Intern Update: Kevin Hanlon

Today’s intern update features Kevin Hanlon, former fiction editor for Issues 12 and 13 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English, Creative Writing and a Doctor of Law JD, Kevin began working as a proofreader for RR Donnelley last year. He has worked as a writer for Java Magazine, a Phoenix-based journal on local arts and culture and YabYum, a music and culture magazine also based in the valley.

We are so proud of you Kevin!

You can view his work on Java Magazine here and his work on YabYum here. If you’d like to learn more, you can check out Kevin’s LinkedIn here.

Intern Update: Leah Newsom

Today’s Intern Update features Leah Newsom, a nonfiction editor from Issue 15 of Superstition Review.

With both a BA and MFA in Creative Writing, Leah has been working as the Senior Outreach Coordinator at the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. She remains a fiction writer, content strategist, marketer and copywriter.

Leah also co-founded Spilled Milk Magazine, an online literary magazine that publishes fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and artwork that is served best with a cup of coffee.

We are so proud of you Leah!

If you’d like to know more, you can visit Leah’s LinkedIn here.

Intern Update: Sydni Budelier

Today’s Intern Update features Sydni Budelier, a blogger for Issue 11 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English/Creative Writing, Sydni has been working as the Director of Communications at Hope for the Day, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing suicide through outreach, education, and action.

Sydni has also worked as a print editorial intern for Nylon Magazine, where she was even featured as a contributing writer in the May 2015 print issue for film review on Far From the Madding Crowd.

We are so proud of you Sydni!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Sydni’s LinkedIn here.

Intern Update: Sarah Murray

Today’s Intern Update features Sarah Murray, who worked as a fiction editor on Issue 9 of Superstition Review.

With both a BA and MA in Creative Writing as well as involvement in various communities from HEAL International to the LGBTQ Coalition, Sarah has been directing the AIDS Walk in Los Angeles for the past year, promoting the event and overseeing its execution to help combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

She also works as a Digital Operations Editor for Fairy Tale Review, co-managing communications and outreach in addition to supervising the submission-to-publication process.

We are so proud of you Sarah!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Sarah’s LinkedIn page here.

Intern Updates: Brooke Stevenson

We are pleased to feature Brooke Stevenson, a Poetry Editor all the way from the very first Superstition Review issue! Having graduated from ASU with a degree in English Language/Literature and a concentration in Creative Writing, Brooke currently works as a Senior Proposal Content Specialist at Atkins, a company specialized in engineering and design. She has been at Atkins for ten years and counting, and she not only remains skilled in editing, but also in marketing communications. An amazing transition!

If you’d like to learn more about Brooke’s accomplishments, you can visit her LinkedIn page here.

#ArtLitPhx: PhxLitServ Meeting

Date: August 10
Time: noon to 3 p.m.
Location: Changing Hands, 300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Cost: Free

About this Event 

Come together with creative writing community organizers in Phoenix, AZ for the second meeting of the #PhxLitServ on Saturday, August 10, 2019 from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Changing Hands Phoenix (300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85013).

Where the first meeting brought everyone together to meet each other, share goals, and collaboratively determine what the #PhxLitServ should be, the second meeting will focus on setting up structure, identifying initiatives, and organizing committees. 

Please note: this meeting is not open to the public. You must have an access code to register for the meeting. Members will receive access codes, agendas, and more information about the meeting via email. You must be a member in order to attend.

#PhxLitServ is open to any individual organizing a recurring event, teaching a class, or providing some other kind of creative writing program, product, service or space with a six month history of actively serving the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. All genres and forms are welcome. Membership is free. 

To join the #PhxLitServ and become a member, visit our website at http://piper.asu.edu/phxlitserv. For more information, contact Marketing and Outreach Specialist Jake Friedman at 480.727.0818 or jake.friedman@asu.edu.

Guest Post, Penny Zang: Dress, Write, Mourn

How to Write About a Dead Woman

“As a rule, think plain, unadorned, gravitas. No cleavage, thigh-high boots, or microminis. No animal prints and certainly no cowboy fringe.”

— Nina Garcia’s Look Book: What to Wear for Every Occasion, “What to Wear to a Funeral”

Between January 1, 2016 and mid-February 2018, five people I loved died: my best friend, two aunts, my grandmother, and my father. I started writing “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” shortly after the last two deaths, when I was unable to stop myself from dreaming about dead women. It was always the women. Women watching me while I slept, women waiting for me to catch up.

I never questioned the dreams or what was happening on the page. Writing about dead women seemed to be the natural result of not taking off work, not talking about my grief, and not stopping the day-to-day “grind” of grading essays, folding laundry, and hosting birthday parties for a house full of five-year olds. 

“How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” was/is part of a longer work-in-progress. The individual sections, though, were born from the blend of influences that seeped into my brain during each of those mind-numbing, grief-filled days.

In no particular order: Sylvia Plath, Selena, Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties, Peaches ‘N Cream Barbie, Lincoln in the Bardo, what to wear to a funeral, how long it takes to grieve, Ouija boards, Bloody Mary, Twin Peaks, Linkin Park, George Michael, Amy Winehouse, The Cranberries, cremation, novel after novel after TV show after movie with a dead woman in the middle of the plot. The question of what happens to your best stories and your worst secrets if you’re the only one left alive to remember?

In his essay, “On Becoming an American Writer,” Alexander Chee says, “Speak to your dead. Write for your dead. Tell them a story. What are you doing with this life? Let them hold you accountable.” 

Is that what I was trying to do as I wrote in the aftermath of my grief? Did I intend to speak to my dead? On some level, yes. Each time I dream about my friend, always her more than the others, I wake up wondering what she wants me to do now. What stories does she want me to write? What secrets am I allowed to share? 

