“The Evergreen Twig,” A Contributor Update

Slav Nedev’s, “The Evergreen Twig”

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor, Slav Nedev, whose beautiful sculpture, “The Evergreen Twig” was chosen to reside in Rosarium Park, Kazanlak, Bulgaria.

Slav states on his website, “The project was made for a competition,” and went on to explain the minimalistic nature of the piece that he created, and it’s symbolization of “continuous development.”

Congratulations Slav, your sculpture is both beautiful and inspiring.


If you’d like to see more of Slav’s work, you can check out his website.

View Slav’s 5 paintings featured in Issue 20 of Superstition Review here.

Cannibalizing Your Work, An Authors Talk with Lisa Duffy

Lisa Duffy

This week we are excited to feature author of The Salt House, and past Superstition Review contributor, Lisa Duffy on our Authors Talk series.

In Lisa’s talk she discusses her third novel, My Kind of People, the advice she once received to “cannibalize your work,” and what it looks like give your work 9 lives.


You can order Lisa’s novel, My Kind of People, published by Atria Books here.

Check out Lisa’s interview, “Thinking about the Characters” from Issue 21 of Superstition Review.

Intern Update: Bri Perkins

Today’s Intern Update features Bri Perks, the Social Networker in Issue 9 of Superstition Review.

After graduating from ASU, Bri went on to work as a Consultant and Course Assistant at ASU where she helped design courses pertaining to Brain Research and Sensation/Perception.

Currently, Bri works as an Instructional Designer at Springfield College where she designs interactive content for college courses—creating templates, building online courses, and writing instructional guides.

We are so proud of you, Bri!

If you’d like to learn more, you can check out Bri’s LinkedIn here.

3 Reasons Every Writer Should Make A Twitter Account

Social media is a source of entertainment for millions of people, but is there any benefit to it besides that entertainment value? Is it just a mindless way to pass time or is there something else that makes it so popular? I say there is much more to social media than what meets the eye.

Over half of my writer friends refuse to use at least one or more social media platforms and I have never understood why they are so strongly against it. Is it the presumed unprofessionalism or bland commentary? Or is it simply that they never knew what social media could do for them?

One of my favorite platforms is Twitter, and I am a firm believer that having a Twitter account can be beneficial to any writer. Here are 3 reasons why Twitter is such a great resource for writers.

1. Twitter gives you immediate access to what lit mags, journals, and publishers are promoting

If you want to get your work published, Twitter is one of the best places to find the opportunities, contests, and open submissions that get promoted by thousands of journals and publishers. Almost every publication has a Twitter account where they post about their submissions windows and contests immediately and continuously. With Twitter, you no longer have to wait on a newsletter or word of mouth to reach you and force you to frantically pull your submission together before the window closes. You will know as soon as your dream publication opens its submissions, and you’ll have the time to make sure that you send them your best. 

2. Twitter is a great platform to promote yourself and your work

After getting published, one of the main problems writers face is finding people to read their work. Bad book sales can be one of the most disappointing parts of a writing career, but social media platforms like Twitter can help you avoid that. When you get something published, Twitter becomes another way for you to tell people about it, and because Twitter is so massive, you will reach far more people with one Tweet than you would by sending emails or asking people to read what you got published.

3. You get to be part of a fun and supportive international writing community

It is so easy to feel alone when you’re writing. It is often an independent craft, and no matter how many workshops or peer reviews you experience, there will be times when you feel like you are staring down this enormous project all on your own. Whether it’s been a long day and coming back to the page feels like a chore, my revisions aren’t turning out the way I want or anything else, feeling less alone as a writer always makes me feel better, and Twitter is a great reminder that you are not alone. Every time I scroll through my feed, I see hilarious and heartfelt tweets about writing and other writers’ struggles and triumphs. There is a strong writing community on Twitter where we constantly encourage and inspire each other, and I don’t think any writer should miss out on that.

Twitter is more than just fun and games; it’s a unique and effective tool, especially for writers. It has such potential to benefit us, and all we have to do is give it the chance. Happy Tweeting, and most importantly, happy writing!

