Intern Update: Colleen Stinchcombe

Today’s intern update features Issue 11’s social media manager Colleen Stinchcombe. Her recent article “How One TikTok Star Is Giving BIPOC-Owned Seattle Restaurants a Big Boost” was featured in Eater Seattle. Eater is a Vox media food and dining network dedicated to food news and dining guides for some of the biggest cities in America. You can check out Colleen’s article featured in Eater here.

Colleen is a freelance writer and editor in Seattle. She has written for Sierra Magazine, Outside Online, The Seattle Times, Lonely Planet, and SELF. Check out her website here and her Twitter here.

Contributor Update, Mark Dostert

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Mark Dostert on being featured in the Spring 2020 issue of the literary magazine Barzakh. The piece is titled “Step to Your Room” and is a narration on the time he spent as a full-time guard and Children’s Attendant at the Chicago Juvenile Jail. Be sure to check it out for yourself here. Mark Dostert is the author of Up in Here: Jailing Kids on Chicago’s Other Side. He currently teaches at Writespace and holds a Master of Arts in English from University of Houston.

Congratulations, Mark!

Take a look at Mark’s website here and his nonfiction feature in Issue 21 here.

Environmental Humanities Initiative Distinguished Lecture

Environmental Humanities Initiative Distinguished Lecture

WITH A READING GROUP SERIES AND GRADUATE COURSE OPTION

Join the IHR/GIOS for our (now rescheduled) 2020 Environmental Humanities Initiative (EHI) Distinguished Lecture, “From Garden Warriors to Gastrodiplomacy,” with Elizabeth Hoover (video recorded lecture and live Zoom Q and A), November 5, 2020, 4-5:30 pm.

Professor Hoover will explore Native American community based farming and gardening projects; the ways in which people are defining and enacting concepts like food sovereignty and seed sovereignty; the role of Native chefs in the food movement; and the fight against the fossil fuel industry to protect heritage foods.

Hoover is an associate professor in the Environmental Science and Policy Management department at the University of California Berkeley whose work focuses on food sovereignty and environmental justice for Native communities. Her first book “The River is In Us: Fighting Toxics in a Mohawk Community” (University of Minnesota Press, 2107), is an ethnographic exploration of Akwesasne Mohawks’ response to Superfund contamination and environmental health research. Her second book project-in-progress, “From Garden Warriors to Good Seeds; Indigenizing the Local Food Movement,” explores Native American community-based farming and gardening projects. She also recently co-edited a book “Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States with Devon Mihesuah” (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019). 

This event is cosponsored by the IHR’s Environmental Humanities Initiative, The Global Futures Laboratory, The Human Sciences Collaboratory, American Indian Studies, The Global Institute of Sustainability, The Swette Center for Sustainable Food Systems and the School for the Future of Innovation in Society.

Register for the lecture.

Reading Group / One Credit Graduate Course

Prior to the lecture Joni Adamson and Joan McGregor will lead three reading group sessions that aim to explore the work of Elizabeth Hoover and other writers and researchers who focus on the concepts of food justice and food sovereignty. Attendees will gain an enriched understanding of climate justice and food sovereignty activism and research focused on indigenous food cultures, knowledges and agricultural sciences. 

The group will also explore the concept of “global syndemic” or the notion that simultaneous and connected epidemics, including malnutrition, racism, structural inequities, catalyzed by over five centuries of colonization and accelerating neoliberal development, and resource extraction are linked to the current COVID-19 pandemic and exacerbate the underlying conditions — diabetes, asthma, violent policing—that are making the virus more deadly to some. 

Readings will be interdisciplinary and diverse so we learn from the expertise of disciplines both inside and outside of the humanities. With Andrew W. Mellon funding, we will also be collaborating with the University of Pretoria, and reading group members will have the opportunity to interact with our colleagues in South Africa. 

Reading group members have the option of earning one graduate credit in a course co-taught by Joni Adamson (Joni.Adamson@asu.edu, English) and Joan McGregor (j.mcgregor@asu.edu, Philosophy). Students may register for any section cross-listed section of the course ENG/HUL/SFS/SOS/PHI 598 and earn one credit by attending the reading group and completing the readings and some writing assignments. The course will be capped at 20. Please direct any questions about the course to Professors Adamson and McGregor.

·      Reading Group: Environmental Humanities Wrap-up, 11/12, 3 PM MST

Art Blog: Andi Boyd and Graciela García

Andi Boyd is an educator and writer living in Waco, Texas. She holds an MFA from Texas State University and a BA in English from Northwestern State University. She has taught literature and writing to students from kindergarten through university. Her poetry and fiction has been published in anthologies and journals such as Nasty Women Poets, If You Can Hear This: Poems of Protest, Black Warrior Review, Gulf Coast Magazine, Narrative Magazine, ANMLY, Fiction Southeast, Juked, etc. and was named for a top 50 flash fiction piece by Wigleaf

Graciela García is a graphic designer, artist, and writer from Madrid. She studied Fine Arts and holds a Ph.D. from the Complutense University of Madrid. Passionate about psychology, her research on the creative processes in outsider artists are collected in her book Art Brut. La pulsión creativa al desnudo. Her blog El hombre jazmín is an international benchmark in the field of Art Brut. She is currently working in the graphic design studio Se ha ido ya mamá, of which she is a founding partner, combining this activity with research, criticism, and creative curatorial work.

