#ArtLitPhx: Friends of Contemporary Art Film Series

This summer Phoenix Art Museum proudly presents Friends of Contemporary Art Film Series: “Who Are We? The Art of Memory—Fellini’s 8 1/2.” 

Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido Anselmi, a director whose new project is collapsing around him, along with his life. One of the greatest films about film ever made, Federico Fellini’s 8½ (Otto e mezzo) turns one man’s artistic crisis into a grand epic of the cinema. An early working title for was The Beautiful Confusion, and Fellini’s masterpiece is exactly that: a shimmering dream, a circus, and a magic act. 

(dir. Federico Fellini / Italy 1963 / 138 min / Not Rated / B&W / In Italian with English subtitles)  

Free for Circles and FOCA Members, $5 for Members, and $10 for the general public. Not a Member yet? Join today

EVENT INFORMATION

Location: Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave. 

Date: Wednesday, June 26

Time: 6 p.m.

For more information about the event, click here.

#ArtLitPhx: Heidi Ganahl of SheFactor

Join Changing Hands for a talk, Q&A and booksigning with the founder and CEO of the SheFactor.

SheFactor is a book and app that helps young women find their passion, focus on goals, and achieve balance in their personal and professional lives. The book outlines a letter to any woman’s younger self, showing that every path is unique and there is no “right” way to achieve your own form of success. Ganahl doesn’t tell us what to do—she gives a microphone to the inner voice that already knows what to do. The encouragement in the book corresponds to the more tactical accountability that is game-ified in the SheFactor companion app, which readers can use to track each factor in her own life, or locate a mentor or group of friends to help keep her accountable to her new, balanced life goals.

PARKING / LIGHT RAIL

  • Don’t want to drive? Take the Light Rail! It lets off at the Central Avenue/Camelback Park-and-Ride, which has hundreds of free parking spaces across the street from Changing Hands.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
Heidi Ganahl founded Camp Bow Wow, a $100 million leader in the pet and franchise industry, which hit the Inc 500/5000 list five years in a row. Her many accolades include being named one of Fortune Magazine’s Top 10 Most Promising Entrepreneurs and winning the 2016 Brave Leader Award. Heidi was elected to the Board of Regents of the University of Colorado and is founder of the Fight Back Foundation. She enjoys spending time at home with her husband and fellow entrepreneur, Jason, her children, Tori, Hollie, Jack, and Jenna, and her White Labrador, Henry.

EVENT INFORMATION

Location: Changing Hands Bookstore, 300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix 

Date: Friday, June 21

Time: 7 p.m.

For more information about the event, click here.

Contributor Update, Eugene Gloria: ‘Sightseer in this Killing City’

Join us in congratulating SR poetry contributor Eugene Gloria. Eugene’s fourth collection of poems, Sightseer in this Killing City, was recently published by Penguin-Random House.

Gun violence, displacement, cultural legacy, and the bitter divisions in America are just a few of the themes Eugene explores through the voice of his narrator, “who chooses mystery and inhabits landscapes fraught with beauty and brutality.”

“Gloria employs a fastidious agglomeration by, for example, drawing together postmodern Spanish architecture, nineteenth-century French poetry, 1970s English rock, and everlasting Portuguese longing, all in a single poem! . . . A seriously outstanding collection.”

 —Booklist

More information about Eugene and his latest book can be found here. You can also find his poetry from SR’s Issue 3 here.

Congratulations, Eugene!

#ArtLitPhx: Papay Solomon Artist Talk

Join a free in-gallery artist talk with Artist Grant winner Papay Solomon at 6 p.m. on June 19 at the Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave

Papay Solomon’s body of work aims to tell the stories of young refugees through a universal, visual medium. Solomon is active within Arizona’s refugee community, having moved to Phoenix with his family from Africa when he was a teenager. His paintings reject stereotypes and inaccurate depictions of immigrants and refugees in American culture, providing a more truthful, human experience instead. In order to effectively convey personality, emotion, and narrative, Solomon interviews each individual before painting them. His use of hyperrealism and the classical technique of non-finito (not finished) bring attention to the displacement that these individuals may feel and the hyper-sensitivity towards such sentiments. Solomon graduated from Arizona State University with a Bachelor’s in Fine Art. In addition to painting, he is also currently working on a documentary series. 

For more information about this event, click here.

Guest Post, Penny Zang: Dress, Write, Mourn

How to Write About a Dead Woman

“As a rule, think plain, unadorned, gravitas. No cleavage, thigh-high boots, or microminis. No animal prints and certainly no cowboy fringe.”

— Nina Garcia’s Look Book: What to Wear for Every Occasion, “What to Wear to a Funeral”

Between January 1, 2016 and mid-February 2018, five people I loved died: my best friend, two aunts, my grandmother, and my father. I started writing “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” shortly after the last two deaths, when I was unable to stop myself from dreaming about dead women. It was always the women. Women watching me while I slept, women waiting for me to catch up.

