Internship Opportunities for ASU Undergraduates Fall 2022

Superstition Review

Internship Opportunities with Superstition Review 

Are you an ASU student interested in creative writing, publishing, marketing, social networking, blogging, or advertising? Do you wish you could get marketable job skills while earning college credit? Do you like to have a little fun while you learn?

Then an internship with Superstition Review is right for you.

Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. Founded in 2008, the mission of the journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work by established and emerging artists and authors from all over the world.

We publish two issues a year with art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction, and poetry. We also enjoy honoring all members of our Superstition Review family by maintaining a strong year-round community of editors, submitters, contributors, and readers on our blog and social networks.

Trainees

Trainees will register for a 3 credit-hour ENG 394 course. The course will offer a study of the field of literary magazines.

Upon successful completion of ENG 394, trainees will enroll in ENG 484 and become active interns with the magazine.

  • All work is done completely online.
  • We welcome interns from all fields.
  • The internship is not available to ASU Online students.
  • Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

What Interns Say:

Trish provided valuable experience in my field of interest that is not offered anywhere else. This class has been a huge eye-opener for me and I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to work in the publishing and editing industry before graduating.

The skills I learned have given me a huge amount of confidence as I begin my search for a job, and I’m so glad this course was available.

Trish is enthusiastic, knowledgeable, and very trusting of her students. Although all the work for SR goes through her, she allows for students to take control and engage in the work fully. Thanks for the wonderful experience!

Trish is extremely personable and is great at making people feel welcomed and she listens very well to her students.

Trish is extremely accessible and welcoming. I felt very comfortable coming to her with questions. I feel I got a great internship experience that will help me post graduation.

Read more about us on our social networks:

        

Preorder One Person Holds So Much Silence Now

Preorder One Person Holds So Much Silence Now


Congratulations to David Greenspan for his debut poetry collection! This book will be released on March 8, 2022, by Driftwood Press. It is available for preorder now on the publisher’s website!

David Greenspan’s One Person Holds So Much Silence explores the intersection of physical and emotional traumas through surprising and jaw-dropping language. Simultaneously lush and bizarre, the poems in One Person Holds So Much Silence culminate in a striking deep dive into the pain and experiences of existing within a body. From self-harm to suicidal ideation, Greenspan tackles these harrowing topics through writing brimming with original language and wrought empathy.

Here is the poetry aimed at our thoughts placed into every muscle and how we manage the weight of being human as we bend, unbend, alive with these brilliant poems! I am grateful for this book!

CA Condrad, Author of AManda Paradise: Resurrect extinct vibration

David Greenspan contributed to Issue 27 with a poem featured in this collection. Get a preview of his poems by reading “We the dead balk” on SR.

Tempe Library Writing Contest 2022

Tempe Library Writing Contest 2022

It’s time for the 8th annual Tempe Writing Contest & Cover Design Contest sponsored by Tempe Public Library, Arizona State University, and The Friends of the Tempe Public Library. The submissions are open now until February 14.

Who can enter? The contest is open to High School students, College students, and adults in the Phoenix area.

What are the submission guidelines?

Poetry – a poem up to 100 lines

Fiction – a short story up to 3500 words

Creative Nonfiction – a work of creative nonfiction up to 3500 words (including essay, memoir, and literary journalism?

Learn more about eligibility, submission guidelines, and cover design specifications on the Tempe Writing Contest website. Winners will be announced on March 12 and the winning entries will be published in print and online on the Tempe Public Library website.

You can submit here. Happy writing!

Intern Update: Rachel Hagerman

Intern Update: Rachel Hagerman

Rachel Hagerman

Congratulations to Superstition Review’s past intern Rachel Hagerman for getting her academic research published in the University of Cincinnati’s peer-reviewed journal Queen City Writers. The chapter from her Barrett, The Honors College at ASU, thesis, “Using Books to Combat Mental Illness Stigma: A Rhetorical Analysis of Public Discourse Sparked by American Young Adult Novels,” was published in December 2021. In her thesis chapter, Rachel analyzes Jay Asher’s Thirteen Reasons Why, Val Emmich’s Dear Evan Hansen, and John Green’s Turtles All the Way Down in order to investigate the conversations surrounding prominent works today and learn that ultimately these novels, among many others, work “to normalize mental illness and combat stigma.” Read the entire chapter here.

By inspiring reader communities, American young adult novels are building a public conversation that normalizes mental illness as a real and common health issue. 

Rachel Hagerman

Rachel Hagerman graduated Spring of 2021. During her time at Superstition Review, she worked as the Content Coordinator for Issue’s 23 and 24 and as the Editor-in-Chief for Issue 25. She currently works as a Client Project Manager at MDS Communications and as a Freelance Writer and Editor. With such an impressive resume under her belt already, we look forward to what she does next!

