Contributor Update, Thomas Gresham

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor Thomas “Tex” Gresham on the release of his experimental collection, Heck, Texas. Tex is a screenwriter and fiction author and is currently studying screenwriting at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. The book is a play on the stereotypical disreputable Texas town and lies somewhere between the real and imaginary. The book was released on September 4th and is available at Barnes&Noble, Bookshop, and Amazon.

The back of Heck, Texas reads: “Somewhere deep in East Texas, the hunt is on, fueled by self-hate, cough syrup, white whales, massive zits, freakshows, madness, dead pets, lost children, killer coffee, rats, Satan, good times, bad people, vomit, dementia, diarrhea, sex, and clowns. Your favorite brand of disease is back in stock. Welcome to Heck, Texas.”

Congratulations, Tex!

Stay up-to-date with Tex by visiting his website here or his Twitter here. Be sure to also take a look at his short story for Issue 21 here.

Contributor Update, Patricia Clark

We are excited to announce past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Patricia Clark is releasing a new book of poems titled Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars. Patricia Clark has been featured in the poetry sections of Issues 7, 8, and 17 of Superstition Review. Her latest book will release October 14th, but is available for pre-order at Amazon or Barnes&Noble. Self-Portrait With a Million Dollars is the sixth volume of poetry Patricia has written and focuses on the world as she sees it, through the attentive lens of an imaginative author with a keen eye for detail. The book ranges a wide variety of topics and places and will take the reader on a journey through space and emotion.

Patricia Clark’s Self-Portrait with a Million Dollars is full of her usual wide-ranging brilliance and sly wit. It’s a monk’s travelogue, a scholar’s giddy after-party. Exquisitely rendered, these poems, for all their beauty and mastery of tone and rhythm, their sprezzatura, are at once delicate and durable, by turns landmarks, monuments, and tombstones-each a fresh testament to that most marvelous of human traits, our limitless human capacity for invention, and the necessity of witness. Whoever, wherever you are, find this book. I promise, you’ll be astonished and nourished. -Daniel Lawless, Editor of Plume

Congratulations on your new book of poetry, Patricia!

Check out Patricia’s poetry featured in Issue 7 here, Issue 8 here, and Issue 17 here. Keep up-to-date with Patricia and her writing at her website here.

Contributor Update, Kathleen Winter

Join us in congratulating past Superstition Review contributor and award-winning poet Kathleen Winter on being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon. The DMQ Virtual Salon is a series in which authors share poems from their 2020 books. Kathleen released her latest book of poems titled Transformer in June of this year. It is currently on sale through Small Press Distribution. This collection of poems focuses on violence and domestic abuse, the pain that often comes with revisiting the past, and the nakedness with which one must present herself in order to discuss these things. Kathleen uses historical references and a transcendence through physical spaces we are all familiar with in order to craft a narrative that is electric with emotion. Congratulations Kathleen on the release of your new book and for being featured in DMQ Review’s September Virtual Salon!

Check out Kathleen’s poetry featured in Issue 13 here and Issue 20 here. Be sure to also check out an interview she did for the Chris Rice Cooper Blog here.

David Meischen, A Contributor Update

In this week’s contributor update, we are proud to feature the debut of Anyone’s Son, contributor David Meischen’s recently published poetry collection. Anyone’s Son was published in May of 2020 by 3: A Taos Press.

We previously featured David’s short story “In The Garden” in Issue 7 of Superstition Review and he has since authored two guest posts on our blog.

“From the rural South Texas of the nineteen fifties to a desert mesa in New Mexico many years later, Anyone’s Son illuminates the moments of a life animated by the author’s yearning, at its root sexual, for the company of another man. In five sections, each one corresponding to a stage in the life delineated here, the author offers scenes from his childhood on a small farm, as well as moments of conflicted adolescence. He explores unmitigated sexual pleasure, sometimes fraught with anguish and shame. He remembers scenes from marriage and fatherhood, from the wreckage and rebuilding that came at midlife. And finally, glimpses from a second marriage, this time unconflicted, to a man, to the right man. At its heart, Anyone’s Son poses an implicit question: What is identity?”

To read more about David and his work, visit his website here.

Kristina Moriconi, A Contributor Update

In this week’s Contributor Update, we are highlighting past contributor Kristina Moriconi and her recently published lyric narrative, In The Cloakroom of Proper Musings. It tells the story “of one woman’s joy juxtaposed alongside her need to survive.”

We previously featured Kristina’s essay “To Make It Make Sense” in Issue 17 of Superstition Review and are very excited for this book debut. In addition to In The Cloakroom of Proper Musings, Kristina has also published a poetry collection, No Such Place, and has been featured in the nonfiction anthology Flash Nonfiction Food.

To see more of Kristina’s work, check out her website and Instagram page.

Contributor Update, Martin Ott: Poetry Book Release

Congratulations to past contributor Martin Ott on the release of his third poetry collection “Lessons in Camouflage” scheduled for immediate release on June 1 at C&R Press: https://www.crpress.org/shop/camouflage/. Martin Ott’s short story “The Policy” was featured in Issue 11 of Superstition Review. We are truly happy for this past contributor!
Contributor Update

Contributor Update: Jo Scott-Coe Book Release

Mass Cover by Jo Scott-CoeMass: A Sniper, a Father, and a Priest by Jo Scott-Coe is available for pre-order. The title, which is available through Pelekinesis, starts shipping on April 4, 2018.