I never questioned the dreams or what was happening on the page. Writing about dead women seemed to be the natural result of not taking off work, not talking about my grief, and not stopping the day-to-day “grind” of grading essays, folding laundry, and hosting birthday parties for a house full of five-year olds. 

“How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” was/is part of a longer work-in-progress. The individual sections, though, were born from the blend of influences that seeped into my brain during each of those mind-numbing, grief-filled days.

In no particular order: Sylvia Plath, Selena, Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties, Peaches ‘N Cream Barbie, Lincoln in the Bardo, what to wear to a funeral, how long it takes to grieve, Ouija boards, Bloody Mary, Twin Peaks, Linkin Park, George Michael, Amy Winehouse, The Cranberries, cremation, novel after novel after TV show after movie with a dead woman in the middle of the plot. The question of what happens to your best stories and your worst secrets if you’re the only one left alive to remember?

In his essay, “On Becoming an American Writer,” Alexander Chee says, “Speak to your dead. Write for your dead. Tell them a story. What are you doing with this life? Let them hold you accountable.” 

Is that what I was trying to do as I wrote in the aftermath of my grief? Did I intend to speak to my dead? On some level, yes. Each time I dream about my friend, always her more than the others, I wake up wondering what she wants me to do now. What stories does she want me to write? What secrets am I allowed to share? 

I wrote “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” with her in mind, her at age 35 and age 28 and age 22 and age 12. I saw her passing me a note in 8thgrade English and escorting me to junior prom and holding back my hair when we lived together years later. I saw her holding my son. I saw us shopping and sharing and stealing each other’s clothes. How intimate it all seems now, in retrospect, that I don’t have anyone who wants to borrow my favorite dress. 

The dress, I think, was always part of the story, even before I started writing. As I packed my funeral dress for my friend’s memorial service, I might have thought about the perfect symbolism of a black dress and how I would one day write about my loss. I had a feeling more funerals were coming (though I didn’t know how many or how quickly), and if I had thought about writing through my grief, I would have also known how central a dress would be to that narrative.  

Otherwise, I don’t remember writing a single word. 

One of the benefits of writing at 5 a.m. is that no one cares what I’m wearing. Inside-out T-shirts tops and ratty robes are my uniform. It doesn’t matter if I’m blurry, stumbling, and unable to form complete thoughts yet. There’s coffee, and a cat to keep me company. There’s a (hopefully) charged laptop. The sky is just the right kind of dark. 

This is how I write, with my subconscious still buzzing from half-baked dreams, and a complete lack of censorship. The internal editor is still asleep and the lack of perfection, the full-on embrace of imperfection, becomes the fuel for my creative process. A quiet house at 5 a.m. is pure luxury. Better than Burberry trench coats and Missoni knits and Frye harness boots, and whatever else Nina Garcia says I am supposed to own and enjoy.

After I wrote “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive,” my Twitter friend, Steve Bargdill, told me about keening. Keening is a death wail, a public lament that has now grown out of fashion, giving women a voice for their grief. Sometimes professional mourners were hired to grieve publically at funerals. I am simplifying, of course, but the blend of beauty and tragedy struck a nerve. Yes, I thought. That is what it feels like to ache and not have the words, or to not need the words, to express it. 

This is not to suggest that writing “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” was a healing experience. Not at all. I like how T Kira Madden addresses the issue of writing and healing in her essay “Against Catharsis: Writing is Not Therapy.” She writes, “But to render the art, to render the experience, does not, in my practice, involve ‘bleeding into the typewriter.’ It does not entail a writer spilling or spewing the memory onto a blank page, nailing it down, healing.” I don’t disagree.

Lately, my writing and my mourning are mashed together so brutally, I couldn’t ever call the creative process therapeutic. Instead, it feels like I am crafting a eulogy that no one has asked me to write. Over and over, it feels like standing in front of my family and friends, pretending like I have all the right words instead of one long, imperfect wail.  

#ArtLitPhx: Scene-Setting with Writer Betty Webb

Attend a workshop from current Library Writer-in-Residence mystery author Betty Webb to learn new skills in the craft of writing and publishing. All experience levels are welcome.

The Writers-in-Residence program promotes writing in communities by connecting local, professional authors to serve as Writers-in-Residence at local libraries. Writers-in-Residence spend time at the library during their residency composing new works and providing education for community members. 

2019 Writer-in-Residence: Betty Webb, May–July 2019

Betty Webb is the author of the nationally best-selling Lena Jones mystery series (Desert Vengeance, Desert Rage, Desert Wives, Desert Noir, Desert Wind, etc.) and the humorous Gunn Zoo mysteries (The Otter of Death, The Llama of Death, The Puffin of Death, etc.). Before beginning to write full time, Betty worked as a journalist, interviewing everyone from U.S. presidents, astronauts who walked on the moon, Nobel Prize-winners, and polygamy runaways. She has taught creative writing classes and workshops at Arizona State University and Phoenix College, has been a nationally-syndicated literary critic for 30 years, and is currently reviewing for Mystery Scene Magazine. In addition to other organizations, Betty is a member of the National Federation of Press Women, Mystery Writers of America, and Sisters in Crime.