Art Submissions Open Now

Art submissions for Superstition Review are now open until January 31.

Send us your art submissions! We’d love to see them!

If you’re thinking about submitting, hear what our past Art Editors have to say about submissions to learn more about the art we feature on SR.

“I began viewing our submissions, and I was astounded by the elevated level of craftsmanship I saw in many of the pieces. We had everything: vibrant colors, text+art, and haunting photographs that sent shivers up my spine. After some time, a lot of thinking, and quite a few discussions with Founding Editor Patrica Murphy and Art Faculty Advisor Rebecca Fish Ewan, I came to realize that for this issue, we wanted work that challenged the norms, celebrated diversity, and demanded our attention.” – Anna Campbell, Issue 26

“Kat Babbie’s four textile works are beautiful and dynamic. Her work is also featured on the cover. Carolina Dutca and Valentin Sidorenko’s five photos also include delightful textile elements and beautiful photography.  Takashi Ari’s haunting photographs of Hiroshima that explore the complicated interconnectedness of subjects in Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukushima. To round out the photography, Ashley Miller’s surreal photographs explore themes of consumption. We are also lucky to feature Ali Liebegott’s three wonderful paintings, which explore themes of queerness, food, and domestic spaces.” – Isabelle Kinney, Issue 27

“…As I considered the submissions for art, I thought not only about the stories they told to me, but also what stories they might tell to others, and what stories their creators wanted to tell. And what diverse, thought-provoking stories they told!” Khanh Ngyuen, Issue 28

Does your art challenge norms, tell stories, and demand attention? Don’t miss this opportunity!

Submit your artwork for a chance to be featured in Issue 29 here.

Edited by Randon Billings Noble

Edited by Randon Billings Noble


Randon Billings Noble has compiled a diverse array of writers for a remarkable collection of lyric essays published by the University of  Nebraska Press in October 2021. A Harp in the Stars: An Anthology of Lyric Essays “show lyric essays rely more on intuition than exposition, use image more than narration, and question more than answer.” Although no one summary can begin to capture the essence of these essays, one can expect revelation through flash, segmented, braided, and hermit crab forms, plus a section of craft essays. This collection also features a number of past SR contributors including Dinty W. Moore, Lia Purpura, Sarah Einstein, Elissa Washuta, Julie Marie Wade, Eric Tran, Heidi Czerwiec, and Michael Dowdy.

Randon Billings Noble was featured in Issue 11. If you would like to see even more of Noble’s work, it is featured on her website and she can also be found on Twitter.

I’ve been searching for a book like this for over twenty years. Its remarkable dazzle–a sharp, eclectic anthology combined with whip-smart craft essays–carves out a fascinating look into the bright heart of what the lyric essay can be.

Aimee Nezhukumatahil, author of World of Wonders

A Harp in the Stars is available via the publisher, Amazon, or anywhere books are sold.

Conversations in Craft and Content

Conversations in Craft and Content

Check out Arizona State University’s new creative writing lecture series hosted and moderated by Mitchell Jackson, Guggenheim fellow, Pulitzer winner, and the John O. Whiteman Dean’s Distinguished Professor of English at ASU. Join Jackson as he welcomes two-time National Book Award-winner Jesmyn Ward as the inaugural guest at this virtual event via Zoom on Friday, February 4, 2022, at 6 p.m AZ/MST.

Photo of Jesmyn Ward by Beowulf Sheehan

The Conversations in Craft and Content lecture series is free of charge and open to the public. Take advantage of this great opportunity to learn more about Jesym Ward’s craft including her writing and revision process, philosophies that guide her, and ideas about her work.

Learn more about the moderator, guest, and series on the Department of English’s website and register here!

Out of Which Came Nothing by Laurie Blauner

Laurie Blauner’s Two New Works


Congratulations to Laurie Blauner for releasing a new novel and a book of short stories. Her latest novel is titled Out of Which Came Nothing. Enter a parallel universe with Aaron, a boy wholly dependent on religious cult caretakers in this stunningly lyrical and descriptive world. This novel was published in September 2021 by Spuyten Duyvil and is available now on their website and Amazon.

The sense is almost one of a world somewhere between a fairy tale and a fever dream; a nightmare with ill-defined limits that is both all-encompassing and self-contained.  This is not a contradiction by any means. It is a state of being that is as specific as a recurring nightmare we can’t let go of, a nightmare that takes over our being and drags us deeply into a well of consciousness where voices in the darkness are threatening to follow us into an uncertain darkness. And we go. Because we have no choice not to.

