Meet the Interns: Emily Beckley

Poetry Editor Emily Beckley is entering her senior year here at Arizona State pursuing a bachelor’s degree in English Literature. Upon graduating in December, she plans to utilize her degree to get herself into graduate school to study publishing. Originally from Chicago, Emily hopes to move to the northwest after graduation to follow her dream of working in the editing/publishing field and also hopes to one day publish her own poetry for the masses. This is Emily’s premier semester at Superstition Review.

1.   What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

I am a poetry editor for Superstition Review. I handle poetry submissions along with my fellow poetry editor, April Stolarz. This process involves reading submissions and giving my personal feedback in terms of quality and vision as it pertains to the finished product of the upcoming issue of Superstition Review. Outside of content editing, I participate in spreading the word about Superstition Review and increasing awareness for future writers who wish to submit.

2.   Why did you decide to get involved with Superstition Review?

I am graduating in December, and I am really trying to get myself some real world experience in the field in which I intend to seek employment. I want to work in the publishing industry; this internship will definitely give me the advantage when seeking a job. Also, I will be applying for graduate school and any internship will set me apart from other applicants.

3.   How do you like to spend your free time?

I like to spend my free time reading and writing poetry. Being a literature major, I tend to always be reading something that is assigned to me. So, I cherish the times I have to read works of my own choosing. I also love seeing shows around the valley with friends or taking day trips around the state on the weekend. I am also a thrift shopping addict, yikes!

4.   What other position(s) for Superstition Review would you like to try out?

If I were to have another position, I think being an art editor would be really exciting. I don’t have any experience with art, other than my own personal interests. But, handling submissions of people’s artwork would be really exciting and interesting.

5.   Describe one of your favorite literary works.

My favorite poet of all time would have to be Gary Snyder. All of his work speaks to me on a very personal level; the calm that ensues from reading his poetry lifts my mood instantly! “Rip Rap” is by far my favorite poem of his. I think I have learned a lot from his writing, and have carried a bit of Snyder into my own style.

6.   What are you currently reading?

Currently, I am reading Shopgirl by Steve Martin and Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

7.   Creatively, what are you currently working on?

I try to fit in as much time as I can every week to allow myself to write freely. I love writing poetry; it’s a very cathartic experience for me. I keep a portfolio of my work and try to update it every month with some solid pieces that I think will be worth someone’s time in the future when I explore writing as a career.

8.   What inspires you?

I feel that every day holds moments of beauty and poetry. I challenge myself to notice these moments and treasure them. Often, I write lyric poems praising small and seemingly insignificant occurrences or objects, even images and realizations that I think will bring a smile to my face one day going back and reading my own work. I also tend to write a lot of confessional style poetry. It can feel very cleansing when experiencing struggles in life.

9.   What are you most proud of?

I am proud of my positive attitude and appreciation for life. Not everyone can say that they are truly happy, and I take pride in knowing that I have taken the right steps to be just where I want and need to be in life.

10.   Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

In 10 years I hope to be working in the publishing industry and have published some of my own poetry. I would love it if I had the opportunity to share my work with the public and make a career out of something I am so passionate about.

Meet the Interns: April Stolarz

Poetry Editor April Stolarz is a senior at ASU pursuing concurrent degrees in Print/Online Journalism and Creative Writing with a focus on Poetry. Along with her Superstition Review internship April also writes for ASU’s Media Relations Office and freelances for a variety of publications. She has studied poetry under Norman Dubie and Terry Hummer and is currently studying under Sally Ball. She maintains a blog about local music, Dose of Rock, and hopes to work for a music publication someday. This is April’s first experience with Superstition Review.

 

1. What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

I am one of the poetry editors for Superstition Review’s Spring 2011 issue. I am responsible for reviewing poetry submissions and voting for certain poems to be published. Once those poems are given the go ahead I contact the authors and send them final proofs to be featured in the magazine.

2. Why did you decide to get involved with Superstition Review?

I’ve always loved words and any form of expression, especially written expression. In high school I was the editor of my literary magazine and absolutely loved being a part of that process. I wanted to expand my knowledge and be a part of the next step in order to gain more professional experience.

3. How do you like to spend your free time?

My life is a balancing act of 18 credits and multiple jobs. Most of my free time is swallowed up by writing; I freelance for various publications. My absolute favorite thing to do is see live music. I try to spend as much time as possible at concerts and music festivals. Other than that I love reading, being outside and doing anything outdoorsy.

