Contributor Update, Laurie Stone

Join us in congratulating past SR contributor, Laurie Stone, on the publication of her new book Everything is Personal, Notes on Now.

The memoir is an amalgamation of essays and diary entries about her life experience as she contemplates the world. The introduction writer of the book Chris Kraus called it “engaging, sharp, [and] funny.”

Her book will be released on January 15, 2020 and is now available for pre-order here. To learn more about Laurie and her work, visit her website. You can also read her essays featured in Issue 1 and Issue 10 of Superstition Review.

Congratulations, Laurie!

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Guest Post, Ace Boggess: Time-Voice

During a recent literary festival at a nearby college, the usual discussion about finding one’s voice came up. All the familiar suggestions were made: figuring out a preferred medium, discovering whether to write chronologically or in segments, writing what you know versus following the elements of a story (Plato versus Aristotle, as I like to think of it), and so on. When my turn came to speak, I realized I had been giving the same advice for years but never written it down: experiment with writing at different times of day.

The human brain is a trickster god, and its greatest gag is its way of shifting its own perspective as the hours pass between waking and rest. A writer might have different voices during those different hours—a time-voice, say, or time-voices. By working at different times, a writer can figure out whether words come best at dawn or dusk, noon or 2 a.m.

That isn’t to say that any writing time isn’t valid, but that the author might have several different time-voices, as I do. Mastering them can help with creating the true big-V Voice.

Here’s how it works for me:

1) In the morning, my mind is blank. I often have no idea what will come out of my head when I start to write. The ideas come as simple epiphanies and build inside me, spilling out in an almost stream-of-consciousness style. These microbursts are often quite lovely and have their own momentum. As such, I’ve found that, for me, mornings are best spent writing poetry.

2) At night, my head is full. The day has worn on me. My anxieties have flared and exploded so many times that I wonder how I’ve survived. Throughout the day, I’ve observed, feared, been awed, and felt anger, desire, embarrassment, and dread. I’ve contemplated angles. I’ve lived and experienced everything from monotony to chaos. This is every day for me, and as night comes, my thoughts swirl around, waiting to be focused. At nighttime, therefore, I’m better equipped to take on short stories. I have to lasso these images and ideas, then herd them together. At that point, stories grow from the energetic hodgepodge of my thoughts.

3) In the afternoon, it’s easier for me to establish a routine. My head is full enough to know what I want to say, but empty enough that the process of saying it and figuring out what comes next is still interesting to me. The afternoons are often the best time for me to attempt longer works. In the past, these have been my novel-writing hours.

I know these things about myself and have been able to use them effectively in my writing. That’s not to suggest that writing at the same hours will lead to the same results for anyone else. I am saying only that there is value in testing different time-voices. My advice is the same as it would be when determining whether to write with a notebook, laptop, or voice recorder: try them all and figure out what works best for you.

Intern Update: Sydni Budelier

Today’s Intern Update features Sydni Budelier, a blogger for Issue 11 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English/Creative Writing, Sydni has been working as the Director of Communications at Hope for the Day, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing suicide through outreach, education, and action.

Sydni has also worked as a print editorial intern for Nylon Magazine, where she was even featured as a contributing writer in the May 2015 print issue for film review on Far From the Madding Crowd.

We are so proud of you Sydni!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Sydni’s LinkedIn here.

Intern Update: Monica Petersen

Today’s Intern Update features Monica Petersen, an Interview Editor of Issue 11 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English Literature and a BS in Finance, Monica recently started working as an Assistant Director for the ASU Foundation for A New American University, coordinating scholarship applications and leading the university-wide scholarship administration council.

Monica has also worked as an editorial intern for HarperCollins Publishers, editing manuscripts and running a blog to further engage with audiences.

We are so proud of you Monica!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Monica’s LinkedIn page here.

Contributor Update: Thomas Legendre

Join us in congratulating author and past SR contributor, Thomas Legendre! His newest novel Keeping Time is set to be released from University of Cincinnati Press on March 15, 2020. The book centers around Aaron Keeler and his time-traveling journey where he meets a younger version of his wife. During his travels, Aaron must face the challenges of his marriage, save his family and deal with the ancient mystery that launched his career. The book is inspired by his shorter fictional piece “Ultraviolet” which was published in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Thomas is also the author of a novel entitled The Burning, various critical and creative essays, and a few dramatic writing pieces. In his everyday life he works as a professor at the University of Nottingham.

To learn more about Thomas and his writing, visit his website and find more information about Keeping Time here.

Congratulations, Thomas!

Intern Update: Christine Truong

Today’s intern update features, Christine Truong, an art editor from Issue 9 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English Language and Literature, Christine has recently begun work as a college counselor for Fulfillment Fund, which aims to help people attend college who otherwise couldn’t for financial or other reasons by giving them a support network.

She has also worked as an academic leader in A Place Called Home, an organization dedicated to supporting young people in economically hard times by offering programs for tutoring, counseling, nutrition, and many other helpful resources.

We are so proud of you Christine!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Christine’s LinkedIn page here.

Intern Update: Sarah Murray

Today’s Intern Update features Sarah Murray, who worked as a fiction editor on Issue 9 of Superstition Review.

With both a BA and MA in Creative Writing as well as involvement in various communities from HEAL International to the LGBTQ Coalition, Sarah has been directing the AIDS Walk in Los Angeles for the past year, promoting the event and overseeing its execution to help combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

She also works as a Digital Operations Editor for Fairy Tale Review, co-managing communications and outreach in addition to supervising the submission-to-publication process.

We are so proud of you Sarah!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Sarah’s LinkedIn page here.

Intern Update: Tana Ingram

Today’s Intern Update features Tana Ingram, who worked as a fiction editor on Issue 8 of Superstition Review.

Not only does she have a BA in Literature, Writing, and Film as well as a BS in Human Nutrition, she also has MS in Nutrition. For the past year she has worked at Mountain Park Health Center as a registered dietician, supporting health however she can.

She also worked as a Clinical Dietician at Dignity Health before transferring right here in Tempe, continuing her efforts in preventative nutrition care for her patients.

We are so proud of you Tana!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Tana’s LinkedIn page here and her MPHC page here.

Contributor Update, Jami Attenburg

Join us in congratulating past SR interview contributor Jami Attenburg on the upcoming publication of her newest novel All This Could Be Yours! The book tells the beautifully woven story of a dysfunctional family, centering around a woman who starts to uncover the troubling past of her father who is on his death bed.

Jami is a critically acclaimed, internationally published author and this will be her seventh book! She has also written for many notable publications such as The New York Times Magazine and The Guardian. All This Could Be Yours will be released on October 22! Check out her interview with Superstition Review in Issue 20 and visit her website for information about her and her work.

Congratulations, Jami!