Authors Talk: Sarah Viren

Authors Talk: Sarah Viren

Today we are pleased to feature an interview with Sarah Viren. Sarah is a journalist, writer, and translator working at Arizona State University specializing in the art of the creative nonfiction essay. She is the author of an essay collection entitled MINE.

In this fascinating interview she discusses her experience with writing from her working in journalism to her transition to writing literary essays. During her time as a journalist, she found that she wanted to write about things that “had no place in newspapers” and essay writing provided a new solution. The literary essay presents its own problems as the author is dealing with real people and Sarah explains how she has learned to write ethically about close loved ones from her sister to her children. Literary essays allow the author to “find ways to let those people have their voice be heard” while also showcasing the uniqueness of their own.

Sarah also takes time to explain her writing process from inspiration to research and observation identifying herself as a fan of the idea of “writing something and giving it time.” She uses moments of inspiration and wants to write honestly about herself and others, to share meaningful stories. In memory writing she says “remembering the self I was” can be hard and that in writing of others it is the “people that are outside of our sympathies… those are the people you need to write about.” Her essays are dark and honest and real, and though they are at times difficult to write she remembers “it’s hard work, but good work.”

This interview is a culmination of immersive student work on non-fiction narratives for ENG 509 in the Narrative Studies program in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts. In this class, students read longform non-fiction writing and listened to author interviews to theorize writerly practices related to a variety of non-fiction genres. Students’ final reading for the course was Sarah Viren’s essay collection Mine. After a semester of critically engaging with author interviews, they composed their own questions and interviewed Dr. Viren on Tuesday, November 19. Watch the full interview to learn more about her creative process and inspiration and be inspired yourselves by the reflections and advice of a fellow creative mind.

Sarah Viren is a writer, journalist, and literary translator. Her essay collection, Mine, won the River Teeth Book Prize, was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, and was longlisted for the Pen/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Her translation of the novella Córdoba Skies by the Argentine author Federico Falco was published in 2016 by Ploughshares Solos, and her co-edited anthology of the essay in the Americas, The Great American Essay, is forthcoming from Mad Creek Books. An award-winning newspaper journalist for half a decade in Texas and Florida, Sarah holds an MFA from the University of Iowa and is now an assistant professor at Arizona State University.

Michelle Stuckey is a clinical assistant professor and the writing program administrator for the Writers’ Studio, a fully online first-year composition program in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts. Stuckey is an interdisciplinary scholar whose research and teaching are informed by feminist and critical race theories. 

Kendall Dawson is a current Narrative Studies Master’s student at Arizona State University. She holds a Bachelor’s in Communication and English Literature from Central Michigan University, enjoys reading, and loves her hometown of Chicago, IL.  

Delena Humble is a first year graduate student in the narrative Studies MA program at Arizona State University. At ASU, she also serves as the primary research assistant to New York Times best selling author, Jewell Parker-Rhodes. Delena’s passions include writing and studying Latinx identity negotiation, ethical story representation, and autoethnography. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her two cats. 

Riley Hess is a second-year graduate student in the Communication Studies Master’s program at ASU’s West Campus. He is working on a short memoir about his trials and tribulations as a student-athlete in high school and college, as well as an applied project using persuasion theory to effectively fill out a general grant application form for nonprofit organizations.

Monique Medina is a second year graduate student. She is in the beginning stages of her Capstone project, which will focus on the relationships between parents and their trans children. This topic hits close to home as she has a trans nonbinary child and it’s been a journey in rediscovering who my child is, while building upon and redefining our relationship.

H. Rae Monk

H. Rae Monk is a graduate student in the Narrative Studies Master of Arts program. She is currently doing grant funded public history research in the rural towns of eastern Arizona and western New Mexico. She resides and works in Mesa.  

Contributor Update, Kirsten Voris

Past SR contributor Kirsten Voris has recently taken part in the creation of the Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Deck for Kids along with Brooklyn Alvarez and David Emerson.

The 50-card deck and the informative booklet are meant for caregivers, therapists, and teachers as a way to encourage agency and embodiment in children who have experienced trauma. The unique yoga deck is perfect for every kind of instruction and specifically informed to help people, offering games and activities to use yoga as a way to heal.