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Today we are excited to welcome back poet Sarah Carey on our Authors Talk series. In this podcast, Sarah shares some tips for getting “unstuck” in your creative process. She revisits an unfinished poem and walks us through her process of revision with fresh eyes—giving us some incredible insight along the way.

“Don’t give up, explore the hidden…practice self-love, forgiveness, kindness towards yourself and others, and rest.”


You can read Sarah’s poem, “Exotic Taste” in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Want to hear more from Sarah? Follow her on Twitter.


Contributor Update, Kate MacDowell

Porcelain Daemons for His Dark Materials on HBO

A huge congratulations to Superstition Review contributor, Kate MacDowell, whose beautiful hand-crafted works appear in HBO’s new gift set for fans of the show, His Dark Materials.

Kate teamed up with HBO and Big Secret to create these unique sets—complete with different daemons and a delicate laser-cut box.

Congratulations Kate, your works are truly breathtaking.


If you’d like to see more of Kate’s work, you can find her website here.

Want to see Kate’s sculptures, “Skin Changers Closet,” in Issue 15 of Superstition Review? Check them out, here.

ASU Class of 2020 First Destination Survey

Congratulations to ASU’s Class of 2020! We are so proud of what you have accomplished!

If you are an ASU student graduating this May, we encourage you to take ASU’s First Destination Survey. The survey is for undergraduate and graduate students and everyone who completes the survey will be entered in a giveaway for the chance to win a $200 Amazon gift card or an iPad.

The First Destination Survey is used to measure the effectiveness of
Arizona State University in preparing students for success after graduation. It collects a variety of data regarding a student’s post-graduation plans, such as if they have accepted a full-time position, are still looking for an opportunity, or are continuing their education.

Don’t miss out on the chance to win an Amazon gift card or an iPad! Take some time to complete the First Destination Survey today!

Survey link:

https://asu.joinhandshake.com/first_destination_surveys/2587

Survey close date:

October 10, 2020 (Six months after graduation)

Donate to SR for #GivingTuesdayNow



donate

Today, #GivingTuesdayNow is a global effort that asks each of us to support others. If you are in the fortunate position to be able to give today, SR could use your help.

Since 2008 our literary magazine, Superstition Review, has published art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction, and poetry in a beautifully designed online format that is free and open to the public. In twelve years we have published over 1300 international authors and artists, and we have mentored over 350 students. This is a community project that connects students to experts in the fields of art and literature from all over the world.

Your generous donations will provide direct opportunities to students who learn practical skills in the fields of advertising, web design, social media management, content curation, blogging, and marketing.

Your generous donations will go directly to the support of student work on the magazine:

$25 will pay for a website redirect with godaddy.com so that our website is easily accessible across the globe.

$100 will pay for our listing in the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses, which ensures our national reputation and boosts student placement in strong jobs after graduation.

$250 will cover our annual web hosting costs so that our students can learn two content management systems, WordPress and Drupal.

$500 will support student attendance at the Associated Writers and Writing Programs Conference.

Donate today to help us support authors, artists, and students. 

Intern Update: Emily Holloway

Today’s Intern Update features Emily Halloway, the Social Media Manager of Issue #17 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English, Emily currently works as a Copywriter for RevolutionParts Inc. where she has developed 158 Auto brand and model specific SEO pages and works on an ongoing blog project featuring SEO-driven articles.

She is also a self-employed Freelance Writer.

We are so proud of you Emily!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Emily’s LinkedIn here.

Contributor Update, Lisa Duffy


Join us in congratulating Lisa Duffy on her book, My Kind of People, available May 12.

My Kind of People takes place on a small island after ten year old Sky is orphaned for the second time. Each of the islands residents is effected by Sky’s situation and each have their own stories and secrets.

To learn more about Lisa and her work you can visit her website where you can preorder My Kind of People. You can also view an interview on her previous book,

The Salt House, featured in Superstition Review:

Thinking About the Characters featured in Issue 21

Congratulations Lisa!