Contributor Update, Cameron Barnett

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor and Carol Brown Award-winning poet Cameron Barnett for being featured in the Poetry Society of America‘s poetry series, “Saying his Name.” The series is curated by Terrance Hayes and focuses on how the story of Emmett Till’s murder in the 1950s has influenced a new generation of black poets. Emmett Till was just a child at the time of his lynching and his story is still intimately tied to many people’s perceptions of what it means to be a young black boy in America. Cameron’s poem is titled “Emmett Till Haunts the Library in Money, MS” and touches on the invisibility with which black boys learn to navigate the world, a poignant and bitter dissection of the way black authors have been tucked aside and forgotten over the years. Check out the poem for yourself here.

Be sure to take a look at Cameron’s website here and his poems featured in Issue 22 here.

Humanities Dialogues Event

Join ASU’s College of Integrative Sciences and Arts at the Polytechnic campus for the yearly Humanities Dialogues! Each dialogue features two scholars who share recent research or work-in-progress and invite discussion. The first event took place on September 24th, but there are still two events to come, including one on October 21st and one on November 17th. Upcoming topics for these talks include embracing Irish identity, transnational feminism, and using your body to learn linguistic ideologies!

Contact Professor Ian Moulton at his email, Ian.Moulton@asu.edu, with any questions or concerns. Click the link here to access the Zoom Room where the events will take place. Be sure to check out what the ASU website has to say about the event as well. See what else the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts is planning for Fall 2o20 here.

7th Annual Hacks for Humanity: Hacking for The Social Good

Join Project Humanities at ASU for a three-day virtual event for for designers, hackers, and entrepreneurs searching for solutions to some of society’s biggest issues. The three main themes of this year’s event are aging, safety, and justice. The event is an opportunity for ASU students, faculty, and staff to get together to innovate, create, network, and collaborate. Hacks for Humanity: Hacking for The Social Good will take place online this year Friday – Sunday October 9th-11th. At the end of the event, three top innovative teams will be picked as winners and $10,000 worth of cash prizes will be awarded. We can’t wait to see you there!

Find out more about Hacks for Humanity: Hacking for the Social Good here and register for the event here.

Contributor Update, Thomas Gresham

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Thomas “Tex” Gresham on the release of his experimental collection, Heck, Texas. Tex is a screenwriter and fiction author and is currently studying screenwriting at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. The book is a play on the stereotypical disreputable Texas town and lies somewhere between the real and imaginary. The book was released on September 4th and is available at Barnes&Noble, Bookshop, and Amazon.

The back of Heck, Texas reads: “Somewhere deep in East Texas, the hunt is on, fueled by self-hate, cough syrup, white whales, massive zits, freakshows, madness, dead pets, lost children, killer coffee, rats, Satan, good times, bad people, vomit, dementia, diarrhea, sex, and clowns. Your favorite brand of disease is back in stock. Welcome to Heck, Texas.”

Congratulations, Tex!

Stay up-to-date with Tex by visiting his website here or his Twitter here. Be sure to also take a look at his short story for Issue 21 here.

Contributor Update, Patricia Clark

We are excited to announce past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Patricia Clark is releasing a new book of poems titled Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars. Patricia Clark has been featured in the poetry sections of Issues 7, 8, and 17 of Superstition Review. Her latest book will release October 14th, but is available for pre-order at Amazon or Barnes&Noble. Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars is the sixth volume of poetry Patricia has written and focuses on the world as she sees it, through the attentive lens of an imaginative author with a keen eye for detail. The book ranges a wide variety of topics and places and will take the reader on a journey through space and emotion.

Patricia Clark’s Self-Portrait with a Million Dollars is full of her usual wide-ranging brilliance and sly wit. It’s a monk’s travelogue, a scholar’s giddy after-party. Exquisitely rendered, these poems, for all their beauty and mastery of tone and rhythm, their sprezzatura, are at once delicate and durable, by turns landmarks, monuments, and tombstones-each a fresh testament to that most marvelous of human traits, our limitless human capacity for invention, and the necessity of witness. Whoever, wherever you are, find this book. I promise, you’ll be astonished and nourished. -Daniel Lawless, Editor of Plume

Congratulations on your new book of poetry, Patricia!

Check out Patricia’s poetry featured in Issue 7 here, Issue 8 here, and Issue 17 here. Keep up-to-date with Patricia and her writing at her website here.

Contributor Update, Kathleen Winter

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Kathleen Winter on being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon. The DMQ Virtual Salon is a series in which authors share poems from their 2020 books. Kathleen released her latest book of poems titled Transformer in June of this year. It is currently on sale through Small Press Distribution. This collection of poems focuses on violence and domestic abuse, the pain that often comes with revisiting the past, and the nakedness with which one must present herself in order to discuss these things. Kathleen uses historical references and a transcendence through physical spaces we are all familiar with in order to craft a narrative that is electric with emotion. Congratulations Kathleen on the release of your new book and for being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon!

Check out Kathleen’s poetry featured in Issue 13 here and Issue 20 here. Be sure to also check out an interview she did for the Chris Rice Cooper Blog here.