Mass: A Sniper, a Father, and a Priest inquires about the 1966 mass shooting at the University of Texas from atop the clock tower by Charles Whitman. Jo “turns the camera away from the spectacle” following narratives beyond the news stories, to view the narratives of the people in Whitman’s life before the planned violence (Pelekinesis Press Release).

Jo was first featured in Issue 4 of Superstition Review with her non-fiction piece “Foreign Objects,” and later in Issue 14 with “The Other Spencer Girl.”

Congratulations on the upcoming release, Jo!

#ArtLitPhx: Ms. X’s Ocean by Elizabeth McNeil Book Release

Ms. XFour Chambers present’s their latest book release, a collection of poems entitled “Ms. X’s Ocean” by Elizabeth McNeil. THe event takes place Saturday, February 18th, 2017 at  7 pm  at the Hive 2222 N 16th St, Phoenix, AZ 85006. This event is free and open to the public. Parking is available along Cypress St. or surrounding neighborhoods. For more information visit their website or RSVP to the Facebook event. You can download a press release or the event flier. For a sneak preview, you can view a packet of sample poems.

Like Anne Sexton’s Transformations nearly half a century before her, Ms. X’s Ocean harbors a host mythical revisions—Daphne, Mary Magdalene, the mermaid, the fairytale haired girl—while presenting, in broader strokes, an allegory of contemporary femininity. Scouring the ground of trauma, Ms. X shape shifts her way through incest, rape, sexual abuse, and abortion. Ms. X endures with unflinching grimness, driven by the fact that she simply has to survive. With a masterful grasp of imagery and craft—ranging from the ragged grit of hard-boiled noir to the high, transfigurative lyric of an aboriginal dreamtime—McNeil creates a shattered looking-glass, its language sharp as shards, portraying a woman who, through the sheer determination of her self-authorship, through her re-immersion in pure mother earth, finds a way to fit the jagged pieces of herself back together, walking “unafraid at last / into the church of [her] beating heart.”

Elizabeth McNeil is an instructor in Languages and Cultures at Arizona State University. She also teaches memoir and poetry writing in the greater community, working with children, veterans, inmates, church groups, and writers over fifty. She has published numerous scholarly and creative works, including poetry in Hayden’s Ferry Review, Fourteen Hills, Flyway, and the Chaminade Literary Review, among other journals; the award-winning chapbook Why We Need to Come Home (Butte County Poetry Center & Press, 1988); a monograph, Trickster Discourse: Mediating Transformation for a New World (Lambert, 2010); and, as lead editor, two scholarly collections with Palgrave Macmillan, Sapphire’s Literary Breakthrough: Erotic Literacies, Feminist Pedagogies, Environmental Justice Perspectives (2012), nominated for the 2013 Association of American Colleges and Universities’ Frederic W. Ness Book Award for an outstanding book that “contributes to the understanding and improvement of liberal education,” and Mapping Queer Space(s) of Praxis and Pedagogy (Queer Studies in Education Series, 2017).

Book Release Party with Rebecca Byrkit, Cynthia Hogue, Jerry Riopelle, and AmeriCamera

Rebecca Byrkit with Cynthia Hogue, Jerry Riopelle, and AmeriCamera on September 23, 2012 by Letterpress Central.

Book release party, readings, musical performances
Doors open 4 p.m.

6185 W. Detroit Street
Chandler, Arizona 85226
Presented by Kariboux Ltd. and Letterpress Central

Rebecca Byrkit is the author of four books of poems, the most recent of which is WHOA (Kariboux Ltd., 2012). Becky teaches literature and creative writing in SLS and MLSt programs at ASU. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry (Scribners), Ploughshares, Best of Exquisite Corpse, Black Warrior Review, Letters to the World (Red Hen Press), Fever Dreams: Poets of the Southwest (UA Press), Arizona Highways, and Rolling Stone. She is the current nonfiction faculty advisor for Superstition Review.


Cynthia Hogue
holds the Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Chair in Modern and Contemporary Poetry at Arizona State University. She has published seven collections of poetry, most recently Or Consequence.

Jerry Riopelle is a songwriter and musician inducted in the Arizona Music Hall of Fame.

AmeriCamera (T.R. Hummer and Billy Cioffi), is a Grammy award-winning combo featuring “text-based poetry and music.”

 
Reception to follow readings and performances. All are welcome!

Announcing: Matthew Gavin Frank

In our Issue 7, Superstition Review had the honor to publish poetry by Matthew Gavin Frank. We would like to share that Frank’s new book Pot Farm (The University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books), is now available for pre-order on the press website and on Amazon. The book is a behind-the-scenes exposé of a Northern California medical marijuana farm.

Praise for Pot Farm:

Pot Farm is the curious and compelling tale of a hazy season spent harvesting medical marijuana. The cast of characters rivals those found in the finest comic fiction, except these folks are real, and really peculiar. Pot Farm is smart, sly, revelatory, often laugh-out-loud funny, and entirely legal.”—Dinty W. Moore, author of Between Panic and Desire

“Sex, politics, intrigue, crime, adventure, life and death—it’s all here, in a strangely compelling hybrid of action flick meets postmodern philosophical meditation meets Cheech and Chong. This compulsively readable exposé from a self-proclaimed ‘unreliable narrator’ has it all, including a cast of outcast characters who simply jump off the page.”—Gina Frangello, author of Slut Lullabies

Frank’s book Barolo has gone into its second printing in paperback, and will include links to Italian Piemontese recipes. This new addition is available for preorder here.

Congratulations, Matthew.