ASU Undergraduate Writers Showcase

Kelsey Kerley, Issue 26 Student Editor-in-Chief

Join the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing on Thursday, November 19, 2020, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Arizona time for an ASU Undergraduate Writers Showcase. The event will take place via Zoom and is free. For more details and to register for the event, click here.

Carolina Quintreo, Issue 27 Poetry Editor

Special congratulations to Kelsey Kerley, Superstition Review Issue 26 student editor-in-chief and Carolina Quintero, incoming poetry editor for Issue 27. Both will be featured in the ASU Undergraduate Writers Showcase. Kelsey can be found on Twitter and Instagram. Carolina can be found on LinkedIn. We are so proud of both of you!

Humanities Dialogues at Poly: Stop Motion Animation, Juvenile-Lit Censorship, Transnational Feminist Activism

The fall 2020 Humanities Dialogues online at ASU Poly concludes on Nov. 17 at 3 p.m., with presentations and dialogue about the work of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication scholars:

Wendy Williams, Assistant Professor of English
“Visual Storytelling: A Closer Look at Stop Motion Animation” 

This presentation will consider how visual and multimodal literacies are at work in students’ stop motion animation projects. This research is part of a multi-year study investigating how college students interpret and compose visual narratives such as picturebooks, comics, animation and short films.


Kendall Dawson, MA student in Narrative Studies
“Molded Youth: The Implications of Children’s Literature Censorship”

This presentation will focus on commonly challenged juvenile fiction books and the material deemed ‘inappropriate’ for our youth. 

Rafael Martinez Orozco, Assistant Professor of Southwest Borderlands
“Undoing Global Paradigms:  and Spiritual Exercise”

In 2006-2007 Elvira Arellano, a single mother, migrant, deportee and asylum fighter, circumvented the law to advocate for human rights. I’ll analyze the ways in which immigrant women like Elvira Arellano use spiritual activism as a component of global immigrant rights movements to produce new feminist discourses that de-center nation states and complicate colonial models that uphold racialized and gendered borders.

The series is coordinated by the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts’ Faculty of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication. Contact Professor Ian Moulton at his email, Ian.Moulton@asu.edu, with any questions or concerns. Be sure to check out what the ASU website has to say about the event as well. 

Special congratulations to Kendall Dawson for her presentation on literature censorship. Kendall Dawson is the interview editor for Issue 26 of Superstition Review this semester. Check out Kendall’s Twitter and LinkedIn. We are so proud of you, Kendall!

Contributor Update, Kirsten Voris

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Kirsten Voris on her feature in the recently published Embodied Healing: Survivor and Facilitator Voices from the Practice of Trauma Sensitive Yoga. This collection of essays explores the applications of TCTSY–Trauma Center Trauma Sensitive Yoga–as a powerful evidence-based modality to help clients heal in the aftermath of trauma. Kirsten is a featured essayist in this collection, edited by Jennifer Turner (North Atlantic Books). The anthology is available for purchase via Penguin Random House. All proceeds from sales of this book will go towards direct service initiatives aimed at opening classes that otherwise would not have funding. Since being featured on the blog, Kirsten also co-wrote Trauma Sensitive Yoga Deck for Kids, which is a deck of  50 yoga shapes created for trauma-sensitive yoga facilitators, and can also be purchased via Penguin Random House.

Congratulations, Kirsten!

To see what else Kirsten has been up to, check out her Twitter and Instagram. Be sure to also read her nonfiction piece featured in Issue 18.

Contributor Update, Sean Prentiss

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Sean Prentiss on some achievements he has made since being featured in Issues 13 and 15. In February of this year, Sean released his collection of poems Crosscut, which is his poetic debut and tells of his time spent working as a trail builder in the Pacific Northwest. Crosscut is available for purchase through University of New Mexico Press. Sean also co-edited The Science of Story: The Brain Behind Creative Nonfiction, which was published in January of this year and explores the relationship between neuroscience and creative nonfiction. The Science of Story: The Brain Behind Creative Nonfiction is available for purchase through Bloomsbury. The last bit of news Sean is celebrating is his the release of his forthcoming Advanced Creative Nonfiction: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology, set to release sometime in 2021. This anthology is an advanced level creative nonfiction textbook and anthology, available for pre-order via Bloomsbury.

Congratulations on everything you have accomplished since your Superstition Review features, Sean!

To see what else Sean has been up to, check out his website and his Twitter. Be sure to also check out his pieces featured in Issue 13 and 15.

Issue 26 Launch

We hope you can join us for our virtual launch party for Issue 26 on December 1st from 5:00-6:00pm MST / Arizona time. We will celebrate the release of our Social Justice Issue with a reading from Alberto Rios. The event will take place virtually via Zoom. We look forward to seeing you there!

A Little Bit About Our Featured Reader: Alberto Ríos, Arizona’s inaugural poet laureate and a recent chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, is the author of twelve collections of poetry, most recently, Not Go Away Is My Name, preceded by A Small Story about the Sky, The Dangerous Shirt, and The Theater of Night, which received the PEN/Beyond Margins Award Published in the New YorkerParis ReviewPloughshares, and other journals, he has also written three short story collections and a memoir, Capirotada, about growing up on the Mexican border, with a novel forthcoming, A Good Map of All Things.  Ríos is also the host of the PBS programs Art in the 48 and Books & Co.  University Professor of Letters, Regents’ Professor, Virginia G. Piper Chair in Creative Writing, and the Katharine C. Turner Chair in English, Ríos has taught at Arizona State University since 1982.  In 2017, he was named director of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University.