4. What other position(s) for Superstition Review would you like to try out?

I’d like to be the non fiction editor, interview editor and web design editor. I think they’d all be a great learning experience and equally as interesting and fun.

5. Describe one of your favorite literary works.

A simple story about a girl with extremely large thumbs that manages to encompass wide-ranging and heart-aching themes such as religion, sexuality, marriage, freedom, traveling, magic and everything in between. This book, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues by Tom Robbins, is a journey through the human experience with rainbow colored sprinkles, whipped cream, hot fudge and a cherry on top. Tom Robbins is the master of metaphor, and he’s not afraid to show it.

6. What are you currently reading?

Every chance I get (which isn’t as often as I’d like) I reach for one of the books on my shelf. I’m currently thumbing through and trying to digest: Skinny Legs And All by Tom Robbins, Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke, Book of Longing by Leonard Cohen and Transformations of Myth Through Time by Joseph Campbell.

7. Creatively, what are you currently working on?

As a poetry senior in the capstone writing class I’m working on a new poem every week and a new revision as much as possible. For one of my jobs I’m writing a feature story about a professor for ASU’s website. I blog about local music a few times a month and am working on updating my personal website.

8. What inspires you?

Inspiration is everywhere and nowhere at the same time. Discovering new things, reading a certain word, being outside, spontaneity, vibrancy, color, conversation, cities, people who aren’t afraid to say what they think and do what they want, trees, the sky, free spirits, people who take the different path, who aren’t afraid to travel and explore.

9. What are you most proud of?

This is a weird question for me. While I’ve always prided myself on doing very well in school while simultaneously being involved in other things, what’s given me the most internal pride and satisfaction has been helping my friends realize their dreams.

10. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

I don’t think about the future; it comes soon enough. But I hope I’m living in a beautiful place, maybe an island somewhere, maybe another continent, surrounded by a strong community of friends, music and love. By then I hope I’ll be working in some form of music business whether it be for a music magazine such as Spin or for some other music company. I hope my life is filled with laughter.

Meet The Interns: Brandy Winchester

Brandy Winchester is a senior at Arizona State University. She plans on graduating in May of 2011 with a Bachelor in English Literature, and a minor in Anthropology. After her graduation she would like to attend a law school in Arizona. Her long term career goals consist of graduating from law school to then go onto practicing in family law; specializing in divorce cases. This is her first intern position at Superstition Review and she looks forward to the experience.

1. What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

My current position is Poetry Editor, and my responsibilities consist of composing a list of poets to contact for submission, receiving and reviewing poetry submissions, maintaining contact with the poets, and assisting with the finalizing of the selected poetry for publishing.

2. Why did you decide to get involved with Superstition Review?

I have always had a passion for poetry, and I found Superstition Review to be a great way for me to become involved in the publishing of poetry.

3. Besides interning for Superstition Review, how do you spend your time?

Being a full-time student I spend most of my time on campus, and when I am not on campus I enjoy spending my time with friends and family, and volunteering on the weekends at local animal shelters.

4. What other position(s) for Superstition Review would you like to try out?

I would be interested in trying the fiction editor position because of my love for creative writing.

5. Describe one of your favorite literary works.

My favorite literary work is Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison. This piece is my favorite because it is a touching story that takes the reader through a trip “to the other side.” The issues presented in the book are raw but also life altering; a book for every reader.

6. What are you currently reading?

I am currently reading Dante Alighieri’s Inferno.

7. Creatively, what are you currently working on?

I am currently working on my personal statement for my applications to law school.

8. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

In 10 years I see myself with a B.A. in English Literature, and a J.D. in law. I will be practicing family law; specializing in divorce cases. And I hope that I am still living life to the fullest every day!

 

Where Are They Now?: Haley Larson

Haley Larson, Poetry Editor for Issue 3, received her Bachelors Degree in Psychology and with a minor in Music from the University of Nebraska. I took some time to catch up with her about her experience and how Superstition Review has helped shaped her future.

 

Superstition Review: Which issue did you work on with Superstition Review and what was your position?

Haley Larson: I worked on Issue 3 of Superstition Review. I was one of two poetry editors that year, and it was quite an opportunity. I had the chance to correspond with some esteemed poets, many of whom I’d admired for some time.

SR: What skills did you take away from the experience?