Misfit Magazine

Laurie Blauner’s newest release, I Was One of My Memories, is an essay collection published by PANK magazine since winning its 2020 Nonfiction Book Award. In this book, you will find more of her lyrical prose as she covers topics such as obsession, lies, aging, and what it really means to be human. You can order this book from PANK.

I Was One of My Memories does one of the things that I love most about the thing we call creative nonfiction: it shows us its thinking, its flawed and idiosyncratic and completely delightful thinking. It is a thinking shaped by experience, pleasure, grief, and disappointment, while the diverse forms, the small essays, little animals of the mind, might be read as recursive attempts toward sense making.

J’Lynn Chapman, Contest Judge and author of To Limn / Lying In
I Was One of My Memories by Laurie Blauner (PANK 2021)

You can find Laurie’s contribution to Superstition Review in Issue 21, which features one of the essays in I Was One of My Memories under the same title, and Issue 8, which features her poetry. You can also check out these books and more on her website.

New Crime Novel From John Vanderslice

New Crime Novel From John Vanderslice

Nous Nous by John Vanderslice (Braddock Avenue Books 2021)

We’re excited to share that past contributor John Vanderslice recently put out a new book! The novel, Nous Nous, came out in October from Braddock Avenue Books. Nous Nous is a literary crime drama told through a multitude of voices that follows a child kidnapping in a small town in Arkansas. Lawrence Baine’s world came crashing down around him after his beloved daughter was kidnapped and murdered. Baine’s tormented reaction, however, is to kidnap someone else’s daughter. This girl turns out to be the daughter of Elizabeth Riddle, an Episcopal priest, who struggles to guide her church while trying to rescue her daughter from the clutches of her unusual but suddenly dangerous captor. 

John shares:


One thing about the book which is both curious and a source of pride is that I drafted it several years ago in a Novel Writing Workshop class I was teaching. In that class, I make the students draft a short novel; i.e., 50,000 words. I assign rigid weekly word counts, and I put the students in peer groups so that they receive some regular feedback about their burgeoning drafts. I also think it’s important that I put myself through the same steps I am making them go through. I assign myself to a peer group and give myself the same word count requirements.

Doing it in that class really proved fundamental to the book. One reason is that I received some superb suggestions early on from my peer group which help me clarify some of my characterizations and character issues. The other important result of doing it in that class is that I chose to use a braided narrative structure. I mean a rolling series of chapters in which four different points of view rotate. I figured that would be an easy way to keep me charging though the draft, bring new energy to each chapter as I began it. It did all that, but it also proved to be essential to creating that leave-them-on-the-edge-of-their-seats suspense that authors, especially ones who struggle with plotting, aim for and struggle to enact. And as I looked for ways to make the braids coordination tighter and tighter, I discovered all sorts of interesting and useful connections between the characters that I simply had not planned or envisioned when I started. So that draft came together wonderfully.

Not that there wasn’t a lot of editing ahead of me. I shaped the book for several years after drafting it (while working on other things), and I also found that when it came down to the time for fine-tuning sentences and paragraphs, I’ve never worked with sharper editors than those at Braddock Avenue. They did not legislate anything, but they did make some excellent suggestions that the book truly benefited from.

Anyway, it just feels like kismet: the subject matter I chose, the platform on which I drafted it, and the publisher I eventually found.


John’s story “Capuchin” was featured in Issue 14. He is the author of several books, about which you can learn more on his website. Head to Braddock Avenue Books to purchase a copy of Nous Nous. Thank you for sharing, John!

Flash-Fiction Fairy Tales from Jen Knox

Flash-Fiction Fairy Tales from Jen Knox


Congratulations to Jen Knox for her new book Dandelion Ghosts! Her nine flash-fiction stories explore the human condition in a magical and captivating way. Jen says that these stories are “basically fairy tales for adults.” The book came out in September published by Unleash Creatives.

The story “Dandelion Ghosts” won the Flash Fiction Magazine contest.

In this collection of tautly woven stories, Jen Knox offers us surreal adult parables. The fantastical nudges up against Odd Lots, paying rent, and worrying about aging parents. Logic ricochets off into all kinds of boundless directions, pushing out our sense of the “ordinary” so we learn to expect anything in these stories: a young girl who discovers the backs of her knees spill out coins, an installation artist who talks to the muse in her plump belly. Each character stumbles through a tired, not always empathetic world, but her fears, anxieties and strange talents leave open the possibility for something a little bit better.

Alexandra van de Kamp, author of Kiss/Hierarchy

Jen contributed to Issue 4 and Issue 14. You can buy the book on Amazon and learn more about Jen Knox on her website and Instagram.