Authors Talk: Ephraim Scott Sommers

Today we are pleased to feature poet Ephraim Scott Sommers as our Authors Talk series contributor. In this brief interview, Ephraim discusses his life as a poet and as a singer/songwriter, and how each endeavor creatively informs the other.

While Ephraim grew up in a musical household, he said that he “didn’t really think about being in a band until I turned 18,” when he formed the group known as Siko with other musically inclined friends. He admits that he originally “was way far behind in his musicianship”, but that through years of dedication and hard work, he was able to “create something…from nothing” and craft many memorable experiences.

Speaking on the interrelationship of poetry and music, Ephraim states that “he came to lyricism and to poetry writing through music.” He elaborates that “what really drew me to poetry at first was the sound of words,” and that this inspired him to “try to tell stories in a musical way” through his pieces. In light of this, he expresses his interest in the lyric tradition of people like Dante and Virgil, who are “singing you a story” through their poetic work.

You can read another interview with Ephraim, “The Funeral Pyre of Poetry,” in Issue 19 of Superstition Review.

Intern Update, H. Rae Monk: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at ASU

H. Rae MonkToday we are proud to announce that past fiction editor, H. Rae Monk, won an Osher Lifelong Learning Institute scholarship. Rae is a student in the new MA in Narrative Studies at Arizona State University, and past fiction editor for Superstition Review’s Issue 19. She is currently working on a project with the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, which will enable OLLI students to connect with traditional ASU students through shared narratives. The project will encourage students to share true stories about their lives with classmates in order to strengthen empathy and open communication across generational divides

Way to go, Rae!

Contributor Update: Adrian C. Louis

Adrian C. LouisIt is with a heavy heart that we here at Superstition Review would like to remember Adrian C. Louis, who passed away September 11, 2018. Louis was a two time contributor with us and we’d like to express our most heartfelt condolences to his loved ones. It was an honor to read and share his remarkable work. Here is Louis’ poem “Brother Bear,” which was published in our first issue.

Brother Bear by Adrian C. Louis

 

 

Contributor Update, Maggie Kast: “The House Will Burn” in The Orison Anthology

Maggie KastWe are pleased to announce that past contributor Maggie Kast’s essay, “The House Will Burn,” has been accepted for reprint in The Orison Anthology vol. 3, 2018. The volume is available for purchase at Orison Books. Congratulations, Maggie!

The House Will Burn” is also available to read in Issue 19 of Superstition Review.

Authors Talk: Jenny Day

Authors TalkToday we are pleased to feature artist Jenny Day as our Authors Talk series contributor. In this short interview, Day talks about her five art pieces from her “Nearly Somewhere” series and “Forgotten Topographies” series featured in Issue 19. Day expands on her own artistic background, influences, goals, and the places and memories that inspired her art pieces.

Jenny Day’s five art pieces appear in Issue 19 of Superstition Review.

Authors Talk: Mary Morris

Mary MorrisToday we are pleased to feature poet Mary Morris as our Authors Talk series contributor. Mary discusses her writing process involving the current manuscript she is working on, which relates to her ninety-five year-old mother, and reads her poem, “Deduction.”

“Crone” and “Deduction” by Mary Morris can be read on Issue 19 of Superstition Review here

If you want to know more about poet Mary Morris you can visit her website or LinkedIn.

Authors Talk: Kate Lechler

Kate LechlerToday we are pleased to feature Kate Lechler as our Authors Talk series contributor. Kate discusses her essay, “The Breathtaking Sting of the Pull,” and what non-fiction offers to her as a writer.

She reflects on her time as an ESL teacher in the suburbs of Seoul, South Korea, and finds that most of the stories she writes are the last stories she’d think of sharing. She identifies religion as a recurring theme in most of her work, including the novel she is currently writing, in which her protagonist, like herself, grew up conservative Christian. Finally, Kate ends her podcast by talking about the strength of fiction and how, “we can create a world where we can think about all the things we care about.”

Kate Lechler’s essay, “The Breathtaking Sting of the Pull,” can be read in Issue 19 of Superstition Review.

Contributor Update: Maria Martin Narrative 30 Below Winner

Maria MartinToday we are happy to congratulate Maria Martin on receiving second place in the 30 Below Contest by Narrative. “Five” and two other poems by Maria are available to read from Narrative’s Winter 2018 Issue.

Maria is a poetry contributor for Superstition Review Issue 19. If you have not yet had the chance to read through her four poems now is a great opportunity.

We also had the pleasure of featuring Maria in our Authors Talk series in January. To hear her discussion on the evolution of her work please visit Authors Talk: Maria Martin here on the blog.

Congratulations, Maria!

Contributor Update: Rose Knapp Metempoïesis Poetry Collection

Metempoiesis by Rose KnappWe are excited to announce that past Superstition Review  contributor, Rose Knapp, has a new poetry collection available. Metempoïesis was released at the end of January and can be purchased through Dostoyevsky Wannabe.

Rose was featured in Issue 19. Her three poems are accompanied with sound and can be read, and heard, here. Rose also contributed to the Superstition Review Blog via an Authors Talk. Here she discusses about her poetry, language, and translation.

Congratulations, Rose!