I wrote “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” with her in mind, her at age 35 and age 28 and age 22 and age 12. I saw her passing me a note in 8thgrade English and escorting me to junior prom and holding back my hair when we lived together years later. I saw her holding my son. I saw us shopping and sharing and stealing each other’s clothes. How intimate it all seems now, in retrospect, that I don’t have anyone who wants to borrow my favorite dress. 

The dress, I think, was always part of the story, even before I started writing. As I packed my funeral dress for my friend’s memorial service, I might have thought about the perfect symbolism of a black dress and how I would one day write about my loss. I had a feeling more funerals were coming (though I didn’t know how many or how quickly), and if I had thought about writing through my grief, I would have also known how central a dress would be to that narrative.  

Otherwise, I don’t remember writing a single word. 

One of the benefits of writing at 5 a.m. is that no one cares what I’m wearing. Inside-out T-shirts tops and ratty robes are my uniform. It doesn’t matter if I’m blurry, stumbling, and unable to form complete thoughts yet. There’s coffee, and a cat to keep me company. There’s a (hopefully) charged laptop. The sky is just the right kind of dark. 

This is how I write, with my subconscious still buzzing from half-baked dreams, and a complete lack of censorship. The internal editor is still asleep and the lack of perfection, the full-on embrace of imperfection, becomes the fuel for my creative process. A quiet house at 5 a.m. is pure luxury. Better than Burberry trench coats and Missoni knits and Frye harness boots, and whatever else Nina Garcia says I am supposed to own and enjoy.

After I wrote “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive,” my Twitter friend, Steve Bargdill, told me about keening. Keening is a death wail, a public lament that has now grown out of fashion, giving women a voice for their grief. Sometimes professional mourners were hired to grieve publically at funerals. I am simplifying, of course, but the blend of beauty and tragedy struck a nerve. Yes, I thought. That is what it feels like to ache and not have the words, or to not need the words, to express it. 

This is not to suggest that writing “How to Keep a Dead Woman Alive” was a healing experience. Not at all. I like how T Kira Madden addresses the issue of writing and healing in her essay “Against Catharsis: Writing is Not Therapy.” She writes, “But to render the art, to render the experience, does not, in my practice, involve ‘bleeding into the typewriter.’ It does not entail a writer spilling or spewing the memory onto a blank page, nailing it down, healing.” I don’t disagree.

Lately, my writing and my mourning are mashed together so brutally, I couldn’t ever call the creative process therapeutic. Instead, it feels like I am crafting a eulogy that no one has asked me to write. Over and over, it feels like standing in front of my family and friends, pretending like I have all the right words instead of one long, imperfect wail.  

#ArtLitPhx: Writing Workshop with Sandra Marinella

Writing Workshop with Sandra Marinella

The Story You Need To Tell: Embracing Your Creative Voice

book cover

Author Sandra Marinella (The Story You Need to Tell) leads a workshop on writing and exploring the power of your personal stories to heal, grow, and transform your life.

Your story matters. Ignite your passion for finding and writing down your stories in ways that will reveal your unique voice and unleash your personal creativity. This four-session workshop will share prompts to guide you to the stories you want to tell, explore writing that will show you how to develop your voice, and experiment with creative strategies to enhance your writing. This workshop will engage writers of all levels and provide opportunities to share your writing in a positive environment. Enrollment will be limited.

WORKSHOP DETAILS

  • Cost: $80 for four sessions, 10am-12pm Mondays, June 3, 10, 17, and 24
  • Register below or on the Eventbrite page.
  • No refunds within one day of the event.

ABOUT THE HOST 
A local, award-winning writing teacher and author SANDRA MARINELLA, MA, MEd, has taught thousands of students and fellow educators and presented hundreds of workshops to veterans, teachers, writers, and cancer patients about the power of our personal stories to heal, grow, and transform our lives. Sandra founded the Story You Need to Tell Project which provides workshops on the power of transformational story telling and personal writing. Profits from her book support cancer research and provide educational scholarships as well as writing workshops for those in need. She lives in Chandler, Arizona. Discover more at www.storyyoutell.com.

EVENT INFORMATION

Location: Changing Hands Bookstore, 300 W. Camelback Rd.,
Phoenix 

Dates: June 3, 10, 17, and 24

Time: 10 a.m. to noon

For more information about the event, click here.

Intern Update, Colleen Stinchcombe: Outside Article

Join us in congratulating former SR social media editor Colleen Stinchcombe! Since her work on Issue 11, Colleen has graduated from Arizona State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing and has worked as an editor for SheKnows Media, an international content marketer for Rover.com, and a freelance writer and editor. Some of her many publications can be found in Outside, GQ, REI Co-op Journal, SELF, Shape, Redbook, Woman’s Day, Brit+Co, SheKnows, Asparagus, and Green Living AZ.

Read one of her latest articles, “7 Thru-Hikers on Coping with Post-Trail Depression,” in Outside here.

Congratulations on your many accomplishments, Colleen!

Contributor Update, Jenn Givhan: Trinity Sight

Today we are thrilled to share news of past contributor Jenn Givhan. Jenn’s debut novel, Trinity Sight, is available for preorder from Blackstone Publishing, and will be published October 1, 2019. The novel, inspired by indigenous oral-history traditions, takes a new spin on dystopian fiction. Jenn’s characters are confronted with dueling concepts of science, faith, modern identity and ancestral tradition as they attempt to understand how the world fell apart.

The book is available for preorder here.

Congratulations Jenn!