Contributor Update, Rebecca Durham

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Rebecca Durham on the release of her debut poetry collection Half-Life of Empathy. Rebecca is a poet, botanist, and artist. She has earned an M.S. in botany, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing (Poetry), and is currently working towards a Doctorate in Interdisciplinary Studies. For the last nine years, she has been researching vascular plants and lichens at the MPG Ranch, a conservation research property. Half-Life of Empathy jumps off of Rebecca’s knowledge of ecology and centers around human relationships with nature in an ever-increasingly industrialized society. In an interesting twist on nature poetry, Rebecca moves away from a human-centered view of nature and describes nature as it exists and an Earth that has regained control of itself. Half-Life of Empathy is currently available for purchase through Small Press Distribution and on Amazon.

“What a beautiful use of the words of water and geology and all things living. Durham writes a new ecological poetry, resonant, rich, and also very aware of what it means to be writing when this never-ending industrial revolution is putting all at risk.” – Juliana Spahr

Find out more about Rebecca at her website and be sure to check out her work featured in Issue 17.

Contributor Update, Luiza Flynn-Goodlett

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Luiza Flynn-Goodlett on the release of her upcoming book, Look Alive by Southeast Missouri Press and winner of the 2019 Cowles Poetry Prize. Luiza is an an award-winning author whose poems have been featured in several journals, including Triquarterly and North American Review. She has released six chapbooks, but Look Alive will be her first full-length book. It is set to be available in March of 2021 and tells of the development of the femme queer self. Look Alive is a collection of poems that assesses queerness by placing the narrator at the brunt end of societal and personal violence. The book will take its readers through a journey of queer self-discovery that involves taking to the gentle and accepting queerness of nature. It is available for preorder through Southeast Missouri Press, Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

“[Look Alive]takes you to the prairie, to the creek, to the kitchen counter, to bed—muddies you, then scrubs you clean. With a speaker who keeps your secrets and shouts your glories, Look Alive reveals the enduring territory of embodied queer womanhood—efflorescent and as susceptible to pleasure as it is to harm. Flynn-Goodlett quilts together rural origins and distance traveled, along with rich image and hardwearing language, into an impressive debut with the weight of an heirloom. If you let it, Look Alive can be the guardian inoculation that pierces you with a little taste of the big grief and the big joy so you can survive them when they come.” – Alicia Mountain

Be sure to take a look at Luiza’s website here, her Twitter here, and her work in Issue 17 here.

Contributor Update, Mark Neely

Join us in congratulating former award-winning Superstition Review contributor Mark Neely on winning the Idaho Prize for Poetry 2020 with his piece Ticker. The Idaho Prize for Poetry is an annual, national competition offering $1,000 plus publication by Lost Horse Press for a book-length poetry manuscript. Mark’s manuscript has been recognized by Lost Horse Press for its innovative way of approaching complex issues such as aging and politics. Check out what Lost Horse Press had to say about Mark Neely winning the 2020 Idaho Prize for Poetry here.

Mark is the author of Dirty Bomb, Beasts of the Hill, and Four of a Kind – check out his books for sale on Barnes&Noble! Mark currently lives in Muncie, Indiana where he is a professor of English at Ball State University.

Congratulations, Mark!

Find out more about Mark by visiting his website here and by reading his poems featured in Issue 10 here.

Contributor Update, Cameron Barnett

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor and Carol Brown Award-winning poet Cameron Barnett for being featured in the Poetry Society of America‘s poetry series, “Saying his Name.” The series is curated by Terrance Hayes and focuses on how the story of Emmett Till’s murder in the 1950s has influenced a new generation of black poets. Emmett Till was just a child at the time of his lynching and his story is still intimately tied to many people’s perceptions of what it means to be a young black boy in America. Cameron’s poem is titled “Emmett Till Haunts the Library in Money, MS” and touches on the invisibility with which black boys learn to navigate the world, a poignant and bitter dissection of the way black authors have been tucked aside and forgotten over the years. Check out the poem for yourself here.

Be sure to take a look at Cameron’s website here and his poems featured in Issue 22 here.

Contributor Update, Thomas Gresham

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Thomas “Tex” Gresham on the release of his experimental collection, Heck, Texas. Tex is a screenwriter and fiction author and is currently studying screenwriting at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. The book is a play on the stereotypical disreputable Texas town and lies somewhere between the real and imaginary. The book was released on September 4th and is available at Barnes&Noble, Bookshop, and Amazon.

The back of Heck, Texas reads: “Somewhere deep in East Texas, the hunt is on, fueled by self-hate, cough syrup, white whales, massive zits, freakshows, madness, dead pets, lost children, killer coffee, rats, Satan, good times, bad people, vomit, dementia, diarrhea, sex, and clowns. Your favorite brand of disease is back in stock. Welcome to Heck, Texas.”

