Jordan Dahlen: Winner of 2016 Homecoming Writing Contest in Poetry

Every year, ASU holds the Homecoming Writing Contest to encourage aspiring writers to continue their craft. Here at Superstition Review, we were so excited to hear that one of our trainees, Jordan Dahlen, won first place in the poetry category!

Great job Jordan. Keep writing!

Contributor Update, Deborah Bogen: Winner of the New Letters Poetry Award

Deborah Bogen

Deborah Bogen

New Letters is a literary magazine that has an annual writing contest. Each year, three writers are chosen to receive $1,500 and publication in the magazine. This year, Deborah Bogen was chosen as the winner in the poetry section.

Deborah Bogen has contributed poetry to Superstition Review twice. To read her poems featured in issue 4, click here. For her work in issue 12, click here.

To learn more about the New Letters writing contest, click here.

Tempe Community Writing Contest and Cover Design Contest Deadline Extended– Submit Today!

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The Tempe Community Writing and Cover Design Contest deadline has been extended, and is now OPEN for creative writing submissions until Monday February 22, 2016! Submissions are accepted in poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction (memoirs, essays). ASU undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in any on-ground campus are invited to submit, as well as Tempe community residents including high school students and adults.

This is a great opportunity for emerging writers to get published! Winners will be selected in each genre and age group. Winning submissions will be published in the Tempe Writer’s Forum v.2 to be released in April 2016.

Winners will be recognized at a celebration at the Tempe Public Library on April 13 and will read from their work. Friends and family are invited to attend!

Click here for more contest information and the submission link.

Jerry Eckert: “Mahlapane’s Story” in Pooled Ink

Jerry Eckert’s “Mahlapane’s Story” (Issue 5) is available in the Northern Colorado Writers’ anthology, Pooled Ink. Pooled Ink publishes and celebrates the winners of the Northern Colorado’s Writers 2011 Contests and includes works of esteemed fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and cover design work. Eckert’s “Mahlapane’s Story” originally appeared in Issue 5 of Superstition Review and you can read a full version of the story in our archives.

Jerry Eckert is a former professor who has returned to his love of writing nonfiction after years of work in his academic field. He has published nearly 200 papers, some of which were award winning. His research and policy analyses for the Office of the South African Prime Minister helped speed the downfall of the apartheid, his monograph restructured Lesotho’s agriculture, he wrote the first economic policy package for the incoming Mandela government, and his op-eds in the Christian Science Monitor influenced American’s South Africa policies. “My career was in agricultural development and policy advising overseas.  I lived these events,” Jerry notes, “I was able to earn the trust of my host nations and their governments and they sucked me in very close to the center of the action. Every country I ever lived in long-term, I entered as a technocrat and ended up working for the President or Prime Minister directly, at their request.”

In our interview, Eckert mentions that his work and his love for literary nonfiction seem to come from two different cultures: “As an academic, I wrote a lot in ‘Academic Speak’ which is not a very creative (nor easily readable) medium. I [won] a couple of ‘Best Published Article’ awards from my professional association, and those were two papers I chose to write in the language of the average person rather than for the academic with his/her Ph.D.”

Jerry started writing when his studies took him beyond Arizona borders, and he felt the loss of leaving the desert that he loved: “I wrote for Arizona outdoor magazines as a way to re-live the Arizona desert and our sky islands vicariously. I could get back home in my mind every now and then. I wrote of my favorite mountains, the Santa Ritas, I wrote of my favorite species, the Coues deer (Sonoran whitetail). I think I got hooked when I discovered that I could get paid for what were essentially my love letters to an ecosystem. I fell in love with literary nonfiction when I discovered the richness of the feelings when writing memoir, recapturing my life’s high points, and finding that readers loved the stories.”

Eckert’s nonfiction pieces have previously appeared in Matter, Pilgrimage, Memoir (and), Weber – The Contemporary, in addition to Superstition Review. His piece “The Dustbin Telegraph” will be featured in our upcoming Issue 9 of Superstition Review, which will go live April 1st. “Requiem for the Night Sky,” a lament of losing the stars and the skies to pollution, will appear in the upcoming issue of Weber – The Contemporary West. Eckert’s “Ismail,” a nonfiction piece that examines life lessons learned from following the poorest people in Pakistan, is scheduled to appear in Memoir (and). Jerry Eckert is in the final stages of finishing his memoir, Weeping Kings and Wild Boars: Adventures of a Neocolonialist.

