Splash of Red

Splash of Red is an international online literary arts magazine that publishes poetry, fiction, non-fiction, art, interviews, and graphic narratives. They have published interviews with many Pulitzer Prize winners, US Poet Laureates, and acclaimed writers as well as some of the top editors and publishers in the country for their Industry Interview Series. What sets these interviews apart from others is that they focus on the readers of the literary magazine, many of whom are writers themselves. The interviews delve into writing processes of the interviewess, editing techniques, and strategies for getting around writer’s block. And the Industry Series investigates the other side of the table that writers rarely get a glimpse into in order to better their odds at getting their work published. But the meat of the publication is the fantastic submissions that come from all over the world.

The name of the publication comes from three inspirations: 1) the infamous red ink in draft after draft to get the best quality writing, 2) the blood and passion that goes into only the most skillfully crafted art, and 3) great work stands out just like a splash of red.
In 2010, Splash of Red organized numerous live events where authors came to speak with audiences for live Q and As. Some of the authors included Pulitzer Prize winning author Junot Diaz, famed writer Eleanor Herman, and Daniel Wallace – author of Big Fish, who spoke with eager audience members following a showing of the film based on his novel at a local independent theater. Additionally, the online magazine involved local communities by spearheading a special public mural on the New Jersey boardwalk in Asbury Park. Three artists chose three poems published on the website and created pieces of art inspired by and including those poems which were then painted in multiple, large murals across the backdrop of the mid-Atlantic.

Interested fans can follow Splash of Red on Twitter, Facebook, or become a member and get email updates about newly published work and events. One of the things they pride themselves on is creating an online literary arts community where readers can post comments on anything published on the website, submit art inspired by splashes of red for their Red Gallery, and involving members in creative decisions and directions for the publication including suggestions for interviewees.

If you take any one thing away from this blog post, take this: check it out. The website is www.SplashOfRed.net and feel free to peruse, read, comment, and investigate at your own leisure. Make it your own and enjoy!

Deadline January 31st: Third Coast Fiction and Poetry Contests

Third Coast is accepting new submissions for a Fiction and Poetry Contest.

Contributors have the opportunity to submit one previously unpublished story (up to 9,000 words), or three previously unpublished poems for a chance at winning a $1000 prize and publication in Third Coast. This year’s judges include award-winning novelist Jaimy Gordon and Major Jackson, poet and author of Leaving Saturn. The $16 reading fee includes a 1-year subscription to Third Coast.

Third Coast is accepting both mailed and online submissions. Mailed submissions must have be postmarked by the January 31, 2012 deadline. Winners will be announced April 2012.

You can find more information about how to submit and contest guidelines on Third Coast.

Author Bios

As we busily work toward the publication or our first issue, we are in the process of collecting bios for the 31 contributors that will have their work published in our April issue.

We at Superstition Review believe that knowing a little about the author often enhances the understanding of their work – it will also give you the opportunity to discover what authors you like and will give you the chance to find out more about them.

But remember, many writers will purposely write something that they have not personally experienced in an attempt to broaden their scope.

So keep your eyes peeled for more information about the writers that will be featured in the April issue of Superstition Review!

Basic Rules for Great Poetry

While poetry is most often seen as a ‘free-flow’ or emotional exercise, poetry has a long standing history of rigid form. (Shakespeare anyone?)

And while using a free write exercise for poetry has its place, there is something to be said for using a healthy balance of emotion and form to create a spectacular poem.

To find a good balance for your poetry, try some of the following suggestions:

1. Figure out your form: Whether you chose to write a sestina or a free verse poem, sometimes choosing a form can help get your creative juices flowing. And remember–you can always modify the form after you write the poem, or even while the poem is being written.

2. Line Breaks: No matter what form you’re using for your poem, well placed line breaks are key to the way that your poem comes across to readers. Use shorter line breaks to make your poem have a faster pace, and longer ones to make your poem read more slowly. Be sure that you read your poem out loud after you’ve written it to make sure that you change any lines that may appear to break in awkward places.

3. Grammar; it’s not just for essays: A problem that we sometimes see here at Superstition Review is poetry that lacks (or sometimes overuses) grammar. Remember, in a poem, a comma still acts as a small pause, just like a period signifies the end of a sentence. Therefore, a free verse poem that is written without using periods is like one large run on sentence (not to say that this can’t be done, it can: but it’s hard to pull off successfully). So when it comes to grammar, tread carefully.

4. Imagery: Using images that help your readers ‘see’ and really understand what you are trying to say in your poem is important because it makes the poem more real to them.  Images are concrete pieces of an intangible expression that allow poetry to be shared by people everywhere. While imagery can sometimes represent emotions or deeper themes, a poem without any imagery stands to lose the interest of its audience and come off as paltry at best.

5. Remember your audience: While it’s sometimes easy to write poetry for the pleasure of releasing ideas or emotions, if you plan to publish a poem you need to make sure that it will be understood by your audience. That means using very little ‘inside knowledge’ (meaning, something that only you understand) or rambling on without any purpose or in a way that is confusing to your reader.

If you have any questions regarding our submission guidelines at Superstition Review, feel free to visit our Submissions Page or e-mail us with additional questions.

What Are Our Submission Guidelines?

For those of you who have been considering submitting some of your work to Superstition Review, I am posting our Submission Guidelines below. To view the full list of what we require for potential publication, please click here.

Superstition Review is published twice yearly in May and December. We welcome submissions of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art. The Submission deadline for our next issue is March 15, 2008. No previously published works are accepted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but please alert Superstition Review to a piece’s potential publication elsewhere.

All submissions must be done electronically. No paper submissions will be considered for publication.

Superstition Review acquires one-time rights to accepted submissions. All rights subsequently revert to author.

Please email each genre separately for multiple submissions, and allow up to three months for reading and reporting on submissions.

Also, please wait to hear from Superstition Review before sending more work after an initial submission.

Thank You All So Much!

Superstition Review Cycle

The submissions for our Inaugural Issue have continued to pour in at an amazing speed!

Many thanks to those who have submitted work, attended readings, and offered their support to Superstition Review. Our existence would not be possible without the help of amazing readers and writers like you.