Book Giveaways: Upcoming Contests

Over the next few weeks, SR staff is running a contest on Twitter, and each prize will be a book from one of our interview authors for Issue 26.

The first contest will be Social Justice Book Recs, taking place on November 12-15. Tweet us a pic of your favorite social justice book and tell us why you love it. Two winners will be selected to receive a copy of The New American by Micheline Aharonian Marcom or The Office of Historical Corrections by Danielle Evans.

The New American by Micheline Aharonian Marcom

Simon & Schuster

The Office of Historical Corrections by Danielle Evans

Riverhead Books

The second contest will be a Social Justice Book Spine Poetry Contest, taking place on November 19-22. Tweet us a poem made out of book spines that has to do with Social Justice and tell us why you are a social justice advocate. We will pick two winners to receive a copy of This Is All I Got by Lauren Sandler or Disability Visibility by Alice Wong.

This Is All I Got by Lauren Sandler  

Random House 

Disability Visibility by Alice Wong

Vintage

Contributor Update, Thomas Legendre

Join Superstition Review in congratulating Thomas Legendre on taking part in Creative Archaeology – Finding the Present in the Past. In this online event, hosted by Archaeology Scotland, Thomas Legendre takes us on a journey to Kilmartin Glen, exploring the prehistoric landscape through fictional writing. How do Neolithic sites become “personal” to us? How does the past become present, and the present past? Check out the video, available on YouTube.

Thomas Legendre’s most recent novel, Keeping Time, was published by Acre Books/University of Cincinnati Press. His previous work includes The Burning (a novel), Half Life (a play produced by NVA and the National Theatre of Scotland), and Dream Repair (a radio drama aired by BBC Radio 4). He is an Assistant Professor in English at the University of Nottingham. For more detail visit Thomas’s website here.

Congratulations, Thomas!

Check out Thomas’s Twitter and his fiction featured in Issue 18 here

Creative writing alumni Caitlin Horrocks & W. Todd Kaneko visit ASU

Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 @ 7:00 p.m. (AZ/MST)  |  Online

Register: https://asu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMscO6urjstGd1dAZcjygFWu5cFf47IXAe1

The Creative Writing Program in the Department of English at ASU presents a virtual reading by two of its star graduates: fiction writer Caitlin Horrocks (MFA 2007) and poet W. Todd Kaneko (MFA 2006). The event takes place on Thursday, November 19, 2020 at 7 p.m. AZ/MST (6 p.m. PST / 8 p.m. CST / 9 p.m. EST). A link to attend will be provided after registration.

About the authors

Caitlin Horrocks is author of the novel The Vexations, named one of the 10 best books of 2019 by the Wall Street Journal, and the story collections Life Among the Terranauts (forthcoming January 2021) and This is Not Your City. Her stories and essays appear in The New YorkerThe Best American Short Stories, The PEN/O. Henry Prize StoriesThe Pushcart Prize, The Paris Review, Tin HouseOne Story and elsewhere. She teaches at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

W. Todd Kaneko is the author of This Is How the Bone Sings (Black Lawrence Press, 2020) and The Dead Wrestler Elegies, 2nd Edition (New Michigan Press, 2021), and co-author of Slash / Slash (Diode Editions, 2021) and Poetry: A Writers’ Guide and Anthology (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). His poetry and prose have appeared in PoetryAlaskan Quarterly ReviewThe Normal SchoolBarrelhouseBest Small Fictions, and many other places. A Kundiman fellow, he is an associate professor of writing at Grand Valley State University and lives with his family in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Register: https://asu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMscO6urjstGd1dAZcjygFWu5cFf47IXAe1

More information: Justin Petropoulos, Justin.Petropoulos@asu.edu

Contributor Update, Dorianne Laux

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Dorianne Laux on being nominated a 2020 Pulitzer Prize finalist! Her sixth collection, Only As the Day is Long: New and Selected Poems was named a finalist for the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Dorianne is also celebrating her forthcoming chapbook Salt edited by Vaughan Fielder. Since being featured in Superstition Review, Dorianne’s piece “Lapse” was listed in the 2017 Best American Poetry edited by Natasha Tretheway. The poem was originally published in the online literary magazine Plume and can be read here.

Congratulations, Dorianne!

Hear what Richard Blanco, fifth presidential inaugural poet in U.S. history, has to say about Dorianne here. Be sure to also check out Dorianne’s website here and her Twitter here. Take a look at her poetry featured in Issue 8 here.

Intern Update: Colleen Stinchcombe

Today’s intern update features Issue 11’s social media manager Colleen Stinchcombe. Her recent article “How One TikTok Star Is Giving BIPOC-Owned Seattle Restaurants a Big Boost” was featured in Eater Seattle. Eater is a Vox media food and dining network dedicated to food news and dining guides for some of the biggest cities in America. You can check out Colleen’s article featured in Eater here.

Colleen is a freelance writer and editor in Seattle. She has written for Sierra Magazine, Outside Online, The Seattle Times, Lonely Planet, and SELF. Check out her website here and her Twitter here.