You can buy this yoga deck from the publisher’s website. Read Kirsten’s work featured in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Guest Post, Emma DePanise: Poeming the Poetry Book

Guest Post, Emma DePanise: Poeming the Poetry Book

Recently, while chatting with an author about their book of poems, I asked them about the ordering of their collection. I was particularly curious about the placing of a few poems about half-way through the book that focused on personal experience.

Reading these personal poems in the context of the prior poems, which were primarily concerned with the world outside the self, was incredibly striking. The author responded by first noting that he is always unsure how people will engage his books—whether they will pick up the book and read one or two poems and set it down, or if they will read the book in larger chunks or even in one sitting.

Poems are individual units of possibility. They enchant us and surprise us. We delight in their layers upon layers of meaning. But poems do not only contain layers of meaning—they contain layers of experiencing.

We can experience a poem through its visual appearance on the page, through its sounds and rhythms, through the way it feels leaving our mouths. We feel and come to understand all at once the tensions and releases found in reading both lines and sentences and seeing a poem as well as hearing it. These multiplicities are at the core of the lyric poem—they allow us to engage with the poem in a present moment and to return to its music often.

While we can experience the many facets of a poem all at once, often to gain a deeper understanding of the poem or an understanding of the ways in which the poem is crafted, we must isolate its particular components—such as solely examining a poem’s use of sound or whitespace. We often engage a poem not only in multiple readings, but in different readings.

I think this concept of engaging in multiple and different readings can apply to the poetry book. I also like the idea of applying some of Jonathan Culler’s Theory of the Lyric to poetry books. These books are rather different from other books we often read, such as novels. A poem within a poetry book is self-sufficient, yet is always altered by its existence within the larger text. And the text, the whole, exists as its own entity that at the same time cannot exist without the individual poems in their particular form and order. And in addition to the poem, there are other units within the poetry book that create complexity, such as series of poems and larger sections.

The complex dynamic between parts and wholes allows some poetry books to function much like poems. Through reading a poetry book, the reader is creating a web of connections and tensions that can be experienced in a present moment. This ‘web’ separates narrative forms, like the novel, from other forms, like the poetry book, which can be much more lyric.

While we can read narrative forms like the novel from beginning to end, we often read poetry books circularly—constantly referring to previous poems and ideas to consider the relationships between the many parts and wholes. When reading the last poem in a collection, we often return to prior poems in thought—the context of experiencing the whole changes the parts we have already experienced. We are continuously re-experiencing units of the poetry book in a ritualistic way, similarly to how we return to reconsider lines or stanzas or the title of a poem after reaching its end.

Just as there are multiple ways of reading a poem to yield new understandings or experiences, there are multiple ways of reading a poetry book. Sometimes, when poems expect a lot of us as readers, we must absorb them in smaller chunks. Other times, we may be able to read a collection straight through. After reading a poetry book in smaller chunks, we might consider re- reading it continuously. I think a continuous reading sensitizes us to the ebb and flow of a poetry book—to the various turns or climaxes within series or sections or the larger whole.

We can have a different experience through reading the last poem of a book back into the first poem. We could also isolate poems written about a particular subject or in a particular form and read them continuously rather than reading them in the order they appear within the collection. We could read a poem specifically in the context of another poem within the collection. These different readings will illuminate new aspects of both the poems and the book, providing us a way to experience the complexities of the poetry book as a form.

I am not advocating for a particular way we should be reading poetry books, but rather that many readings exist as possibilities for us to explore. Just as we delight in whole poems as well as in their lines, stanzas, sounds and rhythms, we can delight in whole books as well as in their individual poems, series and sections. We not only delight in these parts, but in the various tensions and connections present—the spaces that exist between these parts and their larger wholes. Regardless of how we read a poetry book, we should consider more often these spaces between—the wondrous web of meanings and experiences that draws us to encounter a poetry book again and again.

Intern Update: Natalie Volin

Today’s Intern Update features Natalie Volin, a Content Coordinator from Issue 17 of Superstition Review.