EVENT INFORMATION

Location: Tempe Public Library’s BRiC Training Room, 3500 S. Rural Rd.

Date: June 15

Time: 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Ages: 18+

To read more about this event, click here.

#ArtLitPhx: ‘Sweating It’ Storyline Slam

Stop by The Newton for a storytelling competition.

10 STORYTELLERS. 6 MINUTES. 1 WINNER.

The Storytellers: Each month, 10 storytellers take the stage to share a six-minute story. To put your name in the Electronic Hat, sign up to be a teller on the front page of this website starting the day after the last SLAM. The SLAM lineup is posted the weekend before the show on this website and on the SLAM’s Facebook event page.

The Judges: Audience members are picked at random the night of the show before the SLAM starts to be the judges.  

The SLAM: Five judges score the stories on a scale of ten, with the total maximum points available set at 30. The highest and lowest scores from the judges will be dropped. The remaining scores are tallied to compile the storyteller’s final score.

The Winner: The storyteller with the most points at the end of the night wins $30!

Scoring at The Storyline Slam

Founded in 2011 by Dan Hoen Hull, The Storyline is a series of live storytelling nights that create a space for diverse stories without checking boxes. Several storytelling shows have sprung from their origins within The Storyline Collective including …And Then It Got Weird, Yarnball and The Whole Story. The Storyline Slam continues in that tradition as a monthly slam competition, aimed to further storytelling in The Valley and foster a spirit of fun in the community.

EVENT INFORMATION

Location: The Newton, 300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix

Date: Friday, June 14

Time: 7 to 9 p.m.

Tickets: $6 online or $8 at the door

For more information about the event, click here.

Contributor Update, Brenda Hillman: Broadside Reading Series

Join us in congratulating SR poet contributor Brenda Hillman. Now the author of ten poetry collections published by Wesleyan University Press, she was chosen as a featured author in the Broadside Reading Series, which took place on May 30 at the New York Center For Book Arts Inc.

Her most recent collection, Extra Hidden Life, among the Days, was published last year and contains poetry of grief and sustenance.

To read more about Brenda and her publications, click here. You can find her poem, “To a Desert Poet,” from Issue 3 here.

Congratulations on this exciting news, Brenda!

#ArtLitPhx: Draw-A-Thon

Participate in an indoor festival celebrating the arts and sciences of drawing on June 22 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Pkwy.

Family Focus: 10 a.m.–2 p.m.
Booths include exhibiting artists Brandi Lee Cooper, Emily Ritter, Abbey Messmer and Maria Salenger and organizations including Crayola Experience Chandler, Edna Vihel Arts Center, Tempe History Museum and Xico Inc. Activities include printmaking, Suminagashi floating ink painting, topography map drawing and a fantasy station dedicated to dinosaurs and unicorns.

Teen Focus: 2–6 p.m.
Booths include exhibiting artists Jerry Jacobson and Justin Rodier and organizations including Architekton, ASU School of Art, Tempe Public Art, Scottsdale Artists School and FABRIC of Tempe. Activities include virtual reality drawing, portfolio reviews, animation, costume design, fashion design and open studio sessions with a live model and artist Matt Dickson.

Adult Focus (with live music and happy hour): 6–10 p.m.
Booths include exhibiting artist Laura Spalding Best and date night activities including competitive drawing games, fashion show by FABRIC designers and open studio sessions with live model and artist Matt Dickson.

For a complete Draw-A-Thon schedule, click here.


Summer Parking: Enjoy free cart rides from your vehicle to the Tempe Center for the Arts’ front door! Due to construction, the parking lot is located at Hardy Dr. and Rio Salado Pkwy. Just follow the signs.

#ArtLitPhx: Moments of Color

Royse Contemporary is proud to present Moments of Color, a group exhibition examining artists’ use of color and the effects color creates on both the artist and viewer. This exhibition showcases the work of six noteworthy artists including Cherie Buck-Hutchison, Nigel Clouse, Charmagne Coe, Gennaro Garcia, Daniel Shepherd, and Onna Voellmer.

This exhibition offers an eclectic selection of work with artists working in an array of mediums including painting, drawing, photography and mixed media.

“I am delighted to bring this enchanting collection of work to Royse Contemporary, featuring artists whose work offers a vibrancy, distinctive voice and vitality that captivates viewers.”

Owner/Curator Nicole Royse


Moments of Color will open to the public Thursday, June 13, 2019, from 6 to 9 p.m., coinciding with the weekly Scottsdale ArtWalk. This special artist reception will feature a wonderful evening of art, the opportunity to meet the artists and curator, along with light hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. Moments of Color will be on display at Royse Contemporary from June 13 through July 21, 2019.

Royse Contemporary is located at 7077 E. Main St., Suite 6, Scottsdale. Royse Contemporary summer hours are Thursday 6 to 9 p.m., Saturday noon to 5 p.m. and is available by appointment. For more information about Royse Contemporary, our featured artists or available artwork visit roysecontemporary.com