Meet the Interns: Nicole Davis, Photoshopper

Nicole Davis is a freshman in Graphic Design.

Superstition Review: What is your position with Superstition Review and what are your responsibilities?

Nicole Davis: I am the Photoshopper. I use Photoshop to format all the headshots that are published in SR and I also help with advertising ideas.

SR: How did you hear about Superstition Review and what made you decide to get involved?

ND: I got an email about an internship and applied. I didn’t expect to get it, and I am so excited to be a part of SR this issue.

SR: What are you hoping to take away from your Superstition Review experience?

ND: I want to gain a better understanding of what it takes to put together and publish a magazine.

SR: Describe one of your favorite literary or artistic works.

ND: I really love collages and photomontages like work by Hong Hao.

SR: What are you currently reading?

ND: Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller, I love it so far.

SR: What is your favorite Superstition Review section, and why?

ND: I really love the art section. I’m a painter and a photographer so seeing other people’s art is really inspiring.

SR: What other position(s) for Superstition Review would you like to try out?

ND: I would love to be an art editor or work in advertising.

SR: Do you prefer reading literary magazines online or in print?

ND: Print, I truly love having that tangible object versus the computer screen.

SR: Do you write or create art? What are you currently working on?

ND: I used to write when I was younger but now I’m much more artistic. I’m currently working on a painting of superman for my older brother for his birthday.

SR: Besides interning for Superstition Review, how do you spend your time?

ND: I’m a full-time student, and I also have a part time job and a pizza place called Picazzo’s. I also attend a group called YoungLife and rehearse with the ASU Gospel Choir each week.

SR: What is your favorite mode of relaxation?

ND: Napping. Nothing is better than a nice, mid-day nap.

SR: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

ND: In 10 years I hope to have a job that I enjoy. While my dream is to be a magazine editor, I’m open to my future. I’m not positive where I’ll end up, but my biggest goal is to be happy.

Progress Update: Picking Up Steam

We’re concluding our third week working on Issue 5 of Superstition Review, and we’re really picking up steam: open submissions are pouring in, readings are being scheduled, the website is beginning to take shape, and our interns are hitting their strides.

Our Section Editors have prepared lists of authors and artists they would like to solicit work from and/or interview. The Solicitations and Interview Coordinators have organized these lists and are preparing to work with the editors to send out the solicitations emails. Now our Art, Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction Editors are shifting their focus toward reading and evaluating the open submissions that have been piling up in our Submissions Editor’s inbox.

Our Reading Series Coordinator set up our first reading of the semester (details soon to come!) and is now brainstorming authors and ideas for our March reading. Our Advertising Coordinator sent out email marketing for our submissions period (keep sending us your work!), and she’s now teaming up with our Photoshopper to create some ads to exchange with other magazines. Our Development Coordinators are doing important work on grants and bringing Superstition Review to Kindle (you’ll hear about it here when we’ve got that all set up!). Our Web Designers are in the process of assembling our staff and events pages. And finally, I’m here, keeping you up-to-date on everything happening with Superstition Review. Keep reading!

Meet the Interns: Tabitha Gutierrez, Advertising

tabithagutierrez_0Tabitha Gutierrez is a senior majoring in Business and English Creative Writing.

Superstition Review: What do you do for SR?

Tabitha Gutierrez: At SR, I am in charge of advertising and getting the word about SR out to the public. I write press releases/newsletter providing updates about upcoming readings, submission periods, etc. as well as pursue ways of gaining advertising.

SR: How did you hear about or get involved with Superstition Review?

TG: I heard about Superstition Review through an email from the English department regarding internship possibilities. I selected SR as my internship because I felt like a student run magazine was new and interesting.

SR: What is your favorite section of SR? Why?

TG: I especially enjoy the artwork. Being an English major, I read multiple works from various authors daily. However, I have always loved art and find that the art included in SR makes a nice change.

SR: Who is your dream contributor to the journal? Talk about him/her.

TG: My dream contributor would be Tim Burton. Although I am obsessed with his movies, I absolutely love his artwork that he does. He has albums filled with art for movies and characters that are truly unique. Also, I think that any stories submitted would be different and fun.

SR: What job, other than your own, would you like to try out in the journal?

TG: I think that it would be interesting to work with art selection. I would love to view and compare different works of art and discuss how others view it as well.

SR: What are you most excited for in the upcoming issue?