HL: I owe a lot of my confidence and tenacity to the Superstition Review internship. A huge part of the internship is learning to not only embody but also balance professionalism and confidence. I think such professionalism encompasses a whole mess of other skills: organization, prioritizing, meeting deadlines, even–can I say–eloquence in emails. The confidence translates into so many other outlets, whether this includes applying for graduate programs or submitting one’s own work to a literary journal. Trish was kind enough to grant me a wonderful opportunity to flex these skills at AWP’s most recent conference. I had the chance to be a part of a presenting panel with her and representatives from two other undergraduate literary magazines. She was (is!) a fantastic, generous mentor. The experience continues.

SR: Creatively, what are you currently working on?

HL: I am working on a few different projects, most obsessively, a couple of different series of poetry. I’m trying to explore/exploit some of my background in music and psychology through this, allowing music, sound/silence, communication, and disorder to talk and tangle in my work.

SR: What are some of your career highlights after leaving SR?

HL: I am currently pursuing my MFA degree in poetry at Colorado State University. I’ve had opportunities to teach at CSU, intern with the Colorado Review, and co-curate a student reading series. A few journals have been kind enough to publish a poem or two, even a couple of my reviews. A few colleagues and I are working to start a non-profit organization, The Strophe Project, aimed at forming and facilitating writing communities in underserved populations of Fort Collins. You can learn more at www.thestropheproject.wordpress.com.

Meet The Interns: Jason Wright

Jason Wright is an ASU senior majoring in Creative Writing with a focus on Poetry, and an Arizona native. He has studied under such poets as Sally Ball and Norman Dubie, and is currently examining the effects of poetic form under the guidance of Terry Hummer. Having grown up around computers, he is also very tech and internet savvy, and currently boasts a day-job doing web design and development for a small business in Glendale, AZ.

Superstition Review: What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

Jason Wright: I am a Poetry Editor and I am responsible for working with my co-editor to solicit poets for publication with the magazine this issue, in addition to researching their work and negotiating with said poets. I will also be responsible for voting for my favorite works to be published within the magazine.

SR: Why did you decide to get involved with Superstition Review?

JW: I decided to get involved with the magazine because I wanted to have a taste of editorship within a magazine–both for experience, and to see if it is something I may be interested in.

SR: Besides interning for Superstition Review, how do you spend your time?

JW: Besides interning for SR, I spend my time teaching myself various web development techniques, studying poetry, writing poetry, writing music, playing guitar, and working for a small business.

SR: What other position(s) for Superstition Review would you like to try out?

JW: I would be willing to try out the photoshop editor and the web design position in upcoming issues.

SR: Describe one of your favorite literary works.

JW: One of my favorite literary works is The Illiad, because I think Homer does a fantastic job weaving the depiction of battle into his epic poetry.

SR: What are you currently reading?

JW: I am currently reading Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange and Charlaine Harris’ Definitely Dead.

SR: Creatively, what are you currently working on?

JW: Creatively, I’m working on building, from scratch, a linux-based media storage server for my apartment, and am also working on building a story for a contemporary-styled epic poem about Greece’s birth.

SR: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

JW: In 10 years, I will hopefully have written a few books of poetry, will have a steady job involving web development, will have learned Java and will be able to write applications for Android phones, and will have written, produced and released at least one album of music. Or, at the very least, two of these things.

Meet the Interns: Haley Coles, Poetry Editor

Haley Coles is a junior English major with a Creative Writing concentration.

Superstition Review: What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

Haley Coles: I am one of two poetry editors. I review submitted poetry for consideration in Superstition Review. At the beginning of the semester I created a list of 20 previously published poets from whom to solicit work from. It is my job to decide which poems, solicited and not, will be published in the journal.

SR: How did you hear about Superstition Review and what made you decide to get involved?

HC: I received an e-mail from one of the English advisors about the internship. For the past few years I have had a desire to work on a literary journal, and once the opportunity came I jumped on it!

SR: What are you hoping to take away from your Superstition Review experience?

HC: I’d like to leave SR with two new awareness. The first is, as a poet, to understand how work is selected for publication in journals so I might be more conscious about how I format my own submitted work. With the huge amount of submissions I am reading as an editor, I have more empathy for editors of larger journals and know that the rejections sent are truly not about the poet as a person. Secondly, I hope that my experience with SR will qualify me for future work in other journals. And I suppose I have a third expectation: reading a TON of poetry!!

SR: Describe one of your favorite literary or artistic works.