Release Party for Alberto Ríos


A Good Map of All Things 
with Alberto Ríos

Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 6 pm Phoenix MST on Zoom

In the mid-twentieth century, in a stretch of high desert near the U.S.-Mexico border, people are living their lives for the long haul, without lotteries or easy answers or particular luck. Theirs is the everyday, with its small but meaningful joy. Celebrate our Director Alberto Ríos latest novel, A Good Map of All Things on Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. Arizona time on Zoom. Open to the public and free. Individuals who purchase a copy of the book through the Piper Center’s website will receive access to a special meet-and-greet following the event. Learn more and register today here

Contributor Update, Rebecca Durham

Join Superstition Review in congratulating past contributor Rebecca Durham on the release of her debut poetry collection Half-Life of Empathy. Rebecca is a poet, botanist, and artist. She has earned an M.S. in botany, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing (Poetry), and is currently working towards a Doctorate in Interdisciplinary Studies. For the last nine years, she has been researching vascular plants and lichens at the MPG Ranch, a conservation research property. Half-Life of Empathy jumps off of Rebecca’s knowledge of ecology and centers around human relationships with nature in an ever-increasingly industrialized society. In an interesting twist on nature poetry, Rebecca moves away from a human-centered view of nature and describes nature as it exists and an Earth that has regained control of itself. Half-Life of Empathy is currently available for purchase through Small Press Distribution and on Amazon.

“What a beautiful use of the words of water and geology and all things living. Durham writes a new ecological poetry, resonant, rich, and also very aware of what it means to be writing when this never-ending industrial revolution is putting all at risk.” – Juliana Spahr

Find out more about Rebecca at her website and be sure to check out her work featured in Issue 17.

Art Blog: Sève Favre

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This interview about Sève Favre’s recent collection was conducted via email by Art Editor Anna Campbell.

Sève Favre is a visual artist originally from the French part of Switzerland. Sève was introduced to arts from a young age but decided to follow an academic study first: Art History at University. She supplemented her literature degree with secondary school teaching. She continued her education by taking several seminars and workshops in the visual arts, notably at the Ceruleum School of Art in Lausanne. In 2005, she created her first modular artwork and during several years she maintained both careers simultaneously, teaching and private commission for artworks. Today she completely devotes herself to her art practice and promotion. She has been exhibited in Switzerland and abroad. This year, Sève was nominated by Arte Laguna Prize in the installation and sculpture section. Passionate about the concept of integration, she concentrates on transcending the classical boundary between the artwork and the viewer. The main feature of her art is interactivity. The keywords that support her concept are interaction (be together), variation (be different), and activity (be active). Her name for this experience is intervariactivity. Sève can be found on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter @sevefavre. She can be reached via email at info@sevefavre.com.

Superstition Review: You frequently talk about your “intervariactive” art as a synthesis of being together, being different, and being active. What attracted you to the idea initially, and how do you continue to explore it through your work?

Sève Favre:

Yes, being together is interaction, being different is variation, being active is activity. At the beginning, I really wanted to break this classic boundary between the artwork and the spectator, especially through the work on canvas. I found it interesting to integrate the spectator in the process of creating the work, which is a continuous process that starts in my studio but then continues elsewhere thanks to the possible appropriation by the public, a process of co-creation, by revealing the different possibilities of the work. Then, I extended this principle to the interactive double digital of certain works, as you can test it here.

These different possibilities, both real and virtual, multiply the possibilities of participation and interaction. For example, from the digital realisations I can create a gif containing the different proposals made by the participants: a collective work, like this one :

All this can then be shared on social media….

SR: The human component of your work is quite striking. Can you explain your process for creating these pieces?

SF: Indeed in my artwork, the human can be the subject of a work, but is above all the vector of metamorphosis of the artwork (real or digital). In our world where the development of artificial intelligence is dazzling, I find it interesting to highlight our fragility with/on human characteristics,  Moreover, by allowing the spectators to intervene directly on my works, I would like to point out specifically human attitudes, such as trust, risk-taking, respect… etc… The spectators are not mistaken because the first question that comes up most often is if I am not afraid of the consequences of their action on my paintings. I don’t believe that this emotion is one day likely to be a characteristic of robots. This is really what I find interesting and important to make the viewer feel: his humanity.

SR: What does your physical workspace or studio look like?

SF: My artworks require different stages; my studio is organized according to them. First of all, I have a relatively large storage space for materials because I mainly work with mixed techniques so I use different types of materials. Secondly, there is an easel workspace which is very practical especially when I work with pastel chalks; I can tilt my easel to manage the dust from the chalks. On a workbench, I can concentrate on measuring, cutting and origami work. And finally, as far as assembly is concerned (gluing the different parts made), I have to do it on the floor so that the canvas is horizontal and stable. And I like to have a cup of tea near me when I work while listening to the radio or music during my time in the studio.

