Contributor Update, Rebecca Durham

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Rebecca Durham on the release of her debut poetry collection Half-Life of Empathy. Rebecca is a poet, botanist, and artist. She has earned an M.S. in botany, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing (Poetry), and is currently working towards a Doctorate in Interdisciplinary Studies. For the last nine years, she has been researching vascular plants and lichens at the MPG Ranch, a conservation research property. Half-Life of Empathy jumps off of Rebecca’s knowledge of ecology and centers around human relationships with nature in an ever-increasingly industrialized society. In an interesting twist on nature poetry, Rebecca moves away from a human-centered view of nature and describes nature as it exists and an Earth that has regained control of itself. Half-Life of Empathy is currently available for purchase through Small Press Distribution and on Amazon.

“What a beautiful use of the words of water and geology and all things living. Durham writes a new ecological poetry, resonant, rich, and also very aware of what it means to be writing when this never-ending industrial revolution is putting all at risk.” – Juliana Spahr

Find out more about Rebecca at her website and be sure to check out her work featured in Issue 17.

Iron City Magazine Issue 5 Launch

Join Superstition Review in celebrating the launch of Issue 5 for fellow Arizona-based literary magazine Iron City Magazine. The launch for their fifth issue will take place virtually on November 7th from 6 to 8pm. Iron City Magazine was founded in 2016 and features the art and writing of prison inmates from across the country. The goal of the magazine is to demonstrate that prison inmates are people (artists, poets, authors) first, and prisoners second. The magazine gives a platform to those whose voices are often see as unworthy of being listened to and shines a light on the good these people can still do for their community. The launch of the magazine will include literary readings of poetry, nonfiction, and fiction, an art slideshow, and a live Q&A.

To RSVP, click here. To pre-order Issue 5, visit the Iron City Magazine website. To support Iron City Magazine, shop their merchandise available on Redbubble.

BIPOC Creator: Antoinette Cauley

This week’s BIPOC creator feature is local Phoenix-based artist Antoinette Cauley. Antoinette is a Phoenix native and studied art at Mesa Community College. She apprenticed with oil painter Chris Saper and is now known for her hip hop and urban-influenced work. Antoinette is an educator and an activist, teaching inner city youth how to paint. Her work focuses on her own internal struggles, as well as modern social issues and rap culture. Antoinette was named best local artist by AZ Foothills Magazine in 2017 and 2018 and was featured in Phoenix Magazine’s “Great 48:48 Influential People in the State of Arizona.” Her most recent project was a portrait of the late poet and novelist James Baldwin, which was transformed by Jason Harvey into a mural on the side of his Ten-O-One office building in the heart of the Roosevelt Arts District in downtown Phoenix. The installation of this mural was in response to the Black Lives Matter movement that took place earlier this year.

Antoinette’s work is colorful and striking. It plays with the public imagination of the black community in a way that exposes the fears that often come with inner city youth. Her paintings  display images of young Black girls in powerful positions with dynamic juxtapositions that challenge the viewers perception on gender roles, childhood trauma and the influence of pop culture on our youth.  It is a brilliant way for a black rights activist such as Antoinette, who works with inner city youth on a regular basis, to shine a light on societal misconceptions that encompass the lives of black youth.

Be sure to take a look at Antoinette’s Instagram, Twitter, and website. If you are interested in finding out more about Antoinette’s personal life and the motives behind her work, check out this interview conducted earlier this year by the Phoenix Art Museum.

Upcoming Queer Poetry Salon Event

Join Equality Arizona in celebrating queer artists this Saturday, October 17th, in a Queer Poetry Salon event held virtually. Queer Virtual Salon is local organization that acknowledges the voices and poetry of queer individuals. There will be an open mic where six people will have a chance to share their work. From then, the event will focus on the publication of a new full-length poetry collection by féi Hernandez published by Sun Dress Publications. féi Hernandez is an immigrant trans non-binary artist whose work has been featured in several literary magazines. They are an Advisory Board member of Gender Justice Los Angeles. The event will also feature guest speaker Nicole Goodwin, a New York-based poet and performance artist. Click the link here to register for the event.

