Guest Post, Maureen Alsop: Anemomancy

AnemomancyAnemomancy

              divination by predicting weather change or reading the future strength and

direction of the wind

 

Along the road’s pitch, a token of yellow moths—the auburn
river’s warning tool— electricity
                          between wing and crescent, where
reeds open the mailbox’ flag. As for the matter
of your father’s death.  I observe a signet ring lower
into the dim.  I signal in conscious dream
that day’s influence where I crossed into a calm
             holding his hand— what bereavement became—a percussion
of bullets bore his chest
in the faithful matter of betrayal.  No more ledgers.

But a bowl’s moss and mixed grain, a morning
without generation, a narcoleptic close of eye like envelopes.

Once I stopped talking.  Once I was love’s weak redundancy.
Did I not say no?       I did not say yes.
My hair undoes the lake’s ether.

#ArtLitPhx: ASU Stellar Alumni Reading Series feat. Bojan Louis and Irena Praitis

Bojan Louis and Irena Praitis

ASU’s Creative Writing Program is so excited to present its brightest, most talented alumni writers in this new series, the Stellar Alumni Reading Series. In this installment, Irena Praitis (MFA 1999; PhD 2001) and Bojan Louis (MFA 2009) will read from their work.

The reading will take place Thursday, October 26 from 7pm to 8:30pm in the Cochise Room of the Memorial Union on the ASU Tempe campus. A book signing will follow the reading – Bojan Louis is the author of Currents, and Irena Praitis is the author of The Last Stone in the Circle.

In Currents, Louis discusses the kinetic dissonance of the contemporary struggle to coexist with self-inflicted eroding environments. In The Last Stone in the Circle, Praitis chronicles experiences of prisoners in a WWII German work re-education camp based on eye-witness accounts. The synopsis details, “Delving into the murkiness of human experience in the face of suffering, the poems consider the complicated choices people make in impossibly difficult circumstances and explore the sheer resilience of survival.”

This event is free and open to the public. We previously featured this event in our Contributor Updates because Irena Praitis was featured in our very first issue – read her poems in Issue 1 here.

For more information on the event, check out the ASU website and the Facebook page.

Contributor Update: Michelle Menting

Leaves Surface Like SkinToday we are pleased to announce that past contributor Michelle Menting’s debut collection of poems, Leaves Surface Like Skin, has been recently released. The book has already received praise from poet Sandra Beasley, who says, “Menting has a gift for moody and luminous phrasing: ‘For some, the world is wood tick wicked.’ There’s magic to a collection that does such heavy lifting with a light touch.” Purchase your copy through Terrapin, Amazon, B&N, or through your local bookstore.

To read Michelle’s essay “On Becoming Vegan” in Issue 3 of Superstition Review click here.

#ArtLitPhx: Literatura, artes e industria editorial en Phoenix

Literatura, artes e industria editorial en PhoenixCardboard House PressCALA Alliance, and ASU’s School of International Letters and Cultures are hosting Casandra Hernandez and Giancarlo Huapaya in their lecture series. The pair will discuss literature, arts, and publishing in Phoenix during this bilingual event. The event will take place Thursday, October 19, from 1:30pm to 2:40pm at the Piper Writers House on the ASU Tempe Campus (450 E. Tyler Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281).

Casandra Hernandez is the Executive Director of the CALA Alliance, and Giancarlo Huapaya is the editor of Cardboard House Press. For more information, check out the event’s Facebook page.

Intern Update: Elijah Tubbs

Today we have some exciting news to share about past Superstition Review intern Elijah Tubbs. ELKE, “a little journal” both founded and edited by Elijah Tubbs, has recently released Issue 3. Elijah served as the poetry editor for Superstition Review in Issues 16 and 17. Purchase a copy of ELKE’s Issue 3 (The Women’s Issue) by clicking here.

Congratulations, Elijah!ELKE a little journal

Authors Talk: Douglas Manuel

Today we are pleased to feature poet Douglas Manuel as our Authors Talk series contributor. His talk is a reading of the lyrical essay that he wrote reflecting on his poem, “Who’s Little Boy Are You?”

The poem’s title comes from a question in James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, that points at belonging and ‘fissures between the messages of the uplifting Black church and street survival tactics’ that are “crucial to understanding the Black experience in America.” What follows is a deeply personal rumination from Douglas about his father and who belongs to whom, if anyone ever really does. Finally, Douglas reflects on the way that he represents his father in other poems including “Little Fires Left by Travelers.”

You can read and listen to both of Douglas’s aforementioned poems in Superstition Review Issue 19.