Contributor Update, Caitlin Horrocks

Join Superstition Review in congratulating one of our past contributors, Caitlin Horrocks, on her new book, Life Among the Terranauts, out now. Named a Best Book of January 2021 by Entertainment Weekly and Apple Books, this collection of short stories “demonstrates all the inventiveness that won admirers for Horrocks’s first collection. In “The Sleep,” reprinted in Best American Short Stories, residents of a town in the frigid Midwest decide to hibernate through the bitter winters. In the title story, half a dozen people move into an experimental biodome for a shot at a million dollars, if they can survive two years. And in “Sun City,” published in The New Yorker, a young woman meets her grandmother’s roommate in the wake of her death and attempts to solve the mystery of whether the two women were lovers.”

“Vigorous and supremely crafted, Horrocks’s second collection explores human frailties, desires, and mechanisms for survival… Horrocks’s linguistic finesse and narrative range is impressive, and she brings incisive humor, pathos, and wit to her characters and their predicaments. The result is an immersive and engaging work that astutely captures the complexities of the human condition.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Click here to order your copy of Life Among the Terranauts. Be sure to also check out Caitlin’s website and Twitter, as well as, our interview with her in Issue 9.

Contributor Update, Claire Fuller

Join Superstition Review in congratulating one of our past contributors, Claire Fuller, on her forthcoming book, Unsettled Ground, out May 18th. The novel follows “an unusual family held together by a string of lies, a small town with too many questions, and a sudden death that threatens to undo them all.” Through this tale, Claire “masterfully builds a [story] of sacrifice and hope, of homelessness and hardship, of love and survival, in which two marginalized and remarkable people uncover long-held family secrets and, in their own way, repair, recover, and begin again.”

Unsettled Ground is a gorgeously written celebration of the natural world as well as a moving portrait of a family struggling against time. Through buried secrets and private longings, the Seeders emerge as multi-layered characters living at the fringes of society. This book is ultimately about redemption—about the unexpected importance of neighbors, lovers, and friends, and the ways in which we can re-envision our lives for the better, even after the unimaginable has occurred.”

Lucy Tan, author of What We Were Promised

A US launch event for the book will be held on publication date, May 18th, online via McNally Jackson. For more details on the event as well as more about Claire’s US book tour, please visit her website

Click here to pre-order your copy of Unsettled Ground. Be sure to also check out Claire’s Twitter and our interview with her in Issue 21.

Intern Update, L.S. Popovich

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past intern Ljubo Popovich on his forthcoming novel, The Arden, out April 8th. Together, Ljubo and his wife wrote this science fiction, horror, comedy under the pen name L.S. Popovich. The story follows Kaneda, a homeless hacker, who, finding a portal, visits the future with his band mates and must “discover how an ecological disaster turned Earth into a man-eating forest to prevent the apocalypse”. With this as its plot, the novel explores ideas of both environmentalism and anti-environmentalism.

“This dark, environmental fable is a thought-provoking strange trip that I didn’t want to end.”

David David Katzman, award-winning author of A Greater Monster

To order your copy of The Arden click here. Also be sure to check out Ljubo’s website, as well as, his past work with Issue 8.

CISA’s Humanities Lecture Series

Join the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts for their Humanities Lecture Series for spring 2021.

The Humanities Lecture Series is organized in order to provide “us with opportunities to analyze, discuss, and interpret current research and events. We look forward to public discussions that help us understand and appreciate various points of view on political, social, and cultural issues.”

The first lecture, next Wednesday evening, features CISA instructor Mike Pfister and Leah Marche, co-founders of JazzMEETSPoetry, who will discuss “Policing Art: The Arts and Humanities during Times of Unrest.”

To learn more about the Humanities Lecture Series click here.

Contributor Update, Luiza Flynn-Goodlett

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Luiza Flynn-Goodlett on the release of her upcoming book, Look Alive. This poetry collection explores the development of the femme queer self and assesses queerness by placing the narrator at the brunt end of societal and personal violence. The book will take its readers through a journey of queer self-discovery that involves taking to the gentle and accepting queerness of nature. Look Alive is already receiving accolades as a finalist for numerous awards, including The National Poetry Series, and winner of the 2019 Cowles Poetry Book Prize from Southeast Missouri State University Press.

“Luiza Flynn-Goodlett’s smart, sensual, agile collection takes you to the prairie, to the creek, to the kitchen counter, to bed—muddies you, then scrubs you clean. With a speaker who keeps your secrets and shouts your glories, Look Alive reveals the enduring territory of embodied queer womanhood—efflorescent and as susceptible to pleasure as it is to harm. Flynn-Goodlett quilts together rural origins and distance traveled, along with rich image and hardwearing language, into an impressive debut with the weight of an heirloom. If you let it, Look Alive can be the guardian inoculation that pierces you with a little taste of the big grief and the big joy so you can survive them when they come.” 

Alicia Mountain, author of High Ground Coward

Additionally, there will be a virtual launch party for the book on March 4th hosted by Booksmith and The Bindery, in which Luiza will be joined by K-Ming Chang, Alicia Mountain, Arhm Choi Wild and Meg Day for a group reading. The event is free and for all ages. To RSVP click here.

Click here to pre-order your own copy of Look Alive. Also, be sure to check of Luiza’s website and Twitter, as well as, her poetry featured in Issue 17.