HC: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce has been one of the most influential works I’ve read in my literary career. I read it for a British Literature class last semester, and it completely changed my artistic life. The book helped me to make the transformation from a woman who is good at writing and enjoys doing so to living my life as a committed poet. Though I don’t have much in common with early-twentieth century Irish Stephen Daedalus, I found myself enraptured by his complex yet persistent desire to freely create and live in his art. I have been truly inspired by his journey.

SR: What are you currently reading?

HC: I just finished House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski. I’m about to start on either Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke or The Plague by Albert Camus.

SR: Who would be the Superstition Review contributor of your dreams?

HC: Sylvia Plath–nobody said they had to be alive! Sylvia Plath was the first poet whose work moved me, and as a result inspired me to be a poet. In almost every poem I write there is a nod to her extraordinary language.

SR: Do you prefer reading literary magazines online or in print?

HC: I definitely prefer reading journals in print. There is something substantial and comforting about being able to hold a journal in my hands, to rest it on my chest while I lay on the couch, to circle passages that intrigue me, and to fold down pages to return to.

SR: Do you write or create art? What are you currently working on?

HC: I write poetry. I am taking a forms class, so I’m consistently writing for that class. Right now, today, I am working on reading rather than writing. I just finished a poem that exhausted me and am giving it a week or so to come back to it for a revision. So until then, I am rebuilding my aesthetic by reading submissions coming into Superstition Review and various other literary journals, particularly MAR and Rattle.

SR: Besides interning for Superstition Review, how do you spend your time?

HC: I attend ASU full time. When I’m not in class or studying (which is a huge chunk of my life), I like to cook, read, play Risk, ride bikes, and make fun of my cats.

SR: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

HC: In 10 years I will be 30. By this time I will have my MFA in Poetry and could be working on or have already received my PhD. I will be teaching either high school Literature or college Poetry. I will have a part in a vegan community-oriented restaurant cooperative. I will be gardening and writing a lot and will have at least one book of poems published. I might be in Berlin or on the East Coast.

Meet the Interns: Amber Mosure, Poetry Editor

ambermosure_0_0Amber Mosure is serving on the Poetry and Art Team as one of our two Poetry Editors. She is a senior this semester, and is a student of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, majoring in English Literature.

Superstition Review: What do you do for SR?

Amber Mosure: I send out solicitations for poetry contributors to SR. I read submissions and make a decision on who will be published in the poetry section of the magazine. I send out acceptance and rejection emails. I write interview questions to ask potential interviewees.

SR: How did you hear about or get involved with Superstition Review?

AM: I am a returning staff member. Last semester was my first issue with SR. It was the 3rd issue. I did funding and development last semester. I heard about the opportunity to come back on board as poetry editor. I thought that would be fun and exciting, so I accepted.

SR: What is your favorite section of SR?

AM: I like poetry. It’s mainly what I write so I’m partial to it.

SR: Who is your dream contributor to the journal?

AM: It’s a tie between Lydia Lunch and musician/writer/songwriter, Nick Cave, but I’d have to say Lydia. She is a musician, actress, writer, photographer, performance artist. She is internationally known. She’s released numerous musical, as well as, spoken word albums. I love the art of spoken word and she is very candid, captivating, and intense with it. She’s well-known in the underground. She got her career start as lead singer for the late 1970s nu-wave band Teenage Jesus and The Jerks.

SR: What job, other than your own, would you like to try out in the journal?

AM: Art Editor.

SR: What are you most excited for in the upcoming issue?

AM: Picking contributors.

SR: What artist have you really connected with, either in subject matter, work, or motto?

AM: Kathy Acker. Her writing is very post-modern in style, almost poetically schizophrenic but eerily makes sense when directly applied to one’s own personal experiences with people and the world. I have connected with her works in the last couple years. Of her works, I’ve read: Don Quixote, Empire of the Senseless, In Memoriam to Identity, Great Expectations, and Pussy King of the Pirates.

SR: What are some of your favorite websites to waste time on or distract you from homework?

AM: Facebook, band websites.

SR: What would be your dream class to take at ASU? What would the title be and what would it cover?

AM: John Waters: A Study in the Art of Bad Taste. It would cover his life, his art, his movies, his writings. It would include other notables in the art of bad taste.

SR: Do you write? Tell us about a project you’re working on.

AM: I am in the process of pitching a synopsis for a co-authored screenplay entitled “Celebrity Matters.” It’s pretty raunchy, but looking at the films being released by major production companies gives me great hope.

 

Get to know more staff next week!