With a BS in Technical Communication as well as a minor in Spanish and a certificate in publishing, Natalie was recently promoted to be an Operations Manager at the Baby Bathwater Institute, a network of entrepreneurs.

Natalie was also a co-founder of the Iron City magazine, an online and print journal that publishes work from incarcerated writers and artists to highlight and find value in their stories to pave the way for understanding and transformation.

We are so proud of you Natalie!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Natalie’s LinkedIn profile here.

Just An Ordinary Woman Breathing

Contributor Update, Julie Marie Wade

Join us in congratulating past SR nonfiction contributor Julie Marie Wade on the upcoming publication of her newest book, Just An Ordinary Woman Breathing. It will be available from The Ohio State University Press in February of 2020.

The collection of essays deals with her own coming of age as she delves into the idea of history and the body in the contemporary world. This will be her eleventh book.

To learn more about Julie and her work you can visit her website. You can also read her creative essay featured in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Congratulations Julie!

Intern Update: Emily Holloway

Today’s Intern Update features Emily Holloway, an intern who worked on Superstition Review’s Pinterest and Tumblr during Issue 17’s run.

With a BA in English, Emily has been working as a copywriter for RevolutionParts Inc. since last year. There, she works with the in-house marketing team to produce content and copy for company’s personal use as needed: case studies, e-Books, blog posts, articles, infographics, etc. in the hopes to generate leads.

Emily has also worked as a Web Content Writer for United Fray, a Phoenix lifestyle blog, and as an editor for Rinky Dink Press, an independent microzine that specializes in publishing collections of micro poetry (45 words or less).

We are so proud of you Emily!

If you’d like, you can learn more by visiting Emily’s LinkedIn here.

Intern Update: Jessica Fletcher

Today’s Intern Update features Jessica Fletcher, the Student Editor-in-Chief of Issue 17 of Superstition Review.

With BAs in both English and Psychology as well as a minor in Family and Human Development and even an MA in Mental Health Counseling, Jessica has been working as a Clinical Therapist for Bayless Integrated Healthcare since last year. There, she provides mental health counseling for all ages in community and integrated healthcare settings.

Jessica has also worked as an MC intern for the City of Tempe Counseling Services, providing individual and couples counseling for all sorts of people, from children to adolescents to adults.

We are so proud of you Jessica!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Jessica’s LinkedIn profile here.

Contributor Update, Sarah Vap

Join us in congratulating past SR poetry contributor, Sarah Vap, on the recent publication of her newest book, Winter: Effulgences and Devotions, a work of literary nonfiction.

Within the book, Sarah contemplates her work on a single poem over a twelve year period and the obstacles she faced on the creative journey. As the author of seven books, she is an experienced, award-winning writer.

Winter vap

To learn more about Sarah and her work you can visit her website. You can also read an interview with her, featured in Issue 13 of Superstition Review.

Congratulations, Sarah!

Intern Update: Shelby Kazen

Today’s Intern Update features Shelby Kazen, an advertiser from Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English, Shelby recently began working as a Video Collaboration Specialist at Logitech, a multi-brand company designing products that bring people together through music, gaming, video and computing. Their mission is to continually enhance how customers connect and interact with the digital world.

Shelby also worked as the Director of Marketing for the Atlas Artist Group, where she collaborated with musicians to develop advertising strategies best suited for their overall goals. These could include driving traffic to streaming platforms or ticketing sites, or increasing views on music videos.

We are so proud of you Shelby!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Shelby’s LinkedIn profile here.

Intern Update: Leslie Standridge

Today’s Intern Update features Leslie Standridge, a Blogger from Issue 16 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English Literature as well as Film and Media Studies, Leslie began working as a publicist at Lavidge earlier this year. There, she is part of a marketing company that specializes in advertising, public relations, and digital marketing.

Leslie has also worked as a publicist for SparkPoint Studio, where she spearheaded national and local publicity campaigns for authors and
pitched and secured media in national, local, and niche publications.

We are so proud of you Leslie!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Leslie’s LinkedIn here.