Contributor Update, Sigrid Nunez

We are pleased to announce that former Superstition Review contributor Sigrid Nunez has just released a new book titled What Are You Going Through. Sigrid is a New York Times bestselling author and her newest book is one of seven she has written over her career. What Are You Going Through is narrated by a woman who uses the stories of friends, family members, and even strangers to assess the beauty of human nature through the conversations they hold. The narrator is a passive listener until she gets whirled into a life-changing encounter of her very own. What Are You Going Through is currently available for purchase on Amazon.

“Reading Sigrid Nunez’s absorbing new novel is somewhat akin to having a long conversation with someone who is telling you something very important, but is telling it in a very quiet voice. You have to really pay attention. Be assured, however, that the experience will be worth it. You will emerge calmer, meditative, more thoughtful, as if you have benefited from an excellent literary massage of sorts.” –The New York Times Book Review

Congratulations Sigrid!

Learn more about Sigrid at her website here or by reading her Issue 10 interview here.

ASU’s Common Read to Host Jonathan Safran Foer

Join Arizona State University’s Department of English in welcoming author Jonathan Safran Foer at a virtual event to be hosted on October 1, 2020 from 6:00-7:30 p.m. The goal of the Common Read program is to have incoming freshman read and write about a topic of interest that relates to ASU’s mission for change. For this event, the focus will be on environmental protection, as is described in Jonathan’s book We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast. The event, where Jonathan will discuss his book and answer questions from students and staff, is free and open to the public. More information about the event and a link to register for the reading can be found here.

You can find out more about Jonathan and his latest book here and more about ASU’s Common Read here.

The Grief Manuscript: An Interview with Frankie Rollins and Eric Aldrich


An Authors Talk


“The one thing I always know is mine is my artwork…my writing life…”

During her divorce in 2017, Frankie Rollins began creating her most recent work: The Grief Manuscript, as both a “compulsive and cathartic” way to channel the grief she found herself experiencing.

As humans, we are no stranger to grief—it can come in many shapes and forms, and it often affects us in ways we cannot predict. Oftentimes, we see grief as a negative experience, but, during this raw and vulnerable podcast, Frankie shares how grief can produce beautiful things—if we let it.

Frankie also discusses the power that art and writing provided her with in overcoming grief and turning it into a project that propelled and inspired her.

This Authors Talk with Frankie Rollins and Eric Aldrich is a rejuvenating, gentle (and much needed) reminder that though we may feel the grief of what we have lost, we can always hold onto the one thing that will always be ours—art.



Learn more about Frankie at her website.

Learn more about Eric at his website.

ASU Undergraduates- Apply Now to Intern at Superstition Review!

Are you an ASU student looking to gain experience that will prepare you for your career? Are you interested in creative writing, publishing, marketing, blogging, advertising, or social networking? And most importantly, do you want to have fun and make connections with other students in your field?

Then an internship at Superstition Review will be perfect for you!

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. Founded by Patricia Colleen Murphy in 2008, the mission of the journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world. We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction and poetry and pride ourselves on creating a strong community of contributors and interns.

About The Program:

This internship is a two-semester program. The first semester is a training course (ENG 394) that offers study in the field of literary magazines and prepares students for potential internship roles. Upon successful completion of this course, students are assigned one of several internship roles and join the intern course (ENG 484). Intern roles include Content Area Editors, Bloggers, Social Media Managers, and more.

All work for both courses is completed online and ASU undergraduates from all fields are welcome and encouraged to apply. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Please note that this internship is available only to ASU in-person students.*

Questions can be emailed to superstition.review@gmail.com. Apply Now!

What Our Interns Have To Say:

  • “I’m so grateful that I had the opportunity to intern at Superstition Review. I developed a number of professional skills—including web editing, interpersonal communication, networking, and content creation—that make me feel much more confident in my search for a job after graduation. Trish is a wonderful mentor, and I have learned so much from her!” ~Rachel Hagerman, Issue 23 & 24 Content Coordinator, Issue 25 Student Editor-in-Chief
  • “I was not prepared for the amount of experience I got from being Fiction Editor for Superstition Review. Having access to so much literature from a variety of people and levels of writing showed me what a wide world writing is. I know that my writing has improved from all that reading, and I’m happy with how much everyone was able to pitch in and help create such a fantastic issue.” ~Lucas Selby, Issue 25 Fiction Editor
  • “Interning at Superstition Review has not only given me preparation for a career past college, but I’ve also been lucky enough to create relationships and connections with my fellow interns, staff, and our contributors. I am so grateful for the experience I’ve gained from these past 3 semesters— I’ve learned so much about the publishing world, as well as what good leadership and teamwork look like.” ~Payton Kline, Issue 25 & 26 Content Coordinator
  • “During my two semesters as the Advertising Coordinator for Superstition Review, I learned so much about organization, effective and efficient communication, newsletter creation, and deadlines. These are helpful challenges you will find in any role you take within the magazine. If you are pursuing a career in writing, editing, or publishing in general, an internship with a literary magazine on your résumé is pretty nice to have!” ~Stephen Lupkin, Issue 24 & 25 Advertising Coordinator
  • “This internship has taught me so much about literary magazines, publishing, and the careers available in the literary community. At Superstition Review, you have the opportunity to put your skills to the test and work to create a fantastic magazine. I have grown so much in the past few semesters thanks to the way this internship encouraged me to push out of my comfort zone and create something I’m proud of.” ~Kelsey Kerley, Issue 25 Social Media Manager, Issue 26 Student Editor-in-Chief