For more information please contact Julian Delacruz at: jdelac17@asu.edu

Contributor Update, Luiza Flynn-Goodlett

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Luiza Flynn-Goodlett on the release of her upcoming book, Look Alive by Southeast Missouri Press and winner of the 2019 Cowles Poetry Prize. Luiza is an an award-winning author whose poems have been featured in several journals, including Triquarterly and North American Review. She has released six chapbooks, but Look Alive will be her first full-length book. It is set to be available in March of 2021 and tells of the development of the femme queer self. Look Alive is a collection of poems that assesses queerness by placing the narrator at the brunt end of societal and personal violence. The book will take its readers through a journey of queer self-discovery that involves taking to the gentle and accepting queerness of nature. It is available for preorder through Southeast Missouri Press, Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

“[Look Alive]takes you to the prairie, to the creek, to the kitchen counter, to bed—muddies you, then scrubs you clean. With a speaker who keeps your secrets and shouts your glories, Look Alive reveals the enduring territory of embodied queer womanhood—efflorescent and as susceptible to pleasure as it is to harm. Flynn-Goodlett quilts together rural origins and distance traveled, along with rich image and hardwearing language, into an impressive debut with the weight of an heirloom. If you let it, Look Alive can be the guardian inoculation that pierces you with a little taste of the big grief and the big joy so you can survive them when they come.” – Alicia Mountain

Be sure to take a look at Luiza’s website here, her Twitter here, and her work in Issue 17 here.

BIPOC Creator: Leslie Marmon Silko

Join us in taking a look at our first BIPOC creator feature, Leslie Maron Silko. In this series, we will attempt to highlight female and BIPOC creators to go along with this semester’s theme of social justice.

Leslie Marmon Silko was born was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico near the Laguna Pueblo reservation and stayed there until she graduated from the University of New Mexico. She is a Native American author and an influential figure in the 21st century Native American Renaissance. She is the author of eleven novels and has codified several traditional stories from the Laguna Pueblo Tribe. Her writing ranges from Native American folklore to postmodern literature, and focuses heavily on the presence of racism and white imperialism in America. One theme that is of particular interest in her writing is time as a circular concept, as most Native American communities view it. Her writing draws from the cultures and traditions she grew up immersed in and the struggles for Native American communities to retain their identity in an Anglicized America. Leslie, along with being a Native American rights activist, is also an avid women’s rights activist. Leslie has taught at several universities across the United States including two in Arizona, Navajo Community College and University of Arizona.

Be sure to check out what Poets.org and the Poetry Foundation have to say about Leslie.

Contributor Update, Mark Neely

Join us in congratulating former award-winning Superstition Review contributor Mark Neely on winning the Idaho Prize for Poetry 2020 with his piece Ticker. The Idaho Prize for Poetry is an annual, national competition offering $1,000 plus publication by Lost Horse Press for a book-length poetry manuscript. Mark’s manuscript has been recognized by Lost Horse Press for its innovative way of approaching complex issues such as aging and politics. Check out what Lost Horse Press had to say about Mark Neely winning the 2020 Idaho Prize for Poetry here.

Mark is the author of Dirty Bomb, Beasts of the Hill, and Four of a Kind – check out his books for sale on Barnes&Noble! Mark currently lives in Muncie, Indiana where he is a professor of English at Ball State University.

Congratulations, Mark!

Find out more about Mark by visiting his website here and by reading his poems featured in Issue 10 here.

“This and That” Art Exhibit by Jenita Landrum

Explore the artwork of Jenita Landrum during the premiere of her art exhibit “This and That” all next week. Jenita’s artwork focuses on gender, race, and class and their presence in urban living spaces. The event launched yesterday, Sunday October 4th and will continue in the Downtown Phoenix Library’s Vault Gallery until October 14th. Jenita has traveled the world for her art studies, having visited Africa, Germany, and Poland for various fellowships. She is currently an art history and studio instructor with Maricopa Community Colleges. We hope to see you at this event!

Check out the ASU Events page here for more information about the exhibit.

Office for Veteran and Military Academic Engagement Webinar

When Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez went looking for books about Latinxs who served in World War II, she couldn’t find any. She decided not only to write her own, but also to produce one of the most important audiovisual archives dedicated to Latinx veterans, activists and community leaders across the country, spanning three wars and decades of advocacy.

Join ASU’s Office for Veteran and Military Academic Engagement for a Zoom webinar with renowned scholar and founding director of the Voces Oral History Center, Dr. Maggie Rivas Rodriguez, of the University of Texas at Austin, who will discuss her two decades of work rescuing stories of Latinx veterans from World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

Get more information about the event and find the link to register via Zoom here.