Congratulations, Tex!

Stay up-to-date with Tex by visiting his website here or his Twitter here. Be sure to also take a look at his short story for Issue 21 here.

Contributor Update, Patricia Clark

We are excited to announce past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Patricia Clark is releasing a new book of poems titled Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars. Patricia Clark has been featured in the poetry sections of Issues 7, 8, and 17 of Superstition Review. Her latest book will release October 14th, but is available for pre-order at Amazon or Barnes&Noble. Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars is the sixth volume of poetry Patricia has written and focuses on the world as she sees it, through the attentive lens of an imaginative author with a keen eye for detail. The book ranges a wide variety of topics and places and will take the reader on a journey through space and emotion.

Patricia Clark’s Self-Portrait with a Million Dollars is full of her usual wide-ranging brilliance and sly wit. It’s a monk’s travelogue, a scholar’s giddy after-party. Exquisitely rendered, these poems, for all their beauty and mastery of tone and rhythm, their sprezzatura, are at once delicate and durable, by turns landmarks, monuments, and tombstones-each a fresh testament to that most marvelous of human traits, our limitless human capacity for invention, and the necessity of witness. Whoever, wherever you are, find this book. I promise, you’ll be astonished and nourished. -Daniel Lawless, Editor of Plume

Congratulations on your new book of poetry, Patricia!

Check out Patricia’s poetry featured in Issue 7 here, Issue 8 here, and Issue 17 here. Keep up-to-date with Patricia and her writing at her website here.

Contributor Update, Kathleen Winter

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Kathleen Winter on being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon. The DMQ Virtual Salon is a series in which authors share poems from their 2020 books. Kathleen released her latest book of poems titled Transformer in June of this year. It is currently on sale through Small Press Distribution. This collection of poems focuses on violence and domestic abuse, the pain that often comes with revisiting the past, and the nakedness with which one must present herself in order to discuss these things. Kathleen uses historical references and a transcendence through physical spaces we are all familiar with in order to craft a narrative that is electric with emotion. Congratulations Kathleen on the release of your new book and for being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon!

Check out Kathleen’s poetry featured in Issue 13 here and Issue 20 here. Be sure to also check out an interview she did for the Chris Rice Cooper Blog here.

Contributor Update, Sigrid Nunez

We are pleased to announce that former Superstition Review contributor Sigrid Nunez has just released a new book titled What Are You Going Through. Sigrid is a New York Times bestselling author and her newest book is one of seven she has written over her career. What Are You Going Through is narrated by a woman who uses the stories of friends, family members, and even strangers to assess the beauty of human nature through the conversations they hold. The narrator is a passive listener until she gets whirled into a life-changing encounter of her very own. What Are You Going Through is currently available for purchase on Amazon.

“Reading Sigrid Nunez’s absorbing new novel is somewhat akin to having a long conversation with someone who is telling you something very important, but is telling it in a very quiet voice. You have to really pay attention. Be assured, however, that the experience will be worth it. You will emerge calmer, meditative, more thoughtful, as if you have benefited from an excellent literary massage of sorts.” –The New York Times Book Review

Congratulations Sigrid!

Learn more about Sigrid at her website here or by reading her Issue 10 interview here.

Submissions for Contributor and Intern Updates

Superstition Review is always looking to celebrate the achievements of past contributors and interns, which are featured in our weekly contributor and intern updates posted here on the blog. We now have an easier way for past contributors and interns to reach out to us with news of their literary and academic accomplishments. Updates can be submitted by following a link to Submittable, an online submission form found on the front page of our magazine, or by clicking here.

David Meischen, A Contributor Update

In this week’s contributor update, we are proud to feature the debut of Anyone’s Son, contributor David Meischen’s recently published poetry collection. Anyone’s Son was published in May of 2020 by 3: A Taos Press.

We previously featured David’s short story “In The Garden” in Issue 7 of Superstition Review and he has since authored two guest posts on our blog.

“From the rural South Texas of the nineteen fifties to a desert mesa in New Mexico many years later, Anyone’s Son illuminates the moments of a life animated by the author’s yearning, at its root sexual, for the company of another man. In five sections, each one corresponding to a stage in the life delineated here, the author offers scenes from his childhood on a small farm, as well as moments of conflicted adolescence. He explores unmitigated sexual pleasure, sometimes fraught with anguish and shame. He remembers scenes from marriage and fatherhood, from the wreckage and rebuilding that came at midlife. And finally, glimpses from a second marriage, this time unconflicted, to a man, to the right man. At its heart, Anyone’s Son poses an implicit question: What is identity?”

To read more about David and his work, visit his website here.