For those seeking to enter the literary nonfiction field, Jerry advises that budding writers “keep a journal, religiously.  I didn’t and now decades later it is really hard to pull up exact sequences of who said what to whom.” Jerry also encourages young writers to “Go through life with your eyes wide open. Like a photographer goes through life always seeing light more intensely than the rest of us, the writer needs to see life more intensely that most. Jump into the thick of things and, even if being swept along by the thrill of it all, remember to watch with what I call the Writer’s Eye, knowing that you are at the same time taking field notes for an essay some day.”

Pooled Ink is currently available on Lulu.com for $11.99 (plus shipping/tax) or at NCW for $11.00. Pooled Ink will be available on Amazon and additional markets in roughly 6-8 weeks.

Northern Colorado Writers is currently hosting their Short Fiction 2012 contest, which is open until March 15th, 2012. You can find more information and guidelines for the contest at the NCW website.

Congratulations Jerry Eckert. We’re proud of all that you have accomplished and look forward to your new work.


Narrative Goes Digital

Each week we feature a blog post by one of our many talented interns here at Superstition Review. This week’s contribution comes from Nonfiction Editor Jennie Ricks.

The literary magazine Narrative has started to dig deep into the changing digital world by offering a variety of options to its readers. Its ultimate vision is to connect writers and readers around the globe, which has prompted the publication to distribute their issue online for free.

Narrative was the first literary magazine on Amazon’s Kindle; it also offers an App, which is a free download for the iPhone, iPad, and the iPod. Their readers are able to access new stories each week the second they are published, as well as watch and listen to authors speak at events, and browse and select stories from award-winning authors like Sherman Alexie, T.C. Boyle, and Joyce Carol Oates.

Not only does Narrative publish fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, it also provides unique opportunities for writing and reading. One category is the “six-word story:” authors tell their story in only six words. Cartoons, graphic stories, and audio readings are also available to readers.

Narrative offers a wide selection of writing contests for writers to hone their craft. The most recent contest targeted writers between the ages of 18 and 30. Their next contest is open to both fiction and nonfiction pieces and called the Winter 2012 Story Contest (deadline is March 31). Not only are the winner’s published, but they also walk away with cash prizes.

Narrative is an intriguing literary magazine that offers many varieties of writing and reading for individuals with different preferences. It opens up options to people who want something fun and different, and have adapted to incorporate new options for a changing digital age.

Storyville Winter 2012 Story Contest: Deadline February 15th

The Sidney Prize. Here is what you need to know.

Prize: $1,000 cash and publication in Storyville.

Final judge: Legendary editor and literary tastemaker Richard Nash.

Entry Deadline: February 15, 2012

Eligibility: Current subscribers of Storyville may submit one original, unpublished story of up to 5,000 words.

Entry fee: None, if you are a current Storyville subscriber. (Okay, so that means if you’re not a current subscriber you have to pay $4.99 for a subscription. Go to the Apple App store and subscribe, or subscribe on Kindle.) Click here for Apple iTunes. Click here to buy Storyville on Kindle.

How to Submit: Send an email with your story as a Word doc attachment to storyvilleapp1@gmail.com. In the subject line write “Sidney” and your last name.  In the body of the email include your name, phone number, email address, and (* importantly) your Apple or Kindle receipt for the subscription. If you lost it send the email address you used to subscribe to Storyville. Briefly list relevant publication credits.

Winner Announced: March 15. Publication in Storyville in April 2012.

The Sidney is named for Sidney Story, the architect of New Orleans’ famed red light district that gives Storyville its name and will be awarded to the author of the best new American story.

Storyville publishes stories from newly-published collections, giving the general reader an overview of contemporary literature as well as hand-picked gems that might not otherwise be found. This year, translated works have appeared alongside selections of big commercial houses and small presses, including Pulitzer Prize-winner Jennifer Egan’s first published work, “The Stylist,” which appeared in The New Yorker in 1989. Other writers who have graced subscribers’ screens this year include Anthony Doerr, Yiyun Li, Robert Boswell, Steven Millhauser, Emma Straub, Josip Novakovich, Lynne Tillman, Edna O’Brien, Xiaoda Xiao, Rahul Mehta, Tiphanie Yanique, Mavis Gallant, Alan Heathcock, Edwidge Danticat, Seth Fried, and more.

 

Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art 2012 Contest

The 2012 Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art Writing Contest is open for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry submissions. Contributors are welcome to submit one fiction or non-fiction piece or five poems per $14 entry fee. Judges include Anne Fadiman (The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down), Dinaw Mengestu (How to Read the Air), and Eileen Myles (Inferno: a poet’s novel). The deadline for entries is February 1, 2012.

See the Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art website for more information.