Contributor Update, Laura Wetherington

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Laura Wetherington on the publication of her poetry collection, Parallel Resting Places. As the winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize, Laura’s collection explores the world of translation. More specifically, Parallel Resting Places navigates, “What happens when a poet tries to filter the untranslatable from another language? The rush of unknowing, decoding the wind, the body becomes an antenna. Following behind Jack Spicer’s After Lorca and swinging its ovaries, Laura Wetherington’s second book uses the concept of translation to create original poems from the work of writers like Liliane Giraudon, Marie Étienne, Dominique Fourcade, and Jean-Marie Gleize. These poems run through a liminal linguistic space where meaning, mishearing, and dreams collide, sometimes midsentence, where they hinge into song… Interstitial love letters to queer writers process a miscarriage, the most recent election, and queer puppy love. This is a book of yearning-for a foreign tongue, for a body growing inside the body, and for a form of communication that can capture feeling.”

There is a constant textual drama in the address and voice of Laura Wetherington’s heady poems; a mirror staged. With monologues, letters, lyrics, and prose she performs a writing through to a new ground of sensation and thinking. Call it the present. The music is gorgeous and the sound is captivating. Parallel Resting Places is a wonderful book and a welcome addition to a tradition that troubles tradition.

Peter Gizzi, author of Archeophonics

Click here to order your copy of Parallel Resting Places. Also, be sure to check out Laura’s Twitter and Website, as well as, her poetry in our Issue 19.

ZAUM, Creative Writing Journal

Join Sonoma State University in their submissions period for their literary magazine, ZAUMS’s, 25th issue. ZAUM is both edited and designed by students, as well as, accepts submissions from any student, whether they attend SSU or any other university. The magazine is distributed across the Bay Area and is overseen by faculty advisor, Professor, and Poet-in-Residence Gillian Conoley. “Each issue publishes over 100 pages a year of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or visual art…”

ZAUM has been publishing for over 20 years, and the magazine has received “several national student awards from the Associated Writing Programs: for editorial vision (1996), and for graphic design (1998).” Additionally, “student work from issue # 6 and # 7 were nominated for the prestigious Pushcart Prize, a national prize open to any writer in the country.”

ZAUM is currently accepting submissions, with their priority deadline as February 20th and their final deadline as February 28th.

To learn more about ZAUM and their submissions process click here. Also, be sure to follow ZAUM on Twitter.

We can’t wait to see your work!

Contributor Update, Sara Sams

Join Superstition Review in congratulating one of our past faculty advisors, Sara Sams, on her forthcoming book, Atom City, out May 14th. Atom City is a collection of poems exploring the topic of the atomic bomb and The Manhattan Project’s creation of the city Oak Ridge. Inspired by historian Peter Bacon Hales’ Atomic Spaces, Sara’s work takes the perspective of an observer contemplating and witnessing such concepts as, “the rhetoric of the Manhattan Engineering District, the militarization of scientific conversations, the mythologized stories of the local residents of Oak Ridge Valley before it was condemned, the use of such myths to underscore the morality of the bomb, current exhibits at the American Museum of Science and Energy, [her] own family’s participation in the Project and the stories they’ve hot-potato’d since, the atomification of so much of [her] hometown (including [her] high school’s logo), and so on.”

“Sara Sams’ Atom City shows us what violence and invisible interiority and tenderness is at the core of the American Hometown.

Sarah Vap, author of Viability

Click here to pre-order Atom City. Be sure to also check out Sara’s website and Twitter, as well as, Issue 22, in which she helped create and advised on.

Contributor Update, Paisley Rekdal

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Paisley Rekdal on her forthcoming book, Appropriate A Provocation, which will be released on February 16th. The book explores the concept of appropriation, as well as, the questions: “How do we properly define cultural appropriation, and is it always wrong? If we can write in the voice of another, should we? And if so, what questions do we need to consider first?” Paisley, in the novel, “addresses a young writer to delineate how the idea of cultural appropriation has evolved—and perhaps calcified—in our political climate. What follows is a penetrating exploration of fluctuating literary power and authorial privilege, of whiteness and what we really mean by the term empathy, that examines writers from William Styron to Peter Ho Davies to Jeanine Cummins.”

“Anyone who wishes to understand appropriation, and not just react to it, should read this book. Paisley Rekdal brings years of teaching, writing, and critical thinking to this subject, with literary analyses, historical and theoretical frameworks, and practical advice. Appropriate is a book of immense wisdom and clarity, sure to become required reading for writers everywhere.”

—Beth Bich Minh Nguyen, author of Stealing Buddha’s Dinner

Click here to pre-order Appropriate A Provocation. Be sure to also check out Paisley’s website and Twitter, as well as, our interview with her from Issue 19 and her past Authors Talk.

Contributor Update, Lessa-Cross Smith

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Lessa-Cross Smith on her new book, This Close to Okay. The fiction novel depicts two strangers and the weekend they share, after, one, Tallie Clark, spots the other, Emmet, standing at the edge of a bridge. The story alternates between the two’s perspectives as they come closer to learning the truth as to what brought them together.

“Leesa Cross-Smith is a consummate storyteller who uses her formidable talents to tell the oft-overlooked stories of people living in that great swath of place between the left and right coasts.”

Roxane Gay, New York Times bestselling author

To order This Close to Okay click here. Also, be sure to check of Lessa-Cross’ website and Twitter, as well as, our interview with her from Issue 15.