Governor’s Arts Awards

Intern Veronica Martinez comments on Superstition Review‘s nomination for a Governor’s Arts Award.

On Tuesday April 14th the arts and cultural community will gather for the 2009 Governor’s Arts Awards. The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented annually by the Office of the Governor, the Arizona Commission on the Arts, and Arizona Citizens for the Arts. This year we are excited that Superstition Review has been nominated in the Arts in Education Category; this category recognizes an Arizona individual or organization for an outstanding contribution to arts in education.

As a current intern with Superstition Review, I am very glad to be a part of such a project that not only provides a great opportunity to ASU students but also helps to engage and build the literary community in Arizona.

Amber Mosure, also a current intern, had this to mention about SR: “I really like all the hands-on experience I’m getting with my internship with Superstition Review. I feel very confident that I’m gaining very pertinent inside knowledge about what goes into putting together a literary publication and being involved in creating the final product is very rewarding and satisfying.”

So join us in congratulating Superstition Review on this nomination with special thanks to, Patricia Murphy, Managing Editor, for taking on this endeavor and together with ASU students producing a wonderful literary publication that we all can feel rewarded with. We will be rooting for SR!

For more information about the 2009 Governor’s Arts Awards click here.

Basic Rules for Great Poetry

While poetry is most often seen as a ‘free-flow’ or emotional exercise, poetry has a long standing history of rigid form. (Shakespeare anyone?)

And while using a free write exercise for poetry has its place, there is something to be said for using a healthy balance of emotion and form to create a spectacular poem.

To find a good balance for your poetry, try some of the following suggestions:

1. Figure out your form: Whether you chose to write a sestina or a free verse poem, sometimes choosing a form can help get your creative juices flowing. And remember–you can always modify the form after you write the poem, or even while the poem is being written.

2. Line Breaks: No matter what form you’re using for your poem, well placed line breaks are key to the way that your poem comes across to readers. Use shorter line breaks to make your poem have a faster pace, and longer ones to make your poem read more slowly. Be sure that you read your poem out loud after you’ve written it to make sure that you change any lines that may appear to break in awkward places.

3. Grammar; it’s not just for essays: A problem that we sometimes see here at Superstition Review is poetry that lacks (or sometimes overuses) grammar. Remember, in a poem, a comma still acts as a small pause, just like a period signifies the end of a sentence. Therefore, a free verse poem that is written without using periods is like one large run on sentence (not to say that this can’t be done, it can: but it’s hard to pull off successfully). So when it comes to grammar, tread carefully.

4. Imagery: Using images that help your readers ‘see’ and really understand what you are trying to say in your poem is important because it makes the poem more real to them.  Images are concrete pieces of an intangible expression that allow poetry to be shared by people everywhere. While imagery can sometimes represent emotions or deeper themes, a poem without any imagery stands to lose the interest of its audience and come off as paltry at best.

5. Remember your audience: While it’s sometimes easy to write poetry for the pleasure of releasing ideas or emotions, if you plan to publish a poem you need to make sure that it will be understood by your audience. That means using very little ‘inside knowledge’ (meaning, something that only you understand) or rambling on without any purpose or in a way that is confusing to your reader.

If you have any questions regarding our submission guidelines at Superstition Review, feel free to visit our Submissions Page or e-mail us with additional questions.

General Submission Guidelines

To find out more about Submission requirements for literary magazines in general, be sure to check out the Poet’s Market 2008. According to thePoet’s Market 2008 Editorial Review on Amazon.com, the Poet’s Market 2008 helps writers “find all the information necessary to research markets and submit poetry for publication. In addition to market listings, the 2008 Poet’s Market provides how-to material on preparing and submitting manuscripts, identifying markets, relating to editors, and other solid information that makes the book an ideal beginner’s resource as well as a trusted marketing guide that seasoned poets turn to year after year. Includes the latest developments in poetry writing and publishing through Insider Reports by and about working poets and editors.”