SR: What is one thing you must have with you as you work?

SF: My necessary tool for absolutely every artwork is my favourite pair of scissors.

SR: How has the global pandemic affected your process?

SF: The pandemic had more of an impact on my exhibition schedule. However, it has allowed me to develop the digital part of my work more, notably thanks to my participation in CADAF online (Contemporary and Digital Art Fair). I also remotely managed the setting up of an in situ installation for an exhibition, as I couldn’t travel to London to do it myself. That was a challenge I wouldn’t have considered in the past.

SR: How is your work touched by social justice?

SF: Behind my work there are fundamental concepts of value and participation. The notion of value in my work is linked to the different possible variations. Are they of equal quality? Only the owner or the public can determine this: is it preferable to keep the artist’s proposal, as this visual will have more value than theirs? Would they like to invite a celebrity to interact with the work and then, religiously preserve the evidence… or do they feel that the choice of a relative will be much more valuable? All these questions are much more intimate and personal in scope than the purely economic value, but they are all equally necessary because they challenge the relationship with objects in a world that continually produces them in disproportionate quantities.

SR: What are your upcoming projects?

SF: First of all, I am working on my new website. Secondly, I am preparing a new installation normally for a Festival, but we have a lot of uncertainty about how it will be held in relation to the pandemic. Next year, I will exhibit my installation “Être au pied du mur” at the Arsenal in Venice as part of the Arte Laguna Prize finalists’ exhibition. As this year is special, I am trying to focus on my digital presence; I think it’s important to also highlight the digital part of my artworks, especially with a project of cultural participation in Switzerland.

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You can find Sève on Instagram here and on Twitter here.

Iron City Magazine Issue 5 Launch

Join Superstition Review in celebrating the launch of Issue 5 for fellow Arizona-based literary magazine Iron City Magazine. The launch for their fifth issue will take place virtually on November 7th from 6 to 8pm. Iron City Magazine was founded in 2016 and features the art and writing of prison inmates from across the country. The goal of the magazine is to demonstrate that prison inmates are people (artists, poets, authors) first, and prisoners second. The magazine gives a platform to those whose voices are often see as unworthy of being listened to and shines a light on the good these people can still do for their community. The launch of the magazine will include literary readings of poetry, nonfiction, and fiction, an art slideshow, and a live Q&A.

To RSVP, click here. To pre-order Issue 5, visit the Iron City Magazine website. To support Iron City Magazine, shop their merchandise available on Redbubble.

BIPOC Creator: Antoinette Cauley

This week’s BIPOC creator feature is local Phoenix-based artist Antoinette Cauley. Antoinette is a Phoenix native and studied art at Mesa Community College. She apprenticed with oil painter Chris Saper and is now known for her hip hop and urban-influenced work. Antoinette is an educator and an activist, teaching inner city youth how to paint. Her work focuses on her own internal struggles, as well as modern social issues and rap culture. Antoinette was named best local artist by AZ Foothills Magazine in 2017 and 2018 and was featured in Phoenix Magazine’s “Great 48:48 Influential People in the State of Arizona.” Her most recent project was a portrait of the late poet and novelist James Baldwin, which was transformed by Jason Harvey into a mural on the side of his Ten-O-One office building in the heart of the Roosevelt Arts District in downtown Phoenix. The installation of this mural was in response to the Black Lives Matter movement that took place earlier this year.

Antoinette’s work is colorful and striking. It plays with the public imagination of the black community in a way that exposes the fears that often come with inner city youth. Her paintings  display images of young Black girls in powerful positions with dynamic juxtapositions that challenge the viewers perception on gender roles, childhood trauma and the influence of pop culture on our youth.  It is a brilliant way for a black rights activist such as Antoinette, who works with inner city youth on a regular basis, to shine a light on societal misconceptions that encompass the lives of black youth.

Be sure to take a look at Antoinette’s Instagram, Twitter, and website. If you are interested in finding out more about Antoinette’s personal life and the motives behind her work, check out this interview conducted earlier this year by the Phoenix Art Museum.

Upcoming Queer Poetry Salon Event

Join Equality Arizona in celebrating queer artists this Saturday, October 17th, in a Queer Poetry Salon event held virtually. Queer Virtual Salon is local organization that acknowledges the voices and poetry of queer individuals. There will be an open mic where six people will have a chance to share their work. From then, the event will focus on the publication of a new full-length poetry collection by féi Hernandez published by Sun Dress Publications. féi Hernandez is an immigrant trans non-binary artist whose work has been featured in several literary magazines. They are an Advisory Board member of Gender Justice Los Angeles. The event will also feature guest speaker Nicole Goodwin, a New York-based poet and performance artist. Click the link here to register for the event.

For more information please contact Julian Delacruz at: jdelac17@asu.edu