega College, she began to autodidactically explore the great intersections between art, history, politics, and culture. These same arenas of exploration are ongoing today in her writing, teaching and spirited belief in one-on-one activism. She is the author of four books of poetry, On Wings Made of Gauze, RICE, The World Is Round, and Head Off & Split, which won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2011. She has written extensively for journals, magazines, and other publications. For twenty-one years she taught creative writing at the University of Kentucky and now holds the John Bennett, Jr., Chair in Creative Writing and Southern Letters at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She travels extensively, never lecturing, always inviting and hoping for conversations that just might improve the human condition.

#ArtLitPhx: PhxArt Amplified 2019

#artlitphx

 

Time: 12pm-8pm

Event Description:

Sound and art converge for PhxArt Amplified, an all-day, all-ages experience at Phoenix Art Museum. Live, acoustic, and experimental performances by local musicians will take over our galleries and spaces.

Early bird tickets available for a limited time:
Adults — $20
Ages 21 and under — $10
Free Museum Members and children under 6

Lineup, schedule, and more information will be available soon. Please check this event again or phxart.org/amplified.

#ArtLitPhx: Scandinavian Pain Film Series

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Date: January 9, 2018

Time: 6:00pm-7:30pm

Tickets

Event Description:

A four-part film series inspired by the exhibition “Ragnar Kjartansson: Scandinavian Pain and Other Myths.”
Free for Members
$5 for non-Members

Arctic Superstar, Simen Braathen, 2016. Norway, Samí with English subtitles. 72 mins., Not Rated.

The indigenous, Samí rapper Nils Rune Utsi – aka SlinCraze – lives with his mother in Máze, a nearly abandoned town in the Arctic Highlands of Norway. His dream is to make a living from his music and maybe even become world famous. The only problem is that less than 20,000 people speak his endangered language.

Courtesy of Indie Films.

#ArtLitPhx: Scandinavian Pain Film Series

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Date: December 19, 2018

Time: 6:00pm-7:00pm

Tickets

Event Description:

A four-part film series inspired by the exhibition “Ragnar Kjartansson: Scandinavian Pain and Other Myths.”
Free for Members
$5 for non-Members

We Call It Skwee, Iacopo Patierno and David Giese, 2009. 61 mins. Not Rated.

A film about music, people and Scandinavia by Iacopo Patierno and David Giese.

We Call It Skweee follows the Swedish and Finnish pioneers from the Scandinavian’s hometowns to Barcelona, covers the Sonar show and sketches the history of an unusual Scandinavian music phenomenon.

In early 2008, Italian filmmaker Iacopo Patierno arrived in Stockholm to assist Erik Gandini on his film Videocracy. While in Sweden he discovered the quirky Scandinavian electro style Skweee and befriended some of its practitioners. Active in the Dubstep scene back home with the audiovisual project Biologic, Patierno became fascinated with the music as well as the determination and individuality of the artists involved. Camera in hand, he decided to follow some of the central Skweee artists for a year, starting in the functionalist Stockholm suburbs, traversing the Baltic to Helsinki, and eventually tripping down to Barcelona’s legendary Sonar festival, where eight Swedish and Finnish artists were invited to represent the scene.

Image courtesy of We Call It Skweee.

#ArtLitPhx: Poetry Reading: Sara Sams and Charles Simic

#artlitphxOctober 3, 7pm

This is a free event open to the public.
Reserve your spot at tickets.phxart.org

 

About the poets:

Sara Sams is a poet, essayist, and translator from Oak Ridge, Tennessee. She currently works as an instructor for Arizona State University’s College of Interdisciplinary Humanities & Communications, where she provides faculty support for the Superstition Review. She is a graduate of Davidson College (B.A.) and Arizona State University (M.F.A.), and has received teaching fellowships from the Ministry of Education of Spain and the National University of Singapore. – Saraesams.com

Charles Simic is perhaps our most disquieting muse. There are few poets writing in America today who share his lavish appetite for the bizarre, his inexhaustible repertoire of indelible characters and gestures. -The Harvard Review on Charles Simic. Excerpt taken from Poets.org.

 

Presented with the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Sponsored by the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, the Creative Writing Program at Arizona State University, the Literary and Prologue Society of the Southwest, Superstition Review, and the Angela and Leonard Singer Endowment for Performing Arts.

Right image credit: Beowulf Sheehan, from Poets.org

#ArtLitPhx: Poetry Reading: Morgan Parker and Tommy Pico

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This is a free event open to the public.
Reserve your spot at tickets.phxart.org

About the poets:

Morgan Parker is the author of Other People’s Comfort Keeps Me Up At Night (Switchback Books, 2015) and There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyonce (Tin House Books, 2017). She is a Cave Canem graduate fellow and a Pushcart Prize winner. With poet Angel Nafis, she runs The Other Black Girl Collective, an internationally touring Black Feminist poetry duo. She lives in Brooklyn. -Poetry Foundation

Tommy Pico is a writer and karaoke enthusiast. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he currently lives in Brooklyn. -Poetry Foundation

Presented with the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Sponsored by the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, the Creative Writing Program at Arizona State University, the Literary and Prologue Society of the Southwest, Superstition Review, and the Angela and Leonard Singer Endowment for Performing Arts.

#ArtLitPhx: “Cli-Fi Bodies, Heart-Born Worlds” with Lidia Yuknavitch

 

National bestselling author Lidia Yuknavitch presents her talk “Cli-Fi Bodies, Heart-Born Worlds” First Friday, March 2nd, 2018 in the Whiteman Hall at the Phoenix Art Museum (1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85004) at 7:00 p.m.

A growing number of contemporary Cli Fi novels are changing what we mean when we say dystopian fiction—Station Eleven, Borne, American War, Future Home of the Living God, and The Book of Joan are all examples where authors are asking how we might radically reinvent our relationship with the planet, each other, and ourselves. What if we loved the planet the way we claim to love our partners or children? What if being meant understanding our existence as relational to eco-systems and animals? What if that stuff we are made of, the matter of the cosmos and universe, isn’t as “out there” as we pretend; what if the stories inside of us, including our biology and physiology, our consciousness and emotions, have everything to do with what is around us? What if parallel universes or timelines—as reflected in new scientific discoveries as well as ancient indigenous forms of knowing—are informing our present tense? New directions in narrative help us ask more interesting questions about ourselves and the world—or worlds—we inhabit.

You can find out more information about about the event at at the Virginia G. Piper Center website and tickets here, but here are a few more details:

Lidia Yuknavitch is the author of the National Bestselling novels The Book of Joan and The Small Backs of Children, winner of the 2016 Oregon Book Award’s Ken Kesey Award for Fiction as well as the Reader’s Choice Award, the novel Dora: A Headcase, and three books of short stories. Her widely acclaimed memoir The Chronology of Water was a finalist for a PEN Center USA award for creative nonfiction and winner of a PNBA Award and the Oregon Book Award Reader’s Choice. She founded the workshop series Corporeal Writing in Portland Oregon, where she also teaches Women’s Studies, Film Studies, Writing, and Literature. She received her doctorate in Literature from the University of Oregon. She lives in Oregon with her husband Andy Mingo and their renaissance man son, Miles. She is a very good swimmer.