TG: I am most excited to see the results of readership. I feel like an increase would reflect a contribution that I did in advertising.

SR: What was the first book you remember falling in love with and what made it so special?

TG: When I was younger, I really loved the Diary of Anne Frank. Although sad, I felt like it was the perfect combination of history, youth, nonfiction, relatability, etc.

SR: What are you currently reading?

TG: I cannot put the final book of Twilight down. I already read the series but loved the last book that I had to read it again. I know it is a sensation but I find a real art to the way it is written.

SR: What are some of your favorite websites to waste time on or distract you from homework?

TG: I usually get distracted by YouTube. Not matter your mood, you can always find something to fit your desire. If I am in a funny mood, hilarious pet videos always keep your mood up. Or, if I am in an artsy mood watching people sing and try to get there name out there can be inspiring.

SR: What would be your dream class to take at ASU? What would the title be and what would it cover?

TG: My dream course at ASU would be a Next Step class. I think that faculty focus so much on the transition into college, getting classes, and your overall freshman year, but barely focus on your Senior year. I wish there was a class that explained the best way of breaking into career fields, what to really expect, realistic salaries, etc. How are we supposed to base degrees and majors on something so unfamiliar?

Meet the Interns: Melissa Silva, Interview Coordinator

melissasilva_0Melissa Silva is a Sophomore at Arizona State University majoring in Economics and International Relations.

Superstition Review: What do you do for SR?

Melissa Silva: I’m the Interview Coordinator. I organize potential authors to interview, contact the authors and then become the communication link between the editors and authors.

SR: How did you hear about or get involved with Superstition Review?

MS: My ENG 102 teacher recommended I become involved.

SR: What is your favorite section of SR? Why?

MS: The interview section. I like hearing about how the authors developed each character and where the whole idea had its origins.

SR: Who is your dream contributor to the journal?

MS: Jonathan Safran Foer. He wrote Everything is Illuminated and I love his writing style. His characters are always very beautiful and complex. The format of his novels are always a little out of the box.

SR: What job, other than your own, would you like to try out in the journal?

MS: Because I’m a business student I think an admin job like advertising or funding would be a really great challenge to try out what I’ve learned and get some real-world experience.

SR: What are you most excited for in the upcoming issue?

MS: I’m excited to see who the authors are that are going to be interviewed for the next issue. I’m hoping to be able to contact some of the names that I’ve read and loved.

SR: What was the first book you remember falling in love with and what made it so special?

MS: The first book would probably the collection of Winnie the Pooh tales my mom had from when she was younger. Now that I look back on it the lovable characters were just simplified versions of personalities I encounter now. But I loved how unique and special each character was to Christopher Robin.

SR: What are you currently reading?

MS: I just finished Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. It’s a collection of short stories. Her writing is so exact and realistic but somehow it draws a lot of emotion and sympathy from the reader for her characters.

SR: What artist have you really connected with, either in subject matter, work, or motto?

MS: I remember I read JD Salinger’s Franny and Zooey while I was going through a hard time. The idea of someone who would help you rationalize out of your own mind trap was a beautiful idea.

SR: What would be your dream class to take at ASU? What would the title be and what would it cover?

MS: The title of the class would be “Getting through the Labyrinth.” I remember in the book Looking for Alaska, after the suicide of one of his students, the teacher assigned the class to write a paper on how to get through the labyrinth that is life. They would look into their sources of happiness–religion, texts, friendship, etc–and create a strategy. Finding those things that have meaning and applying them to your own life would be the goal of the class.

Meet the Interns: Dustin Diehl, Nonfiction Editor

dustinDustin Diehl is a Senior at Arizona State University majoring in English Literature and minoring in Religious Studies. He is also pursuing a LGBT Certificate.

Superstition Review: What do you do for SR?

Dustin Diehl: I solicit work from nonfiction authors to be considered for publication. I then read through submissions (both solicited and submitted) and decide which ones I think should be included. Together, with Liz, we decide which ones to include, then send out rejection/acceptance e-mails.

SR: How did you hear about or get involved with Superstition Review?

DD: Trish is my Honors Thesis advisor and asked if I would like to participate…I said yes!

SR: What is your favorite section of SR? Why?

DD: I really enjoy fiction; however, I’ve been earning a deeper appreciation for nonfiction…seeing how people can take ordinary circumstances (or even not-so-ordinary circumstances) and convey them in a creative and readable form is fascinating to me.

SR: Who is your dream contributor to the journal? Talk about him/her.

DD: I would love for Michael Stackpole to contribute a short fiction story. I love his Star Wars novels and he’s a local writer!

SR: What job, other than your own, would you like to try out in the journal?

DD: I think it would be fun to be a part of the marketing team. I work for an online ad agency, so getting to apply my job skills to something fun like SR would be pretty cool.

SR: What are you most excited for in the upcoming issue?

DD: I’m really excited to read the submitted work…it’s always fun to read people’s work, especially when you find a diamond in the rough!

SR: What was the first book you remember falling in love with and what made it so special?

DD: The first book I fell in love with was The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare. I loved how it deftly juxtaposed religious history, political history and fiction into a very readable and timeless story. In high school, I adapted the book into a play script and would still love to produce a stage version of the book.

SR: What are you currently reading?

DD: Currently reading the Star Wars: X-Wing series by Michael Stackpole and Aaron Allston. Reading should be fun, and these books are fun!

SR: What are some of your favorite websites to waste time on or distract you from homework?

DD: I’m a huge movie buff, so I’m constantly on WorstPreviews.com, a movie news blog.  I’m also an avid Star Wars fan, so I enjoy TheForce.net as well.

SR: Do you write? Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I do write; usually fiction, but I’ve found nonfiction to be very satisfying as well. I’m working on a collection of creative nonfiction essays for my Honors Thesis as well as a LGBT-themed modern fantasy novel.

Last Quiet Before the Storm

This week our editors, in all genres, began to send out their solicitations under the advisement of their team managers. The managers, responsible for keeping track of who we have asked to submit work to us and gathering contact information of the artists and writers we’re asking to submit, have been busy helping their editors prepare for the responses that will begin filtering in.

Our Content Team has been busy keeping track of what’s going in and out of our editors’ hands still. As work comes in and is accepted or rejected by our editors, this team lists the status, and, if accepted, is responsible for readying it for publishing, including tracking down bios and formatting contributor headshots. The advertising side of this team has also been busy preparing fliers and announcements for local bookstores and literary communities to announce future SR events, whether it be our Reading Series (first one in little over a week–September 21!) or the actual launch of the journal.

The interns working with the administrative efforts of the journal have had a lot on their plate between organizing our first-ever writing contest and making the move to Kindle. Don’t worry, we’ll still be completely accessible online, but we want to give our readers the option to enjoy SR on the go, and this is an exciting new way to do this. The logistics of the upcoming SR reading began falling into place, too, with the booking of the site and acquisition of a photographer for the event to capture the excitement of Stella Pope Duarte’s reading.

Finally, the Web Design Team has simply been continuing to work on the site overhaul, behind the scenes. The interns have been getting staff bios and headshots ready and throwing out design ideas to make the new look something lasting and aesthetically appealing for everyone. And, of course, we’ve been keeping you updated here, on the blog, as well as our Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Next week, when responses start rolling in, we’ll all feel the pressure–and excitement–a bit more. As for now, things are running pretty smoothly and we’re glad for it.

Meet the Interns: Derrick Laux, Administrative Team Manager

derricklaux_0Derrick Laux is a student of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences majoring in English Literature. He is Superstition Review’s Administrative Team Manager, head of the Administrative Team. This semester he is a senior.

Superstition Review: What do you do for SR?

Derrick Laux: I manage four interns in areas of administrative duties including advertising, reading series, funding & development, and contests. My job is to create workflows, manage deadlines and be available to answer any questions and assist with the workload in each of these four areas.

SR: How did you hear about or get involved with Superstition Review?

DL: I contacted Trish Murphy, our Editor-in-Chief, with questions about a couple of specific fall and summer courses and told her that I was looking for an opportunity, like an internship, that would help prepare me with some marketable skills and resume building attributes. She said she needed some help managing the workload for Superstition Review and it seemed like a perfect fit at the perfect time. I was afraid that my schedule would not allow me the freedom to partake in an internship that required a lot of physical presence on campus, so when she informed me that the majority of the work was done online, I saw something that could potentially work.

SR: What is your favorite section of SR?

DL: Personally, I like the interviews. I love knowing background information about authors and artists and the opportunity to get to know them on a personal level. Their writing affects and influences so many people that I just think it’s really neat to humanize them for a brief instant and see what makes them tick, what they do in their everyday lives, and what inspires them.

SR: Who is your dream contributor to the journal?

DL: Most of the time, I don’t feel qualified enough to answer a question like this or make any kind of literary assessments due to the limited nature of my reading. In comparison to others, I feel like I’m very under-read, but if I could pick anyone right now, it would be a writer from the American Southwest, namely Leslie Marmon Silko. I’ve not read a lot of her work, but I’m absolutely infatuated with Ceremony and the spiritual healing that characterizes that book. It’s beautiful. Anyone that can write something like that, I’d like to see more of their work, especially something exclusive to Superstition Review. I’m falling in love with the Southwest and really feel like it’s neat if we can publish local authors representative of the region that we represent as a literary magazine. Rudolfo Anaya, Barbara Kingsolver, and other contemporary Southwestern writers would be my ideal contributors.

SR: What job, other than your own, would you like to try out in the journal?

DL: I think I’d love to be either the Web Design Editor or the Interview Coordinator. I’m infatuated with logos, graphics, and the overall visual appearance of things. I feel like you only get one chance to make a first impression, and the design of a page usually either clicks the interest switch on or off in a person’s head. Great design is an attention grabber and sets an immediate successful tone while poor design shuts people off in an instant. Their minds are already tainted with bad thoughts if the design isn’t up-to-par. I think being the interview coordinator might be just as fun and rewarding because as I stated before, I love getting to know people on a personal level to see what makes them tick and inspires them to write the things that influence and move our everyday lives.

SR: What are you most excited for in the upcoming issue?

DL: The new design of the webpage and the reading series. I feel like there’s so much potential for both to help establish Superstition Review’s name and get the word out about our publication. Never before have I had the access to deal with such established and talented writers. The chance to meet some of them and even host them at one of our readings is a big goal of mine that really excites me.

SR: What are you currently reading?

DL: I’m currently reading whatever is assigned for my classes. Luckily, the books have been interesting. Recently, I just finished Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote and Double Indemnity by James M. Cain. I thought Breakfast at Tiffany’s was a great book, far better than the film.

SR: What are some of your favorite websites to waste time on or distract you from homework?

DL: Nfl.com and as of late, Craigslist. I’m trying to get set-up in my new place and Craigslist is a life-saver. There’s a lot of good stuff on there whether you’re poor or not.

SR: What would be your dream class to take at ASU? What would the title be and what would it cover?

DL: It would be a class called either “NFL Football” or “American Microbrews.” Beer has become such a hobby of mine and I love spending my free time finding out more about new beers and breweries. It’s the new wine tasting in this country because there are so many good microbreweries out there. Football is self-explanatory. If you don’t like football, there’s something wrong with you; I don’t care how nice you are.

SR: What are your feelings on digital medium?

DL: I like the easy access that technology provides, but it really does leave me feeling jaded and detached at times. I can’t argue with the convenience that new developments like Kindle provide, but most times I see someone using a device like that and think, “Man, I really miss the simplicity of a paperback book.” There’s a lot of quality stuff to be said in blogs out there, but I just don’t like the feeling of sitting behind a screen all day long. It does things to people and its very dehumanizing, especially when I catch myself being mesmerized by the computer.

Guest Article: Spotlight on Kelly Vo, by Asonta Benetti

kellyvo_0
Kelly Vo.

Superstition Review student intern Asonta Benetti interviewed past intern Kelly Vo to see how she was impacted by her experiences with SR:

“It really was not a planned internship,” Kelly Vo remembers, “but I know that without the amazing experiences I had at Superstition Review, I wouldn’t be as prepared for the next steps of my life.” Vo started with SR in Spring 2008, helping kick off the premier issue by holding down the Fiction Editor position with another colleague. “I didn’t know how much work and time went into getting an online magazine off the ground and running,” she recollects. “Creating a new magazine is a huge project and I know that it would not have turned into such a wonderful magazine if it wasn’t for the fact that we all collaborated and worked together to make a great product.”

Vo is currently an intern at E.B. Lane Publishing, working in the advertising Account Management sector. She plans to graduate this coming December and has applied to join Teach for America. “I very much enjoyed being an intern for Superstition Review. It was an amazing experience. I had never worked on a magazine before and I never really thought it would be something that I would enjoy